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Full text of "Biennial report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of North Carolina to Governor ..., for the scholastic years ."

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BIENNIAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



NORTH CAROLINA 



GOVERNOR W. W. KITCHIN 



FOR THE 



SCHOLASTIC YEARS 1908-1909 AND 1909-1910. 



RALEIGH: 

E M UZZELL a CO.. STATE PRINTERS AND BINDERS. 

1910 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 



J. Y. JoYNER Superiutendeut of Public Instruction. 

Allen J. Baewick ; . . . Chief Clerli. 

C. H. Mebane Special Clerk for Loan Fund, etc. 

J. A. BiviNs Supervisor of Teacher Training. 

N. W. Walkek State Inspector of Public High Schools. 

L. C. Bkogden Supervisor of Elementary Public Schools. 

I. O. ScHAUB Agent Agricultural Extension. 

Miss Hattie B. Arkington Stenographer. 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

W. W. KiTCHiN Governor, President. 

J. Y. Joyner Superintendent of Public Instruction, Secretai-y. 

W. C. Nev?land Lieutenant Governor, Lenoir, N. C. 

J. Bryan Grimes Secretary of State. 

B. R. Lacy State Treasurer. 

W. P. Wood State Auditor. 

T. W. Bickett Attorney-General. 

STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS. 

J. Y. Joyner Chairman ex officio. 

Allen J. Barwick Secretary. 

F. L. Stevens , West Raleigh. 

N. W. Walker Chapel Hill. 

John Graham Warrenton. 

Z. Y. JuDD Raleigh. 






LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 



State of North Carolina, 

Department of Public Instruction, 

Raleigh, December 15, 1910. 

'I'll II is E.rvclh'iicii, W. W. Kitchin, 

Governor of yorth Carolina. 

Dear Sir : — According to section 4000 of tlie Revisal of 1905, I b.ive the 

honor to transmit my Biennial Report for the scholastic years 1908-1909 and 

1909-1910. Very truly yours, 

J. Y. JOYNEK, 

Superintendent of Piihlic Instruction. 



596. :8 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PART I. 

Summary aud Brief Outline of Two Years' Progress in Education. 

Kecommendations. 

Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 

Statistical Summary of Two Years' Progress. 

PART II. 

Public School Statistics, inOS-lOOD. 
Public School Statistics, 1000-1910. 

PART III. 

Report of State Inspector of Public High Schools. 1908-1000. 
Report of State Inspector of Public High Schools, 1000-1010. 
Report of Supervisor of Teacher-training. 
Report of Superintendent of Croatan Normal School and Colored 

Normal Schools. 
Report of Inspector of Elementary Schools. 
Report of Agent for Agricultural Extension. 
Report of Expenditures Slater Fund. 
Report of Expenditures Peabody Fund. 
Circular-letters of State Superintendent. 
Decisions of State Superintendent. 



PART I. 



SUMMARY AND BRIEF OUTLINE OF TWO YEARS' PROGRESS 

IN EDUCATION. 
RECOMMENDATIONS. 

WORK TO BE DONE AND HOW TO DO IT. 
STATISTICAL SUMMARY OF TWO YEARS' PROGRESS. 



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SUMMARY AND BRIEF OUTLINE OF TWO YEARS' PROGRESS IN 

EDUCATION. 



The following summary aud brief outline of the progress in yublic etlucation 
for the biennial period beginning July 1, 1008, and ending June 30, 1010, is 
based upon the official reports on tile in the office of the Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, and can be verified in detail by the published statistical 
reports of this biennial period. 

Increase in School Funds. — The total available school fund for the year 
ending June 30, lOlO, was $3,550,575.06. This is an increase of $250,343.30 over 
the total available school fund for 1008. Of this total available school fund 
for 1010, $2.(;31.0(;2.17 was raised by State and county taxation and appropria- 
tion, and $877,899.01 was raised by local taxation in special-tax districts, of 
which $.580,885.28 was raised in urban districts aud $206,014.63 in rural dis- 
tricts. This is an increase in 1910 over 1008 of $157,101.33 in the amount 
raised by local taxation in rural districts and $69,800.18 raised by local taxa- 
tion in urban districts. 

Of the total available school fund for 1910, $2,377,652.47 was the rural 
school fund and $1,172,012.50 the urban school fund. In percentage there has 
been an increase of 112 per cent in the funds raised by local taxation in rural 
districts, and 13 per cent in the funds raised by local taxation in urban dis- 
tricts, and 13 per cent in the annual available fund raised by general State 
and county taxation and appropriation in 1010 over 1008. 

Excluding bonds, loans. State appropriations, and balance from previous 
year, the whole amount raised by taxation for public schools during 1010 was 
$2,657,372.83, an increase of $283,456.22 over 1008. The rural increase in 
funds x-aised by taxation in 1910 over 1908 was $216,057.57, the city increase 
$67,308.65. These figures show that during 1010 $3.58 was raised for each 
child of school age enumerated in our State school census ; $2.88 for each 
child outside of the cities and towns, and $6.80 for each child within the cities 
and towns. This was a per capita increase in 1910 over 1908 of 29 cents for 
each country child of school age, and 44 cents for each city child of school 
age. 

These comparisons are made between the last year of this biennial period 
and the last year of the preceding biennial period, so as to indicate the prog- 
ress of the i)eri()d. The figures for the year 1000 can be easily ascertained 
from the published statistical reports herein, and the relative progress of 1010 
over lOOf) can easily be ascertained. 

For What the Money was Spent. — With this increase in the available funds 
for educational purposes, there has been during the period a corresponding 
increase in those things which can be provided only by increased funds. 
There has been an increase of $585,745 in the value of rural school property 
and $3.50,912 in the value of urban sthool property, making a total increase 
of $945,657 in the total value of the public school property of the State. 
There has been expended during the period $667,605.02 for building, improv- 
ing, and equipping public school houses. Seven hundred and twenty-five new 
rural schoolhouses have been built at an average cost of $705..56. There has 
been an increase of 601 in the number of houses equipped with patent desks, 
and $141,683.85 has been expended during the biennial period for school 
furniture. 



8 Two Ykars' Progress. 

Four and six-tenths days have been added to the average annual school 
term of the white schools of the State, and .7 day to the average annual 
school term of the colored schools of the State, 3.5 days to the white rural 
school term, and 9.7 days to the white city school term. In the newly estab- 
lished local-tax districts, of course, the school term has been greatly lengthened 
and in many instances doubled. There has been an increase of 594 in the 
number of white teachers employed, and 18 in the number of colored teachers 
employed. There has been an increase of .$10.92 in the average annual salary 
of white teachers, and $5.21 in the average annual salary of colored teachers. 
The average annual salary of rural teachers has been increased $13.88. 
There has been a necessary increase in the expenses of collecting, expending, 
and administering a larger fund, and an increase in the current expenses for 
longer terms with more schoolrooms and teachers. 

The total expenditures for all schools during 1910 was .$3,178,950.50, which 
represents an increase of $220,790.31 over 1908 — an increase of $250,469.45 in 
rural expenditures, and a decrease of $29,679.14 in urban expenditures. Of 
this increase, rural teachers and superintendents received $192,194.18. and 
urban teachers and superintendents $85,053.60. The increased expenditures 
for administration, including treasurer's commissions, the expenses of boards 
of education, school committeemen, and taking census, was $6,138.67 for rural 
schools, and $452.73 for city schools. The increase in expenditures for all 
other purposes, including overchai'ges arising from overestimates of poll tax. 
errors in treasurers" commissions, etc., borrowed money for building, teachers' 
salaries, etc., repaid out of collected taxes, was $5,255.80 for rural schools ; and 
there was an increase of $99,424.09 for public high schools. This last item, 
however, does not represent the percentage of gi'owth, as a separate report was 
made in 1908 of all high-school expenditures, except county appropiiations. 
The increase is based on that. There was a decrease in tbe amounts spent 
for a few items, namely, buildings and supplies, and loans, in particular. 
When this is accounted for and taken from the items of increase above, the 
net gain in expenditures for the State is $220,790.31. 

Increase in Value of School Property.- — In 1910 the total value of school 
property of the State was $5,802,969. Of this amount the value of rural 
school property was $3,094,416, and the value of city school property was 
$2,768,553. This is an increase in 1910 over 1908 of $945,057 in the total 
value of all school i)roperty. of which $585,745 is the increase in the value of 
rural school property and $359,912 the increase in the value of city school 
property. The value of white school property in 1910 was $5,185,521, of 
which $2,700,911 was rural and $2,478,010 was city. The value of colored 
school propertj' was $677,448, of which $387,505 was rural and $289,943 was 
city. The percentage of increase in the valuation of school jiroperty during 
the biennial period is 19 per cent — 23 per cent rural and 15 per cent urban. 

In 1910 there were 7.609 schoolhouses in the Stat(^-7.350 rural and 2.59 
ui'ban ; 5,150 rural white and 109 urban white. 2,194 rural colored and 90 
urban colore<l. The average value of each rural white house was $525; the 
average value of each city white house was $14,606; the average value of 
each rural coloretl house was $176; the average value of each city colored 
house was $3,221. There has been an increase of $100 in the average value 
of each white rural schoolhouse and of $20 in the average value of each 
colored rural schoolhouse in 1910 over 190S. During the biennial period 



Two Years' Progress. 9 

$533,872.1(5 was expended for rural school buildings and sites, and $239,781.10 
for urban school buildings and sites — $482,714.74 for rural white and $51,157.42 
for rural colored ; $210,804.19 for urban white and $28,970.91 for urban colored. 

New Schoolhouses Built. — During the biennial period, 725 new rural school- 
houses have been built — 564 white and 1(51 colored — at a cost of $511,530.58. 
A total of 725 new schoolhouses for this bieiuiial period means an average of 
one new house for each day of each year, Sundays included. This pace of 
building a new schoolhouse for every day in the year, according to approved 
plans of modern school architecture, prepared by most competent architects 
and distributed from the office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, has been maintained for the past eight years. 

Increase in School Furniture and Equipment. — During this biennial period 
.f229,450.40 has been expended for school furniture and necessary equipment, 
an increase of $01,981 in the expenditures for this purpose over the preceding 
l)iennial period. In 1910 there were 2,170 rural schoolhouses equipped with 
modern school furniture — 2,022 white and 148 colored — an increase of 535 
white and. GO colored over 1908. Four thousand one hundred and twenty-six 
rural schoolhouses were reported furnished with home-made desks — 2,791 
white and 1,335 colored. 

Increase in Local-tax Districts and Funds Raised by Local Taxation. — Dur- 
ing this biennial period, 288 local-tax districts have been established by volun- 
tary vote of the people in rural communities and small towns, an average of 
2.8 districts a week for each week in each year. This is an increase of 59 
local-tax districts over the preceding biennial period, and makes a total of 995 
local-tax districts in the State on July 1, 1910. 

In 1910, $877,899.91, about 23 per cent of the total annual school fund, 
was raised by local taxation, $296,914.03 in rural districts and $580,885.28 in 
urban districts. All counties of the State, except three, now have from 1 to 
47 local-tax districts each, levying special taxes therein to supplement their 
apportionments from the State and county fund for longer terms, better houses 
and equipment, better teachers paid better salaries, for better schools. 

Increase in Enrollment and Attendance. — The increase in the school census 
of 1910 over that of 1908 was 19,452—13,102 white and 0,290 colored. The 
increase in the school enrollment was 22,088 — 13,540 white and 9,142 colored. 
The increase in average daily attendance was 22,847 — 15,501 white and 7,346 
colored. These figures indicate that the increase in enrollment and average 
daily attendance is more than keeping pace with the increase in the school 
population, especially in the white schools. 

Increase in Length of School Term and in the Average Salary of Teachers. 
In 1910 the average length of school term in rural white schools was 92.7 days, 
in the city white schools 175.2 days, and in all white schools of the State 104.6 
days ; in the rural colored schools 81J days ; in the city colored schools 1(54.8 
days, and in all colored schools of the State 93.7 days. This is an increase 
over 1908 of 3.5 days in the average length of the school term in the rural 
white schools, 9.7 days in the city white schools, 4.6 days in all white schools 
of the State; a decrease of .4 day in rural colored schools, an increase of 1.7 
days in city colored schools, and an increase of .7 day in all colored schools of 
the State. The average length of school term in the white rural local-tax 
school districts is 129 days. 



10 Two Years' Progress. 

Taking these figures as a basis of calculation, it will be seen that the average 
monthly salary of white rural teachers in 1910 was $34.47, an increase of 
$2.23 over 1908. The average monthly salary of white city teachers was $42.72, 
a decrease of $2.32 from 190S. The average monthly salary of rural colored 
teachers was $23.48, an increase of $1 over 1908 ; the average monthly salary of 
city colored teachers was $30.64, an increase of 44 cents over 1908. 

As stated above, tliere has been an increase of 612 in the number of teachers 
employed — 594 white and IS colored. 

Improvement in Teachers' Institutes and Other Facilities for Teacher- 
training. — Under amendments to the school law by the General Assembly of 
1909, a two-weeks teachers' institute was made mandatory in every county 
biennially. Teachers' institutes were held in 30 counties in 1809 and in 60 
counties in 1910, attended by 6,553 teachers. With the aid of the Super- 
visor of Teacher-training, also made possible by an amendment to the law in 
1909, the work of the county teachers' institutes and the county teachers' as- 
sociations has been organized and systematized, and, through teachers' reading 
circles, a valuable course of home study and home training for the professional 
improvement of the rank and file of the teachers is being successfully con- 
ducted. Teachers' associations, holding moTuthly meetings, are in successful 
operation in 91 counties. 3Iost of these associations have also organized 
teachers' reading circles for pursuing the prescribed course of professional 
reading. 

A trained man and a trained woman have been appointed to conduct each of 
these county teachers' institutes. All institute workers have been required to 
attend a conference of three or four days with the State Superintendent and 
the Supervisor of Teacher-training, for the discussion of their worli and the 
arrangement of uniform and definite plans of work, before beginning the insti- 
tutes, and have been furnished with bulletins containing definite outlines and 
approved suggestions for the work of the institutes. Under this plan, there hns 
been marked progress in the organization and direction of this institute work. 
It has been uniform, practical, and progressive, with more teaching and demon- 
stration and less lecturing, with more emphasis on the essential subjects and 
less on the frills. 

The reports received from these institutes have been the most encouraging 
ever received by the State Superintendent. They have been more largely 
attended and the teachers have been more interested and benefited than ever 
before. A fuller report "of this institute and teacher-training work, by the 
Supervisor of Teacher-training, is printed elsewhere in this Report. An attempt 
has been made, with encouraging success, to correlate and coordinate the work 
of these agencies for home study and professional improvement of teachers — 
the teachers' institute, the county teachers' association, and reading circles, to 
plan the work so as to make it more progressive and continuous from year to 
year. XortJi Carolina Education, our ofiicial State teachers' journal, is heartily 
cooperating and rendering valuable assistance in carrying on this work. 

Improvement in County Supervision. — There has been an increase in the 
number of county superintendents giving their entire time to the work of super- 
vision and an increase in the time devoted to their work by nearly all other 
county superintendents. Forty-three county superintendents now devote their 
entire time to their work. The county superintendents are thoroughly 
organized into a State and district associations, holding annual meetings for 



Two Years' Progress. 11 

the dismssiou with each other and with the State Saperiiitencleut of thoir coiii- 
mou problems, for au exchange of views and experiences, for umtual counsel 
aud adA'ice, and for the forming of plans for carrying on more uniformly and 
successfully the great work of educating all the people in the schools of all the 
people. It has seemed to me that during this biennial period the county super- 
intendents have improved in the efficient and intelligent discharge of their 
duties, and that, on the whole, they have manifested a fine spirit of loyalty and 
devotion to their work. Much progress has been made in the organization, 
training, and direction of their teaching force and in the systematization, clas- 
sification, and gradation of the work in the rural schools. 

Progress in Rural Public High Schools. — During the biennial period 14 new 
public high schools have been established, making a total of 170 such schools in 
87 counties of the State. There are, therefore, now only 11 comities that do not 
have one or more of these schools. The annual State appropriation for their 
maintenance was increased $5,000 in 1900, making the total annual State ap- 
propriation for them $50,000. During the biennial period $240,040.51 has been 
expended for the maintenance of these schools. 

The total' enrollment of country boys and girls in them has been 5,282 in 
1909, and 5,775 in 1910, a total of 11,057 for the biennial period — 5,182 boys and 
5,875 girls. This is au increase of 1,82G in the total enrollment of 1910 over 
, the enrollment of 1908, an increase of 41 per cent in enrollment. There has 
been an average daily attendance of 3,787 in 1909, and 4,145 in 1910. The 
percentage of enrollment in average daily attendance has been 71 per cent for 
the two years. 

In connection with some of these high schools, dormitories have been built 
and equipped, in which high-school students can secure board at actual cost and^ 
pay for it in money or in provisions at the market price. 

These figures show an encouraging increase in enrollment and attendance 
upon these public high schools, indicating a commendable growth in public sen- 
timent among the rural population for high-school education, for the elevation 
of the average of intelligence, and for better preparation for citizenship and 
service. A full report of these public high schools, prepared by the State 
Inspector of Public High Schools, is printed in another part of thi^ Report. 

Increase in Rural Libraries.^ — During the biennial period 528 new rural libra- 
ries have been established, costing $1G,S40, containing an average of about 100 
volumes of well-selected books. Seventy-six new supplemental libraries have 
been added to libraries formerly established, costing $1,140, adding about 35 
books to each of these libraries. The total number of rural libraries in the 
State at the close of the biennial period was 2.420, the total number of sup- 
plemental libraries 428. More than one-thii'd of all the school districts in the 
State, white and colored, are now provided with rural libraries. 

Loan Fund for Building Schoolhouses. — During the biennial period the total 
amount of new loans made from the ^tate Loan Fund for Building and Im- 
proving Public School Houses is $122,000 to 65 counties, for building and 
improving houses, A-alued at $290,49.5. The total amount of loans made from 
this Loan Fund since its establishment in 1903 aggregates $523,280.50 to 89 
counties, for building and improving 995 houses, valued at $1,265,788. 

This fund continues to be of incalculable service in building and improving 
public school houses, the loans from it often making possible at once much 
needed new houses where they would not otherwise be possible without clo.s- 



12 Two Years' Progress, 

ing the schools and using the entire apportionment to the district for one 
or more j^ears for building. A timely loan from this fund also often means 
to a district the difference between a poor, cheap house, and a good, properly- 
constructed house. A full detailed report of the Loan Fund is printed else- 
where in this Report. 

Enlargement of the Work of the State Department of Public Instruction. 
The work of this Department has been enlarged and increased in efficiency : 
First, by the addition of a trained man as Insiiector and Supervisor of Ele- 
mentary Rural Schools, working under the direction of the State Superintend- 
ent and in cooperation with him and the county superintendents for the 
improvement of these schools, giving his entire time to a careful investigation 
and study of their conditions, their needs, and means of improving them. His 
salary and expenses are generously provided out of the Peabody Fund. 

Second, by the addition of a trained, experienced, professional teaclier as 
supervisor of the teacher-training work of the Department, giving his entire 
time to the supervision and direction of the work of the county teachers' 
institutes, the county teachers' associations, the teachers' reading circles, and 
to the general supervision of the three State Colored Normal Schools and 
the Croatan Indian Normal School. 

Third, by the addition of a competent man of special training and experience 
as supervisor of the agricultural work in the public schools, woi'king in 
cooperation with the State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, the 
State Department of Agriculture, and the Demonstration Department of the 
United States Department of Agriculture, and giving his entire time, in 
cooperation with the State Superintendent and the county superintendents, to 
the organization and direction of Boys' Corn Clubs, the stimulation of agri- 
cultural instruction in the public schools, the cultivation of public sentiment for 
agricultural and industrial education. His salary and expenses are gener- 
ously provided by the General Education Board. 

As will appear from reports of their work elsewhere, all of these men have 
proved most valuable additions to the educational force of the State Depart- 
ment, and made most valuable contributions to the educational work of the 
State. 

Boys' Corn Clubs and Increased Interest in Agricultural Instruction. — 
With the aid of Prof. I. O. Schaub, Supervisor of Agricultural Extension Work 
in the Public Schools, and the active cooperation of county superintendents and 
public school teachers. Boys' Corn Clubs have been organized in 60 counties, 
enrolling l,.57o boys. The following is an extract from Mr. Schaub's report : 

"Eighty-five boys made over 75 bushels of corn per acre and will win one of 
the Governor's certificates. One boy made 146 bushels at a cost of $40.20, and 
won the free trip to Washington, where he was presented with a certificate 
from the United States Department of Agriculture. Most of the county super- 
intendents have cooperated heartily and deserve great credit for the success 
of the work." 

Practical Instruction in Public Health and Hygiene. — With the valuable 
assistance and cooperation of the State Board of Health and its eflBcient and 
energetic secretary and assistant secretaries, much valuable work has been 
done in the public schools in increasing interest and giving instruction in 
public health and hygiene. Bulletins, dealing in a concise, simple, and practical 
way with the simple hygienic law's affecting the everyday life of the child 



Two Years' Progress. 13 

and the people, have been prepared under the direction of the Secretary of the 
State Board of Health, and printed and distributed to teachers of the State 
by the State Department of Public Instruction. A list of these bulletins will 
be found under Educational Literature. 

Directions have been given to the teachers, through the county superintend- 
ents, to make use of these bulletins for the systematic instruction of the chil- 
dren of their schools in public health and hygiene, and to give to the entire 
school at least three brief health talks a week, the information for which, 
progressively and logically arranged, has been furuishe<.l them in the Health 
Talks Bulletin. Teachers have also been notified that they will be held respon- 
sible for this work, and will be examined on the contents of these health bul- 
letins as a part of their regular examination in physiology and hygiene for 
teachers' certificates. 

This health and hygiene work is a long step forward toward the improvement 
of sanitary conditions and public health in the rural districts. County superin- 
tendents and public-school teachers have responded intelligently and enthusi- 
astically to the call for it. Emphasis was laid upon this worli in the county 
teachers' institutes and special attention is being given to it in tlie county 
teachers' associations. 

By addresses and tallvs to teachers and to the general public, the secretary 
and the assistant secretary to the State Board of Health and the physicians of 
the State generally are aiding greatly in this campaign for the instruction of 
the children and the people of the State in public health and hygiene and in 
the cultivation of public sentiment therefor. It is impossible to calculate how 
much can be done, through simple instruction, line upon line, precept upon 
precept, for the rising generation in the public schools for the prevention and 
eradication of typhoid fever, tuberculosis, hookworm disease, scarlet fever, 
smallpox, diphtheria, and other preventable diseases that constitute the chief 
scourges of our population. The sentiment is rapidly growing and the demand 
rapidly increasing that such instruction shall be made an essential and organic 
part of our educational work. 

Campaign for Education.— The campaign for education, by bulletins, through 
the press, and by public addresses, has been carried on without cessation. The 
State Superintendent has used all the time that he could spare from his work 
ill the office for field work and educational campaign work. Through the 
continuance of the generous aid of the Southern Education Board, in pro- 
viding funds for the payment of their expenses, strong spealvers, who gen- 
erously contributed their services, have been sent to every community asking 
for the agitation of the question of local taxation and the consolidation of 
schools, and to communities in which elections on the question of local taxation 
for public schools were pending. Among these speakers have been represent- 
ative teachers, editors, lawyers, preachers, business men. public officials, and 
others. The campaign has been under the direction of the Campaign Com- 
mittee for the Promotion of Public Education in North Carolina, of which 
the State Superintendent of Public Instruction is chairman, and Hon. C. H. 
Mebane, of the State Department of Public Instruction, is secretary. Exclusive 
of the large number of educational addresses by the State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, under the direction of the committee, 120 educational 
addresses have been made in 65 counties during the past two years. 

In many counties, of course, enthusiastic and consecrated county superin- 



14 Two Years' Progress. 

tendents have carried on almost continuously effective campaigns for public 
education and scliool improvement, by personal work, public addresses, circular- 
letters, newspaper articles, etc. In this work many of them have been assisted 
by consecrated teachers and public-spirited citizens of all classes and vocations. 
After all, the most effective part of this campaign is that carried on from 
year's end to year's end, without blare of trumpets, in the county, under the 
direction of an efficient county superintendent of common sense and conse- 
cration. 

Woman's Association for the Betterment of Public School Houses and 
Grounds. — With the aid of funds generously donated from the Peabody Fund. 
Mrs. Charles D. Mclver has been employed during the past two years as field 
secretary of the Woman's Betterment Association, giving her entire time and 
her devoted service to this work. Marked progress has been made. Many new 
county associations have been organized. Through the unselfish work of the 
patriotic women of the State, county and local associations, thousands of dol- 
lars have been raised for the improvement of schoolhouses and grounds, and 
much valuable voluntary service that cannot be measured in dollars and cents 
has been rendered in making the schoolrooms and the school grounds more 
beautiful and attractive, and in cultivating public sentiment and public interest 
for the betterment of the public schools. Many county superintendents, public 
school teachers, county boards of education, and school committeemen have 
given their hearty cooperation to the women in this work. 

In the county of Wake alone, $6,021.18 was raised during the year 1910 by 
the women of the Betterment Association for the improvement of the public 
schools. In many districts the women secured the cultivation of the school 
farms in cotton and tobacco, making hundreds of dollars for the schools ; and, 
in some instances, the women of the association picked the cotton with their 
own hands. If space permitted, interesting and inspiring reports of similar 
work in other counties could be made. 

Important Educational Legislation. — The General Assembly of 1909 increased 
the annual State appropriation for public schools $25,000, without a dissenting 
vote in either branch of the General Assembly. The State appropriation for 
public high schools was increased $5,000. The law was amended, changing the 
method of apportioning the special annual State appropriation of $100,000 to 
equalize school terms and secure a four-months school term in every public- 
school district, so as to require all counties receiving aid from this appropria- 
tion to levj^ and collect a special tax on all property and polls of the county 
sufficient to provide one-half the- deficit needed for a four-months school, except 
that the special tax levied for this purpose was limited to a maximum of 5 
cents on the $100 valuation of property and 15 cents on the poll, and counties 
levying this maximum are entitled to receive all the balance needed for a four- 
months school. This required special tax has increased the annual school fund 
for a four-months term in the weak counties about $105,9G9.GT. 

The terms of the members of the county boards of education were changed to 
two, four, and six years, respectively, so as to have the term of only one 
member expiring every two years, instead of having the terms of all three mem- 
bers expiring every two years, thereby retaining a majority of old, experienced 
members of the board each year, preventing the possibility of a radical change 
in the educational policy of the county every two years and the danger of mis- 
takes from the administration of school affairs by new and inexperienced men. 



Two Yeaks^ Progress. 15 

Under this hnv, tbe eouuty board of education will have at all times, unless 
they should resign, at least two members of not less than two years' experi- 
ence in the management of the public schools. This ought to contribute to the 
permanency, continuity, and progress of the educational work of each county, 
and aid in removing the county school system further from i)artisan and fac- 
tional politics every two years. 

An amendment was made to the county institute law, making a county 
teachers' institute in every county mandatory biennially, and not oftener. Pro- 
vision was also made for increasing the salary and enlarging the duties of the 
Superintendent of the State Colored and Croatan Indian Normal Schools, add- 
ing to his duties the supervision and direction, in cooperation with the State 
Superintendent, of the entire teacher-training work of the State Department of 
Public Instruction, including the county teachers' institute work, the county 
teachers' association work, the teachers' reading circles, etc. 

The rural library law was so amended as to allow the use of the accumulated 
balance of the biennial appropriation for supplemental libraries at the end of 
each biennial period for the establishment of new rural libraries. 

The compulsory attendance law of 1907 was so amended as to allow com- 
pulsory attendance to be ordered by the county board of education, in its dis- 
cretion, under the provisions of the act, upon petition of a majority of the 
parents of children of school age, without the delay, the expense, the trouble, 
or the friction of an election ; and further, so as to authorize the county board 
of education, of its own motion, to order compulsory attendance, without peti- 
tion or election, in districts in which the em*ollment and daily attendance fall 
below a certain per cent, thereby furnishing prima facie evidence of the need 
of it and of such indifference to education and lack of interest in it in those 
districts as would render it unlikely that it could be secured by petition or 
election. 

To sum up, the important educational legislation of the period increased the 
public school fund by special appropriation from the State Treasury and special 
county taxation ; provided a more satisfactory, more efficient, and more etiuita- 
ble method of distributing the second .$100,000 for a four-months school, guar- 
anteeing thereby a full and efficient school term in every district;; rendered 
more effective the compulsory attendance act of 1907 ; greatly improved the 
provisions for the home training of teachers; increased the efficiency of the 
educational administration of the county by changing the terms of office of the 
members of the county boards of education. 

Educational Literature. — During the two years the following educational 
literature has been prepared and sent out from the Superintendent's office : 

Program of North Carolina Day, 190S. 95 pages. 

Program of North Carolina Day, 1909. G7 pages. 

Approved Books for Ptural Libraries, 1909. 44 pages. 

Plans for Public Schoolhouses, 1908. tiO pages. 

Public School Statistics, 1909. 129 pages. 

Betterment of Public Schoolhouses, 1910. 24 pages. 

Handbook for High-school Teachers, 1908. 87 pages. 

The Public School Law (Revised), 1909. 96 pages. 

Directory of School Officials, 1910. 37 pages. 

A Manual of Physiology and Hygiene in Primary Grades. 1909. 38 pages. 

Opening Exercises in Public Schools, 1909. 32 pages. 



16 Two Yeaks^ Progress. 

Washington's Birthday, 1909. 48 pages. 

Teachers' Reading Circle, 190f». 20 pages. 

Teachers' Reading Circle, 1910. 14 pages. 

A Manual for Teachers' Institutes, 1909. 07 pages. 

A Manual for Teachers' Institutes, 1910. 102 pages. 

Course of Study for the Elementary Public Schools, 1909. 84 pages. 

How to Teach Reading, 1909. 41 pages. 

Eyes and Ears, 1910. 26 pages. 

Ground-itch, or Hookworm Disease, 1910. 27 pages. A 

Health Talks in Public Schools, 1910. 30 pages. 

First Annual Report of the State Inspector of Public High Schools, 1908. 

46 pages. 

Second Annual Report of the State Inspector of Public High Schools, 1909. 

47 pages. 

Proceedings and Addresses of Jsorth Carolina Teachers' Assembly, 1909. 
233 pages. 

Proceedings and Addresses of North Carolina Teachers' Assembly, 1910. 
256 pages. 

Biennial Report of Superintendent of Public Instruction, 19O0-190S. 240 
pages. 

Young People's Farm-life Clubs, 1909. 11 pages. 

Child Study as an Aid to Teaching, 1910. 22 pages. 

Educating for Farm Life, 1910. 12 pages. 

Book Depositories and List of Books for the Public Schools, 1908. 21 pages. 

Besides the foregoing, blanks covering every phase of school organization 
and work have been sent out. These have aided all school officials in keeping 
their records and making accurate reports of the work done. The eiTorts along 
this line have secured the gradation of at least three-fourths of all the rural 
schools, which means a great saving of time to the children who attend these 
schools. 



RECOMMENDATIONS. 



To aid iu the accomplishment of some of the work here outiiued lor the 
progress and development of the public school system, I beg to make the fol- 
lowing recommendations : 

1. That there shall be no radical changes in the present general public 
school law. Some additions seem to be necessary, but there should be no 
more changes than are absolutely necessary. The people and the school offi- 
cers are beginning to become acquainted with the law and to be familiar 
with its workings. It will be wise to seek to continue progress along the lines 
already marked out by the present school law and to follow a permanent 
educational policy. 

2. That the General Assembly appropriate not less than $50,000 annually 
to aid iu the establishment and maintenance of county farm-life high schools, 
iu conjunction with the best and most conveniently located of the existing high 
schools iu those counties complying with the conditions, to be prescribed in tlie 
law, for the adequate equipment and maintenance of such schools. A full dis- 
cussion of these schools, of the cost of their equipment and maintenance, the 
reasons for their establishment, the benefits of them, the conditions to be pre- 
scribed iu the law for the counties securing them, etc., will be found elsewhere 
iu this Report, under the heading "Farm-life Schools." 

3. That the annual State appropriation for public high schools be increased 
$25,000, to meet the present needs of the constantly increasing patronage of 
these schools, which will appear from the report of the State Inspector of 
Public High Schools, published elsewhere in this Report. 

4. That the provisions for training the teacliing force of the State be fur- 
ther enlarged and improved by requiring the University, the State Normal 
and Industrial College, the A. and M. Colleges, and all the Normal Schools 
of the State to conduct summer schools as a part of their regular work, open 
without charge for tuition to all public-school teachers and all persons pre- 
paring for teaching. That provision be made for such summer schools in the 
annual appropriations for these institutions as a part of the annual budget 
of necessary expenses. That the courses of study tlaerein be correlated, as 
far as possible, with the work of the county teachers' institutes and county 
teachers' associations and the regular work of these institutions. These in- 
stitutions are so located as to place a summer school, under this plan, within 
easy access of the teachers of every section of the State by utilizing the ex- 
pensive State plants that have heretofore remained idle three or four months 
each year. 

5. That, on account of the increased cost of living, the higher standard of 
requirements for certification of teachei-s, and the difficulty of securing quali- 
fied teachers, the law be so amended as to fix the maximum salary of second- 
grade teachers at $30, instead of $25. 

6. That the law relating to coimty teachers' institutes be so amended as to 
require all teachers of all counties of the State to attend some county insti- 
tute, or properly accredited summer school, at least once in two years, unless 
providentially prevented, and to forbid any county superintendent to issue a 
certificate, or approve a certificate to teach in the public schools, or any 

Part 1—2 



18 Recommendations. 

school committee to employ any teacher until such a certificate of attend- 
ance upon some county institute or some properlj* accredited summer school 
shall be exhibited and accepted. 

7. That the law relating to the adoption of text-books for use in the public 
schools be amended as follows : 

a. By requiring the establishment of one or more joint State depositories 
for the more convenient and expeditious supply of books to the local deposito- 
ries in the various counties of the State ; and that contracting publishers be 
required to furnish books to local depositories on consignment, if necessary, 
in order to secure the placing of the books within convenient reach of the 
patrons of the rural schools. 

6. That the subcommission shall contain at least two representative pri- 
mary teachers of the State, three representative county superintendents, and 
two representative city superintendents, actively engaged in school work. That 
the members of the subcommission shall meet in joint session with the Text- 
book Commission for the adoption of books, and shall constitute a part of 
that Commission, with full authority as members thereof for the adoption of 
books. 

c. That the law be so amended as to include city schools as well as rural 
schools in the adoption. 

Under the present text-book law, the subcommission, composed of profes- 
sional teachers, is directed to consider only the merits of the books and to 
report their ratings according to merit, and are forbidden to consider price, 
the expense of changes to the taxpayers and the patrons of the schools, and 
other practical considerations of that sort. The Text-book Commission, com- 
posed of the State officers constituting the State Board of Education, only 
one of whom is a professional teacher, is directed to consider the price, the 
expense of changes and other practical considerations, and are in no sense 
bound by the report of the subcommission, except by the general direction 
that they shall give due consideration to that report. The difference in view- 
point of these two separate boards — one an exclusively professional board, 
instructed to consider and report on the professional merit of the books only, 
without any voice in the final adoption, and the other a nonprofessional 
board, upon which is specifically imposed the duty of considering also the 
price, the expense of changes in books, and other such practical considera- 
tions—has necessarily produced variations between the recommendations of 
one board and the adoptions of the other that have given opportunity for mis- 
understandings and criticisms that, in my opinion, can be avoided by the con- 
solidation of the two boards, so that each may better imderstand the view- 
point of the other, and in the final adoption may wisely view the matter from 
both viewpoints. 

I believe that wisdom and justice demand that the teachers should have 
a voice in the final adoption of the tools with which they are to work ; that 
the members of the State Board of Education, elected by the people, directly 
responsible to the people, guardians of the financial interests of the State 
and of the people, responsible under the Constitution for the educational 
policy and the administration of the educational system of the State, should 
also have a voice in the adoption of text-books for the public schools. 

Having been chairman of the first subcommission in 1901, before I was a 
member of the State Board of Education and Text-book Commission, and hav- 



RECSbMMENDATIOXS. 19 

ing been, in 1906, when the second book adoption was made, State Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction, and therefore a member of the State Board of 
Education and the Text-boolc Connnisslon, 1 feel tlint my experience has pre- 
pared me to appreciate the difference in viewpoint, making possible perfectly 
honest variations between the recommendations of the subcommission and the 
adoptions of the Text-book Commission. My experience has convinced me 
that the best results will be obtained from adoption by a joint board, such as 
I have recommended, each acting as a balance wheel to the other, thereby 
avoiding mistakes from an undue emphasis of theoretical merits of the books 
on the one hand and undue emphasis of practical considerations of price and 
expense of changes on the other. 

Having been intimately associated with the members of the State Board of 
Education, and having heard and taken part in all the discussions of the 
Text-book Commission during the adoption in 1906, I deem it due them, as the 
one representative of the teaching profession on the Text-book Commission, 
to say here, in view of certain criticisms in some of the newspapers, liable 
to create a wrong impression in the public mind and to do these men an in- 
justice, that, though I differed from a majority of them about some of the 
adoptions, I have never been associated with men in the discharge of any 
duty that, in my opinion, were more honest and conscientious in the discharge 
of that duty. It was an unpleasant duty imposed upon them by the law, 
without their influence, request, or desire, of which every one of them, of my 
own knowledge, would gladly have been relieved, and would now gladly be 
relieved. These men are created by the Constitution the State Board of 
Education. During my administration they have taken an active interest in 
all educational matters and have given me, as State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, wise counsel and warm support. They are entitled to a large 
part of whatever credit may be due to the State educational administration 
for the educational progress since I have been State Superintendent of Pviblic 
Instruction. 

I recommend the addition of representative members of the teaching pro- 
fession to the Text-book Commission, and I earnestly desire the -benefit of 
the counsel and aid of representatives of my profession upon all matters 
pertaining to the educational administration of the State, but not to the 
exclusion of honest, capable, and patriotic men whom the people, by their 
Constitution and their votes, have designated as their representatives in the 
administration of the educational affairs of the State. 

A comparison of the books adopted by the State Text-book Commission in 
1906 with the report of the subcommission will show that the Text-book Com- 
mission evidently gave careful consideration to the recommendations of the 
professional board, and that the only deviations from the recommendations 
of that board were in the adoption of the text-books on Reading, Geogyaphy, 
History, Spelling, and Arithmetic. 

In Reading, the first choice of the minority of three members of the sub- 
commission was adopted. The first two of the series of five i-eaders adopted 
was also the second choice of the majority of four members of the sub- 
commission, the others of the adopted series being their third choice. 

In Geography the two books recommended as first choice by the entire sub- 
commission were adopted. Four members of the subcommission recommended 



20 Eecommendations. 

the adoption of a third book, making a three-boolv series instead of a two, 
while the minority of three members reported against this, favoring the two- 
book series. 

The only deviation from the report of the entire subcommission on United 
States History was in the selection of a primai-y history, the second choice 
of the subcommission being selected instead of their first choice. The book 
adopted, however, was recommended as a most meritorious book in all re- 
spects, and was selected by the Text-book Commission mainly because the 
majority of the members preferred its treatment of certain topics of North 
Carolina history to the treatment of the same topics in the book recom- 
mended as first choice. 

In Spelling, the second choice of the subcommission was adopted instead of 
the first choice, both books being recommended as meritorious, the second 
choice being preferred and adopted by the Text-book Commission probably 
because it was by North Carolina authors and published by North Carolina 
publishers. 

In Arithmetic, the subcommission recommended strongly a three-book series, 
and reported as their first choice a three-book series. Their second choice 
was a two-book series, and the only other three-book series reported as worthy 
of consideration was Colaw and Ellwood's, which was reported as their third 
choice. This series was the series already in use in the public schools of the 
State, and the adoption of it was favored by the majority of the Text-book 
Commission because they thought that the difference between the two series 
did not justify the expense of a change from an old to a new series. 

In Agriculture, Drawing, Writing, English, Physiology and Hygiene, and 
all other subjects, the Text-book Commission, in their adoption of the text- 
books, followed to the letter the report of the subcommission, adopting in 
each ease its unanimous first choice. 

8. It is, in my opinion, just and wise that wherever equally well qualified 
men can be found in the minority party, representation should be given to 
both of the leading political parties upon county boards of education, since 
the schools, maintained by the taxes of all the people, patronized by the 
children of all the people, irrespective of their political views, need for their 
success the hearty support and interest of all the people, and should, there- 
fore, be removed as far as possible from partisan politics, and administered 
by a board as nonpartisan as is consistent with the constitutional require- 
ment of a uniform system of education and the responsibility of the major- 
ity political party of the State for the successful administration of that 
system in every county of the State. The method of selecting county boards 
of education should be made uniform. By special legislation, six counties 
now elect their county boards of education. 

9. That the law regulating the distribution of the second hundred thousand 
dollars to aid in securing a four-months school term in every school dis- 
trict be so amended as to change the maximum special tax required of 
counties sharing in its distribution from- 5 cents on the $100 valuatioii of 
property to 10 cents. This law would affect only 28 counties, receiving much 
more from this appropriation than they raise by special taxation, and most 
of these Avould still receive more from the State than they raise, after re- 
quiring a levy of the maximum of 10 cents. This increase in the maxinnmi 
in these counties that receive most from the State appropriation seems to 



Recommendations. 21 

be necessary to provide the full amount needed to guarantee each year a 
full four-months term in every school district iu these counties, and in the 
3G counties that raise more by a special tax and receive less from the second 
hundred thousand dollars than these. It would seem that the amount of self- 
help required of the counties should be somewhat proportionate to the amount 
received from the State for a four-months school term — -those receiving most 
levying most, and those receiving least levying least. 

10. That the law be so amended as to authorize any coimty to vote a 
special tax for lengthening its school term and improving its schoolhouses 
and schools, with a proviso that the voting of such a tax for the entire county 
shall not interfere with existing local-tax districts or with the establishment 
of other local-tax districts under the general law ; and with a further pro- 
viso authorizing the special annual tax levy in existing local-tax districts to 
be reduced upon the recommendation of the committees of those districts iu 
counties voting such a special tax for the entire county so as to prevent a 
burdensome tax in such districts. 

11. That the law relating to the State Board of Examiners for the exami- 
nation and certification of high-school teachers and of applicants for the 
Five-year State Teacher's Certificate be amended so as to permit the mem- 
bers of that board to give the additional time needed for the increased work 
of the board, and so as to allow not exceeding $300 for the secretary of the 
board for his increasing labors incident to the rapidly increasing work of 
the board. 

12. That the State tax for public schools be increased from IS cents on the 
$100 valuation of property to 25 cents. This increase will lengthen the 
school term and greatly improve the school facilities, provide for the employ- 
ment of more and better teachers at better salaries, largely reduce the num- 
ber of counties now required to levy a special tax for a four-months school, 
and greatly reduce the amount of the special tax required to be levied for a 
four-months school in the small number of counties in which such a special 
tax would still be necessary. It would also decrease the amount borae by the 
few stronger counties for a four-mouths school in the counties now receiving 
aid from the second hundred thousand dollars. In fact, in a few years, with 
this increase in the general State tax for public schools, every county in the 
State ought to be able to have a four-months school without aid from the 
second hundred thousand dollars ; aud the second hundred thousand dollars, 
like the first one hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars, could be appor- 
tioned to all the counties according to the school population of each, to 
lengthen the term and strengthen the schools. With this increase and with 
the constantly increasing tax valuations of the State, it ought to be possible 
within the next few years to bring the minimum school term to six months. 

13. That the law be so amended as to^authorize county boards of education 
to provide for consolidation of schools and transportation of pupils where the 
conditions and the available school funds justify it. 

14. That the following minor amendments to the school law be made: 

a. That section 4164 be so amended as to require that one of the tv\'o com- 
mitteemen required to sign all vouchers shall be the secretary of the com- 
mittee, thereby enabling him to keep accurately the account of the school 
funds of the disti'ict. 



22 Recommendations. 

J). That section 4124 be so amended as to require ttie County Board of Edu- 
cation to insure aud keep insured all schooUiouses valued at more than $350. 

c. That section 4148 be so amended as to require a biennial, instead of an 
annual, census to be taken on or before July 1st. The school population does 
not change enough in one year to justify the expense of $12,000 or $14,000 
for an annual census. 

d. That section 4141 be so amended as to require the attendance of county 
superintendents at the meetings of the district associations, for conference 
with each other and with the State Superintendent about their work. 

e. That section 4165 be so amended as to require the teacher to return at 
the close of the school term the school register, and to forbid the County 
Superintendent from signing the final voucher for salary until the register, 
properly kept and concluded for the tex*m, as required by law, shall be filed 
with him. 

/. That section 4155 be so amended as to authorize the County Superin- 
tendent to administer to teachers and school committeemen the oaths required 
by law for their vouchers and reports. 




2i 



2; 



U 



m 

1^ 
O 

fa 

o 



72 






WORK TO BE DONE AND HOW TO DO IT. 



Notwithstanding tlie encouraging progress along all former lines and the 
encouraging beginning along new lines of educational worli during the past two 
years, as revealed by the othcial reports, the work to be done and the ways and 
means of doing it have not been materially changed since my preceding report. 
As I discussed most of these subjects somewhat fully and to the best of my 
ability in that report, basing my discussion and suggestions on the most careful 
study of our educational conditions that I have been able to make, T have 
deemed it wisest to bring forward, with some changes and additions, parts of 
my previous biennial report. This is the work to be done, as I see it ; these 
are the ways and means of doing it, as I see them. I can do no better than to 
cry aloud and spare not until the General Assembly and the people hear and 
heed these suggestions or in their wisdom find and adopt some better ways of 
doing this needetl work. 

Thorough-ness in Essentials. — The foundation of all education is, of course, 
a mastery of the rudiments of knowledge — the elementary branches of reading, 
writing, arithmetic and spelling. A knowledge of these and the training and 
development which comes from the effort necessary for the acquisition of such 
knowledge are absolutely essential for every human being. It is folly to talk 
about higher education or special training along any line for any useful sphere 
of life or work until the children have secured at least this much instruction. 
According to the United States Census of 1900, 19.5 per cent of the white popu- 
lation and 47.5 per cent of the colored population over ten years of age in 
North Carolina could not read and write. While I have no doubt that we have 
greatly reduced this per cent of illiteracy during the past eight years, it is still 
painfully true that there is yet a large number of illiterates among us and a 
large number of , children on the straight road to illiteracy. 

A large majority of our country schools are still one-teacher schools. The 
average length of our rural school term is still only 89.9 days. Our chief atten- 
tion should, therefore, be given to doing thoroughly this foundatiQn work and 
making adequate provision for it. If the foundation be not well laid first, the 
entire educational structure must fall to pieces. 

The law now wisely forbids the teaching of any high-school subjects in any 
school having only one teacher. It requires, however, the teaching of thirteen 
subjects in these one-teacher schools. It is absolutely impossible for one 
teacher, with as many children as are to be found in the average rural school 
in seven grades, to do thorough work in so many subjects. It seems to me that 
the number of required subjects should be reduced, and that the teacher in 
every one-teacher school should be required to devote more time — in fact, most 
of the time — to teaching thoroughly these fundamental essentials of reading, 
writing, arithmetic and spelling. It is folly to attempt the impossible. In my 
opinion, at least the first four years of the elementary school with only one 
teacher should be devoted almost exclusively to these four subjects, sandwich- 
ing in just enough of geography, mainly in the form of nature study, talks on 
everyday hygiene, etc., to give a little variety to the course and to furnish some 
foundation for a little more extensive work in these and kindred subjects later. 

There is more educational value, more acquisition of power and of correct 



24 TV^oEK TO Be Doxe axd How to Do It. 

intellectual habits in a thorough mastery of a few subjects than in a super- 
ficial knowledge, a mere smattering, of many. The one lays the foundation for 
real culture; the other lays the foundation for nothing better than veneering. 
I am satisfied that there is great need for a substantial reform along this line 
in the required course of study in our elementary schools. The sensible teach- 
ers in the one-teacher schools are not attempting to teach this multiplicity of 
required subjects, and those who are attempting to teach all of these are failing 
to teach any as they should be taught. The law ought not to require a vain 
and foolish thing. 

Public High Schools. — Every child has the right to have the chance to de- 
velop to the fullest every faculty that God has endowed him with. It is to the 
highest interest of the State to place within the reach of every child this 
chance. By the evidence of the exiierience of all civilized lands of the past and 
the present, the study of the higher branches is necessary for the fullest devel- 
opment of these faculties. L'nless provided in the public schools, instruction in 
these cannot be placed within reach of nine-tenths of the children of North 
Carolina. If the great masses of our i)eople are to be limited in their education 
to the elementary branches only, we cannot hope for any material improvement 
in their intelligence and power and any material increase in their earning 
capacity. This State cannot expect to compete successfully with those States 
that have provided such instruction in their public schools for the highest and 
fullest development of all the powers of all their people. 

"The old idea that instruction in the public schools must be confined to the 
rudimentary branches only, or the three R's, as they were called, was born of 
the old false notion that the public schools were a public charity. This notion 
■put a badge of poverty upon the public-school system that was for many years 
the chief obstacle to the progress and development of public education in North 
Carolina. The notion still lingers in the minds of a few that at heart do not 
believe in the power and the rights of the many. It has no place in a real 
democracy. It must give place to that truer idea, accepted now in all pro- 
gressive States and lands, that public education is the highest governmental 
function — in fact, the chief concern of a good government. This was the con- 
ception of our wise old forefathers when they declared in their Constitution 
that 'Religion, morality, and knowledge being necessary to good government 
and the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall for- 
ever be encouraged,' and when they wrote into their Bill of Rights, 'The people 
have a right to the privilege of education, and it is the duty of the State to 
guard and maintain that right.' 

"No man in this age will dare maintain that instruction in the mere rudi- 
ments of learning can be called an education or that the people have been 
given the right to an education when instruction iu these branches only has 
been placed within their reach. Under this broader democratic conception of 
public education and its function the obligation of the Government to the 
poorest is as binding as its obligation to the richest. The right of the poorest 
to the opportunity of the fullest development is as inalienable as the right of 
the richest. Good government and the happiness of mankind are as dependent 
upon the development of the fullest powers of the poorest as upon the develop- 
ment of the fullest powers of the richest. Where the Creator has hidden the 
greatest powers no man can know till all have been given the fullest oppor- 
tunity to develop all that is in them. Every taxpayer, rich or poor, has an 



Work to Bk Done and How to Do It. 25 

equal right to have an equal chauce for the fullest development of his children 
in a public school with the fullest course of instruction that the State in the 
discharge of its governmental function is able to provide. 

"Public high schools constitute a part of every modern progressive system of 
public education. If our system of public schools is to take rank with the mod- 
ern, progressive systems of other States and other lands, to meet the modern 
demands for eilucation and supply to rich and poor alike equal educational 
opportunity, instruction in these higher branches, whereby preparation for col- 
lege or for life may be placed within the easy reach of all, must find a fixed 
and definite place in the system." 

Under the act of the General Assembly appropriating $50,000 from the State 
Treasury to aid in the establishment of public high schools, 175 public high 
schools in 87 counties of the State have been established, and applications for 
the establishment of many others have had to be refused each year on account 
of the insufficiency of the appropriation. A full report of these schools by 
Prof. N. W. Walker, State Inspector of Public High Schools, is published 
elsewhere in this Report. I commend it to your careful attention. 

Under the law and the rules adopted by the State Board of Education, which 
are printed elsewhere in this Report, not more than four of these schools can 
be established in any one county. No public high school can be established 
except in connection with a public school having at least two other teachers in 
the elementary and intermediate grades, and the entire time of at least one 
teacher must be devoted to the high-school grades. No public high school can 
be established in a town of more than twelve hundred inhabitants. 

Each district in which a public high school is established is required to dupli- 
cate by special taxation or subscription the amount apportioned to the school 
from the State appropriation ; and each county, unless the county school fund 
thereof is insufficient to provide a four-months school without aid from the 
second .$100,000, is required to apportion to each public high school out of the 
county fund an amount equal to that apportioned to it out of the State appro- 
priation. The minimum sum that can be apportioned annually from the State 
appropriation for the establishment and maintenance of any public high school 
is $250 and the maximum sum $500. The total sum annually available for any 
public high school established under this act ranges, therefore, from $500 to 
$1,500. The high-school funds can be used only for the payment of salaries of 
the high-school teachers and the necessary incidental expenses of the high- 
school grades. 

No teacher can be employed to teach or can draw salary for teaching any 
subjects in any public high school who does not hold a high-school teacher's 
certificate covering at least all subjects taught by said teacher in said public 
high school, issued by the State Board of Examiners, of which the State Super- 
intendent is ex officio chairman. The course of study is prescribed by the State 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

As indicative of the need and demand for these schools I beg to call j'our 
attention to the fact that there have been applications for many more such 
schools than could be established with the appropriation, and that the number 
of such applications would have been greatly increased had it not been under- 
stood that the appropriation was already exhausted. As a further striking in- 
dication of the need for them, of the desire among the masses of the country 
people for higher instruction, and of their willingness and determination to 



26 Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 

avail themselves of the opportunities placed within their reach for such instruc- 
tion, I beg to call your attention to these significant facts, taken from the 
official reports of these schools, all of ^Yhic•h are in country districts or small 
towns of less than twelve hundred people : 5,775 country boys and girls were 
enrolled in the high-school grades of these schools during the third year, and 
of these 4.145 were in average daily attendance; 3,541 were enrolled in the 
eighth grade, or the first year's work of the high school ; 1,634 in the ninth 
grade, or the second year's work of the high school ; 536 in the tenth grade, or 
the third year's work of the high school ; 64 in the eleventh gi'ade, or the 
fourth year's work of the high school. 

Do not the large enrollment and the remarkable average daily attendance of 
more than 71 per cent of the enrollment in these high schools indicate almost a 
pathetic eagerness of the country boys and girls for high-school instruction, 
and a commendable willingness on the part of their parents to make the sacri- 
fices necessary to give their children a chance to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunities to get it? Is it not more than probable that perhaps nine-tenths of 
all these boys and girls enrolled in all the grades of these high schools would 
never have had an opportunity for any higher instruction or better prepara- 
tion through higher instruction for service and citizenship had not these public 
high schools been established within their reach and means? 

The State and county cannot afford to ignore this demand and need. An 
adequate system of public high schools will be found to be a part of every 
modern system of public education in all progressive cities and States in this 
country and in all the most progressive and prosperous countries of the world. 
It is a need and demand of the age. By no other means than by the public 
high school can high-school instruction be placed within the reach of the chil- 
dren of the many. By no other means than by the rural public high school 
can it be placed within the reach of the great majority of the country boj's 
and girls. 

The private high school cannot meet this demand, because the tuition and 
other necessary charges for its maintenance place it beyond the means of the 
majority of the counti'y boys and girls, and because the number of country 
parents who are able to bear these necessary expenses of instruction in private 
high schools for their children is far too small to maintain enough of these 
private high schools to be within reasonable reach of more than a very small 
minority of the country boys and girls. No one church is able to support 
enough of these high schools to place high-school instruction within reasonable 
reach or within the financial ability of more than a mere handful of boys and 
girls in the rural districts. 

The church high school could hardly hope for the patronage of more than the 
children of the families accepting its tenets or inclined to its doctrines. For a 
complete system of high schools, therefore, that would reach all the children, 
it would seem to be necessary for each denomination to maintain a system of 
high schools in every county and to have as many systems of high schools in 
each county as there are denominations in that county. The impracticability 
and expensiveness of meeting adequately the demand for high-school instruc- 
tion among the masses of the people, especially in the rural districts, by private 
high schools or by church high schools must be apparent, therefore, to any 
thoughtful student of rural conditions. 

The task of placing high-school instruction within reasonable reach of all the 



Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 27 

cbildreu of all the people, irrespective of creed or condition, is too great and 
too complicated, it seems to me, ever to be successfully performed by church, 
private enterprise or philanthropy. If performed at all, it seems to me, it 
must be by all the people supporting by uniform taxation a system of public 
high schools of sufficient number to be within the reasonable reach of all the 
children of every county and community, with doors wide open to the children 
of the poor and the children of the rich, irrespective of creed or condition, 
affording equality of educational opportunity to all the children of a reiniblic, 
of which equality of opportunity is a basic principle. 

The church high school and the jjrivate high school will still tind a place and 
an important work in our educational system, but they can never take the place 
or do the work of the public high school for the masses of the people. There 
will always be those among us who will prefer the church or private high 
school, and who will be able to indulge this preference, but the main depend- 
ence of the many for higher education must still be the public high school, sup- 
ported by the taxes of all the people, belonging to all the people, within reach 
of all the people. God speed the work of the church and the private high 
school in this common battle against ignorance and illiteracy. There is work 
enough for all to do; but surely, in a republic like ours, one of the cardinal 
principles of which is and must ever be the greatest good to the greatest num- 
ber, friends of the church high school and of the private high school will never 
undertake to say that all the people must get out of the way of a few of the 
people, and that the many public high schools, supported by all the people for 
the benefit of all the children, must get out of the way for a few private and 
church high schools that can at best hope to reach but a few of the children of 
the people. 

Future Development of Public High Schools. — There are now from one to 
four public high schools in each of 87 counties of the State. There are, there- 
fore, 11 counties in which no public high schools have yet been established. 
For the proper maintenance and development of these high schools more money 
will, of course, be required. I have elsewhere recommended an increase of 
$25,000 in the annual State appropriation for the maintenance of these 
schools. 

It is our hope to be able to select the best higlj school in each county, tak- 
ing into consideration the location, the accessibility, the environment, etc., 
and develop this into a real first-class county high school, doing thorough 
high-school work for four full years. Around this school should be built a 
dormitory and a teachers' home. A part of the State Loan Fund could be 
used to aid in building the dormitory and the teachers' home. The dormi- 
toi'y, properly conducted, would afford an opportunity for the boys and girls 
from all parts of the county to board at actual cost. Many of these could 
return to their homes Friday evening, coming back Monday morning. Manj^ 
of them who do not have the money to spare to pay their board would proba- 
bly be able to bring such provisions as are raised on the farm and have them 
credited on their board at the market price. The principal's home would 
make it possible to secure a better principal and keep him probably for years, 
thereby giving more permanency to the school and more continuity to the 
work, making a citizen of the teacher and enabling him and his family to be- 
come potent factors in the permanent life of the community, contributing no 
small part to uplifting it, morally and intellectually, by their influence. A 



28 Work to Be Done aistd How to Do It. 

small room rent could be charged each student, that would probably afford 
sufficient income to repay the annual installments on the loan for the dormi- 
tory. The balance of the cost of the dormitory, and in some instances all the 
cost of the dormitory, could probably be raised easily by private subscription 
in the community and county, if the raising of it should be made a condition 
precedent to the permanent location of such a county high school. 

It is my hope to be able to secure the development of a number of these 
county high schools in the most favorable covmties, equipped with dormito- 
ries and teachers' homes, and demonstrate the practicability, the success and 
the value of them. Having done this, it will be easy to secure their establish- 
ment and development in other counties. The increased State appropriation 
which I have recommended and hope to secm'e this year should, in my opin- 
ion, be used for the development of these central county high schools, so that 
we can gradually develop in every county of the State at least one first-class 
coimty high school with dormitory and teachers' home. Then the other high 
schools in different sections of the county should be correlated with this cen- 
tral school, and the course of study in these should be limited probably to 
not more than two years of high-school work, requiring all students desiring 
to pursue the last two years of the four-years course to attend the central 
county high school, which will be fully equipped in all respects for thorough 
high-school work. 

These central county high schools, as they grow and develop, should become 
also the nuclei for successful industrial and agricultural training. Parallel 
courses of study for the last two years might be arranged, one course offering 
thoi'ough preparation for college to the small nmnber of students desiring such 
preparation, and the other offering practical industrial and agricultural train- 
ing for the large number whose education will end with the high school. The 
dormitoiy would afford a splendid equipment for practice work for the girls 
in cooking, domestic science, household economics, etc. ; while the boys, during 
the last two years, could have training in agricultural subjects that will fit 
them for more intelligent and profitable farming. The practical side of this 
work coiild be supplied by acquiring by purchase or lease a small farm in 
connection with the high school. The development of this sort of a central 
county high school in each comity will be in accord with the plan for the 
establishment and maintenance of county farm-life high schools, recommended 
and explained elsewhere in this Report, and they will form the nuclei for 
such schools in every county. 

All this /development must, of course, be a gradual and perhaps a somewhat 
slow growth. It is best that it should be. We must be content with the day 
of small things. We cannot far outrun the desire, demand and ability of the 
people. Our schools must have their roots in the life and needs of the people 
and gi'ow out of these. They must not be lifted at once so high above these 
that their roots cannot touch them and that the people will be unable to reach 
up to them. They must connect with the life and conditions as they now are, 
and grow upward slowly, changing these gradually and lifting them upward 
with them as they grow. 

Industrial and Agricultural Education. — "Every complete educational system 
must make provision also for that training in the school which will give fitness 
for the more skillful performance of the multitudinous tasks of the practical 
work of the world, the pursuit of which is the inevitable lot of the many, for 



Work to Be Done and Hoav to Do It. 29 

that training wliich will connect the life and instruction of the school more 
closely with the life that they must lead, which will better prepare them for 
usefulness and happiness in the varied spheres in which they must move. All 
these spheres are necessary to the well-being of a complex life like ours. The 
Creator, who has. ordained all spheres of useful action, has not endowed all with 
the same faculties or fitted all for the same sphere of action. 

" 'We are all Mit parts of one stupendous whole, 
Whose Tjody Nature is, and God the soul!' 

"Every wise system of education, therefore, must, beyond a certain point of 
educational development, recognize natural differences of endowment and fol- 
low to some extent the lines of natural adaptation and tastes, thus cooperating 
with Nature and God. The education that turns a life into unnatural channels 
and into the pursuit of the unattainable fills that life with discontent and dooms 
it to inevitable failure and tragedy. In recognition of these established 
laws of Nature and life, manual training and industrial education are begin- 
ning to find a fixed and permanent place in systems of modern education. 
They have already been given a place in some of the higher institutions of 
our public-school system — in the A. and M. College for the white race at 
Raleigh, in the State Normal and Industrial College for Women at Greensboro, 
and in the A. and M. College for the Colored Race at Greensboro. Under the 
new supervision industrial training will be emphasized in the State Colored 
Normal Schools at Winston, Fayetteville, and Elizabeth City. Some of the city 
graded schools, notably those of Durham, Asheville, Wilmington, Winston, 
Greensboro, and Charlotte, have introduced manual training and industrial 
education. 

"This sort of education, however, must come as a growth, a development of 
a general school system that provides first for the intellectual mastery of 
those branches that are recognized as essential for intelligent citizenship and 
workmanship everywhere. It must be remembered that the first essential 
difference between skilled labor and imskilled labor is a difference of intelli- 
gence as well as of special training ; that a skilled farmer must be first of all 
a thinking man on the farm; a skilled mechanic, a thinking man in the shop; 
that a skilled hand is but a hand with brains put into it and finding expres- 
sion through it ; that without brains put into it a man's hand is no more than 
a monkey's paw ; that without brains applied to it a man's labor is on the 
same dead level with the labor of the dull horse and the plodding ox ; that a 
man with a trained, hand and nothing more is a mere machine, a mere hand. 
The end of education is first to make a man, not a machine. 

"It will be well to remember, also, that industrial education is the most ex- 
pensive sort of education, on accoimt of the equipment necessary for it, and 
the character of the teachers required for it. Teachers prepared for success- 
ful instruction in this sort of education must, of course, be in some sense 
specialists in their line, and always command good salaries. For the major- 
ity of the public schools of the State, therefore, with one-room schoolhouses 
without special equipment and with one teacher without special training, on 
an average salary of $.34.47 per month, with barely money enough for a four- 
months term and for instruction in the common-school branches, with more 
daily recitations already than can be successfully conducted, industrial edu- 
cation and technical training are at present impracticable. 



30 Work to Be Done and Hoav to Do It. 

"A study of the history of this sort of education will show that it has come 
as' a later development, after ample provision had been made for thorough 
instruction in the lower and in the higher branches of study, in those schools 
that were provided with school funds sufficient for instruction in the ordi- 
nary school studies, for the expensive equipment and for the teachers trained 
especially for industrial and technical edtication. In fact, I think it will be 
found that such education has been provided first in the towns and cities and 
great centers of wealth and population or in institutions generously supported 
by large State appropriations or by large endowments. To undertake such 
education in the ordinaiy rural schools of the State in their present condition, 
with their present equipment and with the meager funds available for them, 
would result in burlesque and failure, and would, in my opinion, set back for 
a generation or two this important work. 

"We might, however, begin to develop our public-school system in that direc- 
tion in those communities and counties where the conditions are favorable and 
the funds sufficient, and we might begin to devise ways and means for pro- 
viding the necessary funds and making the conditions favorable in other com- 
munities. I trust that means may soon be found for the establishment in 
every comity of at least one or more schools for industrial and agricultural 
training. This will require more money, however, than is now available for 
public schools, and will probably require both county and State appropria- 
tions. In the meantime it is proper and wise to cultivate public sentiment 
for this sort of education, and to provide for it as rapidly as we shall find 
ways and means for doing so. In the meantime, also, we can continue to 
give in all our public schools elementaiy instruction in agriculture and to 
encourage nature study in the schools. An admirable little text-book on agri- 
cultiu'e has been adopted for use in public schools, and in the course of study 
sent out simple nature study has been provided in every grade." 

Farm-life Schools. — More than eight-tenths of our population, according to 
the last census, still live on the farms. I hope the day will never come in the 
history of the South when a majority of our people will cease to live in the 
country. In great crises in the history of every nation the hope, the strength, 
the salvation have generally been found in its country people. Its qmetude and 
peace, affording opportunity for meditation and reflection, for daily communion 
with God's great teacher, Nature, giving time for great thoughts and divine 
emotions to take deep and everlasting root in human hearts and human 
character, its freedom from mad excitement, from artificiality, from the mani- 
fold temptations of gilded vice, from the effeminating influences of luxury and 
excessive wealth, make the country the ideal place for the development of the 
strongest type of men and women, and help, I think, to explain the historical 
fact that the country always has been the greatest nursery of great men and 
women. The old myth of Antfeus. representing the earth giant as unconquer- 
able so long as the contact between him and his mother earth was not broken, 
was not all a myth. There was a great truth at the bottom of it, which we in 
modern times would do well to heed. 

We cannot hope, however, for the more ambitious and aspiring of our country 
people to continue to live in the country unless their children can be given an 
equal chance for culture and training in the country schools, and unless they 
can be taught to make farming more profitable and farm life more attractive 
by bringing into it such modern conveniences of life as increased prosperity 



Work to Be Done and How to Do It, 31 

aloue can command, and enriching it with the higher intellectual and social 
pleasures that sweeten, soften, refine and adorn life, impossible withuut intelli- 
gence and iutelleetual culture. If we would keep the best of the country people 
in the eoimtry we must find a way to bring the best of modern civilization into 
the country without forcing the country people to leave the country to get it. 
We must find a way to shape our education for country boys and girls more 
toward fitting them for making life on the farm at least as profitable, as pleas- 
ant, as attractive, and as livable as life iinywhere else. 

Of course, the first aim of all education is to make a man and an intelligent" 
citizen. The successful farmer must first of all be a thinking man, able to 
apply his intelligence and training to his business, to mix his brains with his 
soil. Our rural schools, therefore, must first of all provide instruction in such 
elementary and secondary subjects as the experience of the ages has declared 
essential and best for intellectual and moral mastery. Beyond the point of the. 
acquisition of these essentials, however, I believe it safe and wise to shape the 
course of study for the country boys and girls more in the direction of special 
preparation for farm life. 

With our limited means we have been so busy striving to provide sufficient 
elementary and secondary schools to place the essentials of education in reach 
of all that we have had neither the time nor the money to give serious atten- 
tion to the other problem. I believe, however, that it is time now for us to 
face this problem and begin to seek to solve it successfully. Our Agricultural 
and Mechanical College and our State Department of Agriculture should be our 
chief helpers in working out this problem. I have ventured to make some sug- 
gestions about this elsewhere in this Report in discussing the future develop- 
ment of the public high schools. We should study carefully, also, what has 
been done by others, and profit by their successful experience. 

From the information that I have been able to get, it seems to me that Wis- 
consin has been more successful than any other State in dealing with this 
problem of providing practical schools at moderate expense for training coun- 
try boys and girls for country life. Years ago they began with one such school 
in a small way, with plain and inexpensive buildings and equipment, conducted 
at an annual expense of onlj- a few thousand dollars. Fortunately, this school 
was under the direction of practical, trained teachers instead of faddish spe- 
cialists. It took hold of life and conditions in the country as they existed, 
busied itself with the practical, everyday problems and tasks of farm life and 
work and with finding practical and more profitable ways of doing those. It 
had to win its way slowly. The farmers of the county in which it was located 
had to be convinced of its value a:id necessity by results obtained, by the prac- 
tical benefits they observed and derived from its work. By keeping in close 
touch with them and gathering as many of them as possible about the school 
once or twice a year, they were made to feel that it was their school in deed 
and in truth, and their hearty cooperation was at last secured. The school 
was kept in close touch with the Agricultural and Mechanical College of the 
University of Wisconsin and under the general direction of the members of its 
faculty. 

As the farmers of the county in which it was located saw and felt the uplift- 
ing and transforming power of its work in their homes and on their farms, 
they I'allied enthusiastically to its support, and it became their pride. Farmers 
of other counties began to take notice of its successful work, and some of the 



32 Work to Be Done and Hoav to Do It. 

more intelligent of tliem began to demand a similar school and to work for it. 
There are now, I believe, seven of these schools in different sections of the State 
of Wisconsin, all closely correlated with the Agricultural and Mechanical Col- 
lege. They form the most effective rheans for disseminating among the masses 
of the people a knowledge of farming and farm life, that I am reliably informed 
has been worth already millions of dollars in increased products of the farms 
and in the increased value of those products on account of their improved 
quality. What they have been worth in the transformation of the life in the 
farm homes, through the knowledge and training given to hundreds of country 
girls in these schools, cannot be measured in paltry dollars. 

I believe that the time is ripe for the establishment of county farm-life 
schools in this State — that we have reached, in fact, that point in our educa- 
tional development where the establishment of such schools is a necessity. In 
the future we must have in our sj'stem real rural schools and not mere city 
schools in the country — schools the training in which will grow more out of 
rural life, tend more toward rural life and fit better for rural life. 

I have recommended elsewhere in this Report an annual State appropriation 
of $50,000 to aid in the establishment and maintenance of county farm-life 
high schools, in conjunction with the best and most conveniently located of the 
existing county high schools, as a part of the regular county public school 
system. 

Beyond the point of providing the common, univei'sal essentials of intelligence 
and good citizenship, the education of the many in every community should be 
turned mainly in the direction of increased eflSiciency in the sphere of human 
activity to which they are best adapted by nature and environment, and in 
which they are most needed and will, in all probability, be most useful and suc- 
cessful, and, therefore, most contented and happy. The point in the develop- 
ment of the public school system of North Carolina has been about reached 
where a course of study providing instruction in the common, universal essen- 
tials of human intelligence, reading, writing and arithmetic, which must form 
the foundation of all education, and in other elementary subjects essential to 
good citizenship and right living in a republic, has been placed within reason- 
able reach of all. The next step, therefore, in the development of the public 
school system must be adequate provision for the preparation of the many in 
each community to make the most of what is about them for the most efficient, 
most useful, and happiest life in their environment. 

Eighty-two per cent of the people of North Carolina still dwell in the country 
and engage in agricultural pursuits. The safety, prosperity, and progress of 
the State, the preservation of the best in its civilization, according to the evi- 
dence of all human history, depend upon the preservation of a large, prosper- 
ous, intelligent, contented country population. The keeping of a large per- 
centage of our people in the country, on the farms, must of necessity, be predi- 
cated upon their preparation, through the right sort of education, for making 
farm life more profitable, thereby providing the means for bringing into 
country life the comforts, conveniences, and higher pleasures of modern civili- 
zation that will make it more livable and more attractive — as profitable and 
attractive as city life or life anywhere. It is natural and right that men 
should live where they can make most of themselves and get most out of life 
for themselves and others. Good roads, good houses, good churches, good 
schools, good clothes, good food, good vehicles, all the necessities, comforts. 



Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 33 

and conveniences of modern civilization that contribute to malce iir(> more 
livable and attractive, cost money in the country as well as in the tt)\vn, and 
can be supplied to keep country people in the country contented and happy 
only by providing, through their schools, for their children the sort of educa- 
tion and training that will enable them to make farming sufficiently profitable 
to provide the money necessary to secure these things. 

Ninety-five per cent of the country children must get their preparation for 
making country life more profitable, more pleasant, more beautiful, in the 
coimti-y schools in their own school districts and counties. These country 
schools, therefore, in order to minister to the needs of the many in the 
country communities, must be adapted to the needs of comitry life and 
country people, must be schools for country children, dealing more largely 
with countiy things and country life and teaching how to make the most out 
of these, instead of town schools transplanted to the country, dealing largely 
with town things and town life, and turning country children toward the 
town and the city by interesting them more in urban things than in rural 
things, and preparing them more for urban life than for rural life. 

Demand from Teachers and Farmers for Such Instruction and Such 
Schools. — The demand for such instruction and for such schools has come from 
the teachers as represented in their various organizations and from the 
farmers as represented in their various organizations. For eight years the 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, in his Biennial Report, has empha- 
sized the need of industrial and agricultural education and the establishment 
of such schools. Two years ago, in his Biennial Report, a chapter was de- 
voted specifically to the discussion and advocacy of the county farm-life high 
schools, and notice was served at that time that an appropriation for the 
establishment and maintenance of such schools would be recommended and 
pressed upon the General Assembly of 1911. 

At the annual meetings of the State Association of Ct)unty Superintendents 
at Hendersonville in September, 1909, and at Chapel Hill in September, 1910, 
the discussion of farm-life schools occupied an important place in the pro- 
grams, and strong resolutions were unanimously passed, favoring the estab- 
lishment of such schools and an appropriation therefor. The North Carolina 
Teachers' Assembly, at its annual meeting in Asheville. in June, 1910, also 
imanimously passed resolutions favoring the e.-^tablishnient of such schools 
and the appropriation therefor. The State Farmers' Union, at its annual 
meeting at the A. and M. College, in Raleigh, in August, 1910, adopted en- 
thusiastically and unanimously, after full and able discussion, the report of 
the educational committee, strongly favoring the establishment of farm-life 
schools as an organic part of the public school system and an appropriation 
therefor. The Farmers' Union, through its official paper and its local imions, 
has been carrjing on an active and enthusiastic campaign for the proposition 
ever since. 

It would seem, therefore, that the teachers and the farmers, the two classes 
most vitally interested, whose views upon a proposition of this sort should 
receive first consideration, are in hearty accord and cooperation about the 
general proposition for agricultural instruction and the establishment of 
coimty farm-life high schools, in connection with and as a part of the pres- 
ent county high-school system. Committees on legislation have been ap- 

Part 1—3 



34 Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 

pointed by these representative bodies of teachers and farmers to confer in 
worlcing out the details of a practical plan for the establishment and main- 
tenance of such schools and to cooperate in securing the enactment of the 
plan into law and in obtaining an annual State appropriation for its successful 
execution. 

I submit below the outline of a carefully considered plan for the establish- 
ment and maintenance of such schools, based upon a study and observation 
of similar schools in the Middle West and a knowledge of existing needs and 
conditions in North Carolina : 

FARM-LIFE SCHOOLS. 

Additional State Appropriation for County Farm-life Schools. — The State is 
now appropriating $50,000 annually to aid in the establishment and main- 
tenance of high schools in the counties. One hundred and seventy-six of these 
schools have already been established in eighty-seven counties, ranging in 
number from one to four to the county, receiving annually for maintenance 
from $250 to $500 each from the State, and an equal amount from the high- 
school district and the county respectively. On account of the limited funds, 
these high schools must of necessity be devoted mainly to higher instruction 
in literary subjects and better preparation for the ordinary duties of citizen- 
ship, which is important and necessary ; but they have not sufficient funds to 
provide also the teachers and equipment needed for efficient and extended 
special instruction in agriculture and home-making on the farm. 

Equipment and Maintenance. — It is proposed to ask for an additional 
appropriation of $.50,000 or $100,000, to be used for the establishment of a 
comity farm-life high school in conjunction with the best and most conveniently 
located of these literary high schools in those counties complying with the con- 
ditions to be prescribed in the law for the adequate eqmpment and maintenance 
of the school. The equipment of such a school will necessarily include a farm 
large enough for demonstration purposes and practical work and instruction in 
all agricultural pursuits, a baru for practice and instruction in dairying, a dor- 
mitory for the accommodation, at actual cost of living, of the boys and girls 
from parts of the county too remote for them to walk or ride to the school, 
a corps of competent, efficient teachers, some of whom must, of course, be 
especially trained in subjects pertaining to agriculture, housekeeping and 
home-making. The equipment should be modest and comparatively inexpen- 
sive, such as would be within reasonable reach of any fairly intelligent, indus- 
trious, prosperous farmer in that county. The course of study should minister 
to the needs of the two classes of students, the smaller number desiring 
preparation for college and the larger number that will, in all likelihood, 
complete at this school their preparation for life on the farm. The parents 
of both classes of students pay taxes for the maintenance of the school and 
are of right entitled to have provision made for their children. Instruction 
will be the same for both classes in most of the common literary subjects, 
and in these subjects can be given by the same teachers. The holding of the 
two classes of students together, carrying on their work in the same school, 
and in many subjects in the same classes, side by side, will be more econom- 
ical, more just, more democratic, will tend to inspire in each a greater respect 
for and sympathy with the other, and will help to overcome harmful social 
cleavage along vocational lines and to eliminate false distinctions of honor 



Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 35 

and social standing between industrial workers and professional workers. 
For the preservation of tlie homogeneity of our people and the integrity of 
our democracy, the vocational and the cultural, the literary and the agricul- 
tural and the industrial, must be held together in our system of schools. In 
a democracy like ours peasant schools or separate schools for separate classes 
should find no place. 

Cost of Equipment and Maintenance. — Last fall the writer availed himself of 
an opportunity to visit and investigate a number of successful agricultural 
high schools in Wisconsin and the Middle West, with a view to informing 
himself upon this subject preparatory to the establishment of farm-life 
schools in North Carolina, because he has been interested in them and has 
foreseen for years that they were a necessity which the people of North Caro- 
lina would wisely provide for the education of their children in the near 
future. 

According to the best information that he could obtain, from $4,000 to 
$6,000 annually will be required to maintain and successfully operate a 
county farm:life school, and the equipment therefor will cost from $10,000 to 
$25,000. It would, of course, be unfortunate to undertake these schools with- 
out adequate funds and equipment for their successful operation, for their 
failure would retard educational progress along these lines, discourage the 
people, and prevent for years any further growth or development of this 
important movement. 

The farm-life part of the school, for the instruction of the boys and girls in 
agricultural and home-making subjects, will, of course, prove a failure and a 
farce, unless the right sort of teachers, with the right sort of scientific and 
special training, practical experience and common sense, can be secured to 
direct it. Such teachers are difficult to find at present, and command good 
salaries when found. The demand for them is already greater than the 
supply. 

How to Provide Equipment and Funds for Maintenance. — How shall the 
equipment and the funds for annual maintenance be provided? My observa- 
tion and experience have led me to the conclusion that people appreciate more, 
are bound more closely to and support more heartily schools that they have 
helped to pay for and make some financial sacrifice to get. In a government 
like ours, the responsibility and obligation for the education of the children 
is threefold, as are the benefits derived therefrom. The State owes an obliga- 
tion to the child, as the child and future citizen of the State ; the county owes 
an obligation to the child, as the child and future citizen of the county ; the 
community owes an obligation to the child, as the child and future citizen of 
the community ; and each will presvimably derive a correlative benefit from the 
development, through education, of the power in the child, and of his efficiency 
as a worker and a citizen. Our entire public school system is based upon this 
democratic idea of the threefold division of the responsibility and the burden 
and the threefold sharing of the benefits. ^ 

This farm-life school should become an organic part of the State and county 
system of schools, and should be equipped and maintained in accordance with 
the same general plan for the equipment and maintenance of the other parts 
of the system. The State should provide part, the county and the community 
part, thereby tying all three closely in interest and responsibility to the 
school. 



36 WoKK TO Be Done and How to Do It. 

It is proposed, therefore, that out of the special State appropriation of 
$50,000, $2,500 should be anuually apportioned for the maintenance of the 
county farm-life school in those counties that will provide, by special tax, at 
least an equal amount for maintenance annually, and that will provide further, 
before the State apportionment for maintenance shall be available, adequate 
equipment in buildings, farm, etc., the equipment to be provided by the county 
and the community securing the location of the school by bond issue or by 
private subscriptions and donations, or by both. This would provide for the 
equipment, and for an annual maintenance fund of at least $5,000. The 
county could, of course, increase the equipment and maintenance fund accord- 
ing to the needs of the school as it gi'ew and developed. 

Of course, an annual State appropriation of $50,000 would provide for the 
establishment and maintenance of only twenty county farm-life schools. An 
annual appropriation of $100,000 would provide for twice the number. These 
schools should, of course, be established first in counties where the environ- 
ment and agricultural conditions and public sentiment are favorable for their 
success. 

On account of the conditions prescribed for the county and community, of 
the difficulty of getting a sufficient number of the right sort of teachers for 
them, and of the special and careful attention and supervision that should 
be given these schools, especially for the first several years, I do not think 
that it would be wise, even if we had sufficient funds, to undertake the estab- 
lishment and operation of more than fifteen or twenty of such schools the 
first two years. If possible, some of the first established schools should be 
located in each section of the State, so as to deal with the different agricul- 
tural and soil conditions in each section. As these schools, under careful 
supervision, direction, and economical administration, by the results obtained 
demonstrated their value and practicability, the demand for them in other 
counties would increase with the passing years, until finally the entire State 
would be covered. 

It is exceedingly important that we should start no more at first than we 
can reasonably hope to make eminently successful. The success of every new 
movement depends largely upon the success of the first experiment. In the 
meantime, provision could be made in the law for sharing on reasonable 
terms the benefits of these farm-life schools with the country boys and girls in 
adjoining and other arcessible counties. 

Benefit of Such Schools. — What are some of the benefits that may reason- 
ably be expected from an adequately equipped and successfully operated 
comity farm-life school? Such a school should become an intellectual, agricul- 
tural, and industrial dynamo for the entire county. Its farm-life work should 
be twofold : the instruction and training of scores of country boys and girls 
annually in the best methods of farming, dairying, orcharding, stock fudging, 
and stock raising, handling and marketing crops, cooking, sewing, and other 
things pertaining to housekeeping and home-making. Such training and prac- 
tical instruction would send them back to the farm prepared to make farming 
more profitable, farm life more livable, farm-houses more comfortable and 
more beautiful. These, in their various communities, would become sources of 
inspiration and disseminators of agricultural information and demonstration 
for their neighbors, in this way aiding greatly in the improvement of the agri- 
cultural conditions of the entire county, and increasing the wealth, the tax- 



Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 37 

able values of all its property, and the general prosperity and progress. In 
a word, the boys so trained would become, in their oonnuunities, eloquent 
apostles and living examples of better and more profitable farming, and the 
girls so trained would become, in their homes, epistles known and read of all 
in the sweetest and finest of all arts, the art of making a comfortable and 
beautiful home, in the best environment in the world for such a home — the 
very heart of nature. 

Extension and Demonstration Work. — Such a school, in the second place, 
could and would, through its faculty, carry on most valuable extension and 
demonstration work among the farmers and their wives in all parts of the 
county, meeting with them from time to time in their communities for instruc- 
tion and demonstration in all things pertaining to their farm life and work, in 
this way carrying to them the new truth and the new light, and pointing 
them to the better way. From time to time, these farmers and their wives 
could and would be gathered about the school for instruction, for inspiration, 
for socializing, for organization and cooperation. 

In this and other ways, such a school would indeed prove a continual 
dynamo of agricultural interest and farm-life instruction and inspiration. 
Through it the larger agencies of the A. and M. College, the State Department 
of Agriculture, and the National Department of Agriculture could operate 
more effectively and successfully, and the interest aroused by these larger 
agencies could be husbanded, applied, and permanently continued. The work 
of the school could be correlated with the college, and many a boy and girl 
would be inspired by the taste of better things to drink more deeply at the 
larger fountain ever flowing in copious streams in their colleges and to pre- 
pare themselves for splendid leadership. 

Such a school would become a county training school for the rank and file of 
the rural school teachers, in agricultural as well as literary subjects. The 
head of the agricultural department of such a school could be made the super- 
visor of agricultural instruction in all the public schools of the county, and 
in cooperation with the County Superintendent, through instruction of the 
county teachers in the meetings of their county teachers' association, and 
through visitation of the schools with the County Superintendent .from time 
to time, could aid in creating a farm-life atmosphere in the rural schools and 
in bringing into them such simple elementary instruction in agriculture as 
could be made practical and effective through intelligent and interested 
teachers under intelligent instruction. It would be altogether possible and 
practical for successful work in agriculture, cooking, sewing, and other house- 
keeping subjects to be carried on under supervision of the teachers in the 
county farm-life school on a smaller scale in other high schools of the county, 
and perhaps in a number of the other public schools, especially in the local-tax 
schools with two or more teachers. 

Leavening the Whole Lump. — The whole lump would finally be leavened. 
Intelligence would demand and more money would command for country life, 
good roads, good schools, good churches, good vehicles, and the thousands of 
comforts and conveniences that break up the isolation of country life and 
bring into it all the best of city life without its worst. Thus, indeed, by train- 
ing the children to find and make the most of the countless treasures God has 
hidden in soil and stream, in rock and tree, in plant and air and cloud, may 
the country life be transformed into the ideal life, and country men and women 



38 Work to Be Done axd How to Do It. 

enter into the rich iuheritance prepared from the beginning for them — a 
healthful life of freedom, fullness, sweetness, peace, and beauty. Then will 
men desire it more, seek it more, and live it more contentedly and happily. 

Some will say that I have overdrawn the picture. Not so. I have but inad- 
equately portrayed what I have already seen the beginning of in other favored 
portions of our own land. Only through the portals of such a school as we 
have endeavored to describe can our country boys and girls enter into and pos- 
sess this promised land lying all about them. Shall we provide it, or shall we 
not? The cost of the schools will be as nothing compared with the richness 
in money and in life that they will bring through the passing years. If we 
can but start them now and set them at their everlasting work, the battle will 
be won, for the people, seeing and enjoying their beneficent work, will be more 
able and more willing to give for their maintenance and enlargement as the 
years go by. 

Illiteracy and Nonattendance and How to Overcome Them — Compulsory 
Attendance.- — With 175,325 native white illiterates over ten years of age, or 
19.G per cent, according to the United States Census of 1900; with 54,208, or 
19 per cent, native white illiterates of voting age; with 45,632 native white 
illiterates between ten and nineteen years of age ; with only 69.5 per cent of 
the white children between the ages of six and twenty-one enrolled in the 
public schools and only 43 per cent of them in regular daily attendance; with 
about 137,340 white children between these ages unenrolled in the public 
schools ; with North Carolina still standing in the United States Census of 1900 
next to the last in the column of white illiteracy, the urgent need of finding and 
enforcing some means of changing as rapidly as possible these appalling con- 
ditions must be apparent to every thoughtful, patriotic son of the State.* Two 
means suggest themselves: (1) Attraction and persuasion. (2) Compulsory 
attendance. 

Attraction and Persuasion. — "Much has been done, much more can be done, 
to increase attendance through the attractive power of better houses and 
grounds, better teachers, and longer terms. An attractive schoolhouse and a 
good teacher in every district, making a school commanding by its work public 
confidence, respect and pride, would do much to overcome nonattendance. 
The attractive power of improved schools and equipment to increase attend- 
ance is clearly demonstrated by the statistics of this Report, which show, with 
few exceptions, the largest per cent of attendance in consolidated districts, 
rural special-tax districts and entire counties that have the largest school 
fund, the longest school terms, and the best schools. 

"The general rule seems to be, then, that attendance is in direct proportion 
to the efficiency .of the schools and the school system. I have already called 
your attention to the fact that with the improvement in the public schoolhouse 
and schools, and the increased educational interest during the past few years, 
has come also an increase in the per cent of enrollment and attendance in the 
public schools. 

"Much can also be done to increase the attendance upon the public schools 
by earnest teachers, who will go, into the homes of indifferent or selfish parents 
whose children are not in school, and by persuasive argument and tact and 
appeals to parental pride induce many of these parents to send their children ; 



♦These figures have, of course, been materially decreased since the United States Census 
of 1900, but the figures for the census of 1910 are not available for this Report. 



Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 39 

who will seek out children iu homes of poverty, and remove, through quiet, 
blessed charity, the causes of their detention from school. From the census 
and from the report of the preceding teacher recorded in the school register 
each teacher can ascertain at the beginning of the session the names of all 
illiterates and nonattendants of school age in the district and the reported 
causes of nonattendance. Under the rules recommended by the State Super- 
intendent and adopted by many comity boards of education the teacher is 
required to spend two days immediately preceding the opening of the school in 
visiting the parents and making special efforts to get these children to attend 
school. I have no doubt that many of these can be and will be reached by 
these efforts. Much can be done, also, by active, efficient school committeemen 
and other school officers, who will take an interest in the school and aid the 
teachers in finding and bringing in the children. 

"The compelling power of public opinion will do much to bring children into 
the school. Logically, as public sentiment for education increases, public senti- 
ment against nonattendance will increase. Public opinion might, in many 
communities, be brought to the point of rendering it almost disgraceful for 
parents to keep children at home without excellent excuse during the session 
of the schools. Self-respecting parents would be loath to defy such a public 
opinion and run the risk of forfeiting the esteem of the best people of the 
community. 

"It is the tragic truth, however, that there are some parents so blinded by 
ignorance to the value and importance of education, and others so lazy, 
thriftless or selfish that they cannot be reached by the power of attraction and 
persuasion, or the mild compulsion of public opinion." It is the sad truth 
that those whose children most need the benefits offered by the public schools 
are hardly to be reached by any other means but compulsion. 

No stronger or more conclusive evidence of the impossibility of overcoming 
illiteracy and nonattendance by the mild means of attraction, persuasion and 
public opinion can be found than the fact, revealed by this Report, that the 
percentage of enrollment and attendance is larger in the rural districts than 
in the towns and cities with their superior attractions of better houses, longer 
terms, more teachers, trained superintendents, shorter distance to travel, paved 
streets, etc. 

Compulsory Attendance. — Knowing the conservatism and the independence 
of our people and their natural resentment of the suggestion of compulsion 
in anything, I have been slow in reaching the conclusion that a compulsory 
attendance law was necessary and wise for North Carolina. A careful investi- 
gation of the existing conditions in North Carolina and of the means by which 
similar conditions have been effectively remedied in other States and other 
countries has forced me to the conclusion that nonattendance, irregularity of 
attendance and the resulting illiteracy will never be overcome except by 
reasonable, conservative compulsory laws. For eight years and more we have 
been building new, attractive, comfortable schoolhouses at the average rate 
of more than one a day for every day in the year ; we have been improving 
the equipment and increasing in every way the attractiveness of the houses 
and grounds ; we have been carrying on a vigorous campaign with considerable 
success through a friendly press, through public addresses, through the wide- 
spread circulation of literature for the cultivation of public sentiment and for 
the increase of interest and enthusiasm for education ; we have been increasing 



40 Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 

expenditures for all educational purposes ; we have been systematizing and 
improving the course of study ; we have been increasing the compensation, the 
efficiency and the qualifications of county superintendents and teachers; we 
have been lengthening the school term ; county superintendents, teachers and 
school officers have been increasing their efforts to increase the attendance, and 
still thousands of white and colored children have remained out of the schools 
and are now on the straight road to illiteracy. In spite of all these efforts of 
attraction and persuasion, the per cent of enrollment during the seven years, 
and the per cent of average daily attendance, have been increased but little. 

The tendency of illiteracy is to perpetuate itself. The majority of these 
illiterate children are the children of illiterates and perhaps the descendants 
of generations of illiterates. It is natural that ignorance and illiteracy, being 
incapable of understanding or appreciating the value and the necessity of edu- 
cation, should be indifferent and apathetic toward it — just as natural as it 
is for the children of darkness to love darkness rather than light. The in- 
tervention of the strong arm of the law is the only effective means of saving 
the children of illiteracy from the curse of illiteracy. The intervention of 
the strong arm of the law is, in my opinion, the only hope of saving, also, the 
children of literate, and sometimes intelligent, parents from the carelessness, 
indifference, incompetency, laziness, thriftlessness or selfishness of such 
parents. 

No child is responsible for coming into the world, nor for his environment 
when he comes. Every child has a right to have the chance to develop the 
power to make the most possible of himself in spite of his environment during 
the helpless and irresponsible period of childhood. No man, not even a parent, 
has any right to deprive any child of this inalienable right. This light is 
vouchsafed as a constitutional right to every child in North Carolina by the 
following clauses of our State Constitution : 

"The people have the right to the privilege of education, and it is the duty 
of the State to guard and maintain that right." Article I, section 27. 

"Religion, morality, and knowledge being necessary to good government and 
the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall forever 
be encouraged." Article IX, section 1. 

"Every person presenting himself for registration (to vote) shall be able 
to read and write any section of the Constitution in the English language" 
(which went into "effect December 1, 1908). Article VI, section 4. 

The right of the State to intervene and protect the child in this right and 
to protect itself, society, and humanity against the ignorance of the child is 
recognized and clearly set forth in the following clause in the State Constitu- 
tion : "The General Assembly is hereby empowered to enact that every child 
of sufficient mental and physical ability shall attend the public schools during 
the period between the ages of six and eighteen years for a term of not less 
than sixteen months, unless educated by other means." Article IX, section 15. 

Not only has the child a natural and constitutional right to have the chance 
to develop through education the powers that God has given him, and thereby 
make the most of himself, and. therefore, to have the law intervene, if neces- 
sary, to secure this right to him, but the taxpayer, also, has a right to de- 
mand the intervention of the Government that compels him to pay his taxes 
for the support of the schools, to secure to him the protection that he pays 
for against the ignorance of the child. The Government has the right to 
intervene, if necessary, to protect itself, society, libertj^ and property against 



Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 41 



the dangers to all to be found in ignorance, according to the experience of 
mankind and the evidence of all human histoi'y. If it has the right' to tax 
its citizens for protection, it has the right to adopt the necessary means 
to insure, as far as possible, that protection. If the State or the community 
has the right to correct and punish crime and vice, so often resulting from 
ignorance and illiteracy, it ought to have the right to take the necessary steps 
to remove the cause. Prevention is cheaper and better always than correction 
and punishment. 

Compulsory attendance laws are the only means found effective by other 
States and other countries of the world for overcoming illiteracy or largely 
reducing it. Practically all important foreign countries, except the ignorant 
countries of Russia, Spain, and Turkey, have found it necessary to adopt com- 
pulsoiy attendance laws in order to overcome illiteracy, and have found them 
effective in overcoming it. Thirty-live of the 46 States of the American Union 
have been compelled to resort to the same means of overcoming it, and are 
finding the means effective. Illiteracy is least in the States and countries that 
have compulsory attendance laws, and greatest in those that have not. West 
Virginia and' Kentucky are the only States which may be called Southern 
that have such laws. Eighteen per ce;it of the total white population of the 
United States reside in the Southern States ; 33 per cent of all the white 
illiterates of the United States reside in the Southern States. The compulsory 
attendance States and countries contain more than 80 per cent of all the 
people of the world that we call enlightened and progressive, and are the 
greatest, richest, and most progressive people in the world. No State or 
country in modern times, so far as I have been able to ascertain, has ever 
repealed a compulsory attendance law after it was once enacted. If such 
laws have been found beneficial and effective in all these great States and 
countries, will they prove otherwise for North Carolina? One of the most 
striking illustrations of the effectiveness of compulsory attendance laws in 
reducing illiteracy is that of France. In 1S82 a compulsory education act 
went into effect. At that time 31 per cent of the French people were illit- 
erate ; in 1900, the illiteracy had been reduced to 6 per cent. As bearing 
upon the question of effectiveness of compulsory attendance laws in reducing 
or overcoming illiteracy, the following tables of comparative illiteracy in 
typical Southern States that have no compulsor.y attendance laws and typical 
New England and Western States that have such laws will be interesting and 
suggestive : 

*Table A.— Native White Illiterates Over Ten Years of Age. 

Per Cent. 

Southern States 959,790 12.4 

Virginia 95,583 11.4 

North Carolina 175,325 19.6 

' South Carolina 54,177 13.9 

Georgia 99.948 12.2 

Mississippi 35,432 8.1 

Massachusetts 3,912 0.5 

Rhode Island 1,196 1.0 

Connecticut 1,958 0.6 

Michigan 12,154 1.5 

♦These tables are taken from an excellent paper on Compulsory Education by Prof. W. H. 
Hand, printed in the "Proceedings of the Eighth Conference for Education in the South." 
They are based on the United States Census of 1900. 



42 Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 

*Table B. — Native White Illiterates of Voting Age. 

Per Cent. 

Southern States 307,236 12.2 

Virginia 35,057 12.5 

Nortli Carolina 54,208 19.0 

Soutli Carolina 15,643 12.6 

Georgia 31,914 12.1 

Mississippi 11,613 8.3 

Massachusetts 1,927 0.6 

Rhode Island 550 1.2 

Connecticut 1,040 0.9 

Michigan 6,406 2.2 

*Table C.^Native White Illiterates Between Ten and Fifteen 

Years of Age. 

Southern States 262,590 

Virginia 23,108 

North Carolina 45,632 

South Carolina 17,839 

Georgia 25,941 

Mississippi 10,212 

Massachusetts 416 

Rhode Island 100 

Connecticut 160 

Michigan 1,141 

As bearing upon the effect of illiteracy upon immigration the following table 
will be suggestive. The first column gives the natives of the given State now 
living in other States ; the second column gives the residents of the given 
State born in other States ; the third column gives the loss or the gain the 
given State has sustained. In this table the total population is included : 

Southern States* 3,421,660 2,762.508 659,152 Loss 

Virginia 587,418 132.166 455,252 Loss 

North Carolina 329,625 83,373 246,252 Loss 

South Carolina 233,292 54,518 178.774 Loss 

Georgia .- 410,299 189,889 220,410 Loss 

Mississippi 296,181 215,291 80.890 Loss 

Massachusetts 299,614 401,191 101,577 Gain 

Rhode Island 61.358 78,903 17,545 Gain 

Connecticut 142,254 150,948 8,694 Gain 

Michigan 288,737 407,562 118,825 Gain 

The tide of emigration has evidently flowed from illiterate to literate ; from 
ignorance to intelligence ; from darkness to light. 

To sum up, in view of the fact that only 69.5 per cent of the total school 
population of the State, 71.6 per cent of the White and 65.2 per cent of the 
colored, is ever enrolled in the public schools and only about 45 per cent of 
the white school population and about 38 per cent of the colored is in daily 



*These tables are taken from an excellent paper on Compulsory Education by Prof. W. H. 
Hand, printed in the "Proceedings of the Eighth Conference for Education in the South." 
They are based on the United States Census of 1900. 



WoKK TO Be Done and How to Do It. 43 

attendance; in view of the large number of illiterates, white and colored, and 
of the large number of children of school age on the straight road to illiteracy 
in North Carolina, can any honest citizen doubt the need of the intervention 
of the strong arm of the law through compulsory attendance to overcome such 
conditions? In view of the constitutional provisions guaranteeing to every 
child the privilege of education and imposing upon the State the duty to 
provide it and encourage the means for it, and of the constitutional amendment 
recently adopted prescribing an educational qualification for suffrage and citi- 
zenship ; in view of the divine right of every child to make the most possible 
of himself in spite of any sort of environment in childhood, for which he can 
in no sense be held responsible, can any citizen fail to recognize the constitu- 
tional and the natural right of every child to have guaranteed to him the 
opportunity to get an education and the duty of the law to intervene to pre- 
vent any man from depriving any child of this natural and constitutional right? 
In view of the fundamental fact established by the experience of mankind that 
in universal education is to be found the best pi-otection to life, liberty and 
property, and that, therefore, it is right and wise for the Government to tax 
every citizen- to provide the means of miiversal education, and thereby secure 
protection to himself and to every other citizen ; in view of the further fact that 
every citizen taxed for this purpose has the right to demand from the Govern- 
ment compelling him to pay the tax the protection that he has paid for against 
the ignorance of every child, can any reasonable man doubt the right and the 
duty of the State and the community to compel the child to use the means 
of protection provided, and to intervene to prevent the parent from preventing 
the child from using them? In view of the further fact that compulsory at- 
tendance laws are the only means found effective in all other States and in all 
fox'eign countries for reducing and overcoming illiteracy, is not any I'easonable 
man forced to the conclusion that North Carolina, will be compelled to resort 
to the same means in order to bring all of her children into the schools pro- 
vided for them and thus reduce illiteracy and secure to every child his right, 
to the Government its safety, and to the taxpayer the protection that he pays 
for? 

There is already considerable sentiment in the State for a compulsory attend- 
ance law, and the sentiment seems to be increasing. The conditions are so 
different in different sections and different comities of the State that it might 
not be wise to pass a State compulsory attendance law and undertake to put 
it into operation at once in every part of the State. It is safest not to force 
public opinion, but to cultivate it along right lines with patience and pei'sist- 
ence and tact. In communities and counties in which the conditions are favor- 
able for it, and in which a healthy public sentiment demands it or can be 
brought to demand it, I can see no good reason now why compulsory attend- 
ance should not be adopted and enforced. There are already many such com- 
munities, and even some entire counties. 

Compulsory Attendance Acts of 1907 and 1909. — The General Assembly of 
1907 passed a compulsoi-y attendance law, which was amended by the General 
Assembly of 1909. All the machinery necessary for the successful execution 
of the law is set forth in the act, and the County Board of Education is author- 
ized to put the law into execution for any school, school district, township, 
upon vote of a majority of the qualified voters therein, in an election duly 
ordered and held, or upon a petition of a majority of the parents of the chil- 



44 Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 

dren of school age therein. It is left in the discretion of the County Board 
of Education to order the election or to grant the petition without election, or 
to yefuse to do either. 

Only a few districts have as yet availed themselves of this law and adopted 
compulsory attendance. It seems to be working well in those districts. It is 
hoped that many more districts will avail themselves of it during the next two 
years, and it is contemplated to have a campaign next summer for the culti- 
vation of sentiment for compulsory attendance in many communities where 
conditions for it are favorable. Good roads and transportation of pupils will 
greatly increase attendance and open the way for a wider adoption and enforce- 
ment of our compulsory attendance law. 

Improvement of Teachers and Increase of Teachers' Salaries. — "Without 
the vitalizing touch of a properly qualified teacher, houses, grounds, and 
eciuipment are largely dead mechanism. It is the teacher that breathes the 
breath of life into the school. Better schools are impossible without better 
teachers. Better teachers are impossible without better education, better 
training, and better opportunities for them to obtain such education and train- 
ing. Better education and better training and the utilization of better oppor- 
tunities for these by teachers are impossible without better pay for teachers. 
Reason as we may about it, gush as we may about the nobility of the work 
and the glorious rewards of it hereafter, back of this question of better 
teachers must still lie the cold business question of better pay. 

"The average salary of rural white teachers in North Carolina in 1910 was 
.$34 47 ; the average salary of colored teachers was $23.48 ; the average length 
of the rural school term was 92.7 days for white and 81.7 days for colored ; 
making the average annual salary of rural white teachers in North Carolina, 
therefore, $159.79, and the average annual salary of rural colored teachers 
$95.91. For such meager salaries men and women cannot afford to put them- 
selves into the long and expensive training necessary for the best equipment 
for this delicate and difficult work of teaching. The State may supply the 
best oppoi*tunities that the age affords for the training of the teachers, but, as 
long as the rank aud file of them receive such meager salaries, these oppor- 
tunities will be beyond their reach, and they must inevitably divide their atten- 
tion between the service of two masters to make even a. bare living. As long 
as they must work at some other business for six or eight mouths of the year, 
and at the business of school-teaching for only four or five months, they can 
scarcely hope to become professional and masterful teachers. The teacher who 
does something else eight months of the year for a living and teaches school 
four mouths of the year for extra money must continue to be more of something 
else than a teacher. 

"With short school terms, small salaries, poor schoolhouses. aud other con- 
ditions adverse to success, we cannot hope to command and retain first-class 
talent in this business of teaching the rural school, however good or however 
accessible the opportunities for improviug teachers may be made. We must, 
in the outset, face the cold business truth that, as the South comes more and 
more rapidly into her industrial and agricultural heritage, aud the channels 
of profitable employment multiply, the best men and women in the profession 
of teaching cannot be retained in it, aud little inducement will be offered to 
other men aud women of ambition, ability, aud promise to enter it, unless the 
compensation for the teacher's service is made somewhat commensurate with 



WoKK TO Be Done and How to Do It. 45 

that offored iu other fields of labor. As long as the animal salary paid the 
teacher \Yho works upon the immortal stuff of mhid and soul is less than that 
paid the rudest workers iu wood aud iron, less than that paid the man that 
shoes your horse or plows your corn or paints your house or keeps your jail, 
the best talent cannot be secured and kept iu the teaching profession — ^the 
teaching profession must continue to be made iu many instances but a stepping- 
stone to more profitable employments or a means of pensioning ineflicient and 
needy mediocrity. 

"The first step, then, iu the direction of improvement of teachers is an 
increase in the salary of teachers so as to make it worth the while of capable 
men aud women to enter the professlou of teaching, to remain iu it, to put 
themselves in training for it, aud to avail themselves of the opportunity 
ofi:"ered for improvement. An increase in the monthly compensation and an 
increase in the annual school term are the only two ways of increasing the 
teacher's salary. The only means of increasing the compensation and the 
school term is by increasing the available school funds for each school. The 
only practical means of doing this under present conditions are consolidation 
and local taxation. 

"That the counties and districts that pay the best salaries secure, as a 
rule, the best teachers, is the best evidence that this question of better teachers 
is largely a question of better salaries. With the growth of educational senti- 
ment aud enthusiasm the demand for better teachers has grown, but every 
community that demands a better teacher ought to remember that the demand 
is unreasonable and unlikely to be met unless the means for better pay be pro- 
vided by the community. 

"The raising of the standard of examination and gradation of teachers will 
be ineffective, and perhaps unfair, unless it is accompanied by a corresponding 
increase iu the wages of teachers. Of what avail will it be to raise the require- 
ments without raising the compensation, when even now. with the present low 
standard of qualifications, it is almost impossible in many counties to get 
enough teachers to teach the schools, aud when even now the same qualifica- 
tions will command much better compensation in almost any other vocation? 
The logical result of raising the standard of examination aud gradation with- 
out raising the prices paid would be to decrease the supply of teachers and 
render it practically impossible to supply the schools with teachers. Au 
increase iu the requirements for teaching, a multiplication of the opportunities 
for the improvement of teachers, and a mandatory requirement of teachers to 
avail themselves of these opportunities, must, in all reason and fairness, be 
accompanied by a corresponding increase in salary. Better work deserves and 
commands better pay." 

The increase in teachers' salaries during the past ten years has not been at 
all commensurate with the increase in living expenses, and with the increase in 
salaries and wages of those engaged in other professions and callings. In con- 
sidering this question of the salary of the teacher, it must be remembered that 
the teacher must live twelve months in the year, even though he receives 
salary for only four or five or six months. The financial demands upon the 
teachers must also be i-emembered. They must live and dress well in order to 
command the respect of the children and the patrons. To maintain their pro- 
fessional growth and increase the effectiveness of their work, they must spend 
a considerable part of their salary for special courses of work in summer 



46 Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 

schools and institutes, and for tlae purchase of professional boolvs and maga- 
zines. It must be remembered, also, that teachers must look forward to the 
years when it will be impossible for them to teach, for, as they grow old, they 
become less efficient for the arduous work of the school. Their salaries, there- 
fore, should be sufficient to lay aside something for old age, as no pensions 
are provided for teachers. Finally, it should be remembered that in a republic 
the intelligence, morality, power, effectiveness, and earning capacity of the 
common people are dependent largely upon the work of the teachers of the 
public schools, and that, therefore, their work is of the most vital importance, 
and should command a salary commensurate with its importance. Unless we 
can bring our people to a realization of these truths and thereby create a pub- 
lic sentiment and a public demand for better salaries for better teachers, the 
ranks of the rural school teachers will continue to be filled with many im- 
trained, incompetent, inexperienced persons, using this holiest of callings as a 
mere stepping-stone to some other profession or calling, with mere tyros with- 
out serious purpose teaching for a short time simply to make a support until 
something better turns up. There will continue to be a dearth of men, be- 
cause they can command better salaries for almost anything, even for bi'eaking 
rocks on the road, than for teaching rural schools a few months in the year. 
There will continue to be a dearth of trained and experienced women of power, 
because such women can now easily command far better salaries in other call- 
ings open to women, and almost any woman can command a larger annual 
salary for measuring calico and selling buttons than for training minds, inspir- 
ing souls and forming characters in the rural schools. The situation is serious. 
The demand for good teachers, and especially for good male teachers, is greatly 
in excess of the supply, because the salaries paid will not command and retain 
such teachers. Let us wage a campaign from mountain to sea, through press 
and public speech, for the education of public sentiment to an appreciation of 
the teacher's w^ork and to an insistent demand for better compensation for 
that work. 

County Institutes and Summer Schools. — In accordance with the recommen- 
dations in my previous Biennial Report, the General Assembly amended the 
county institute law and provided a Supervisor of Teacher-training. By virtue 
of these amendments, as has been pointed out in a previous part of this Report, 
and as will appear from the report of the work of the teachers' institutes and 
teachers' associations elsewhere in this Report, the county institutes and the 
county teachers' associations and the teachers' reading circles have been made 
effective means for the Improvement and home training of the rank and file of 
the rural teachers. As I have recommended elsewhere, I believe provision 
should be made for conducting summer schools for teachers at all of the State 
educational institutions, thereby further increasing the means for placing, at 
small expense, within easy reach of the rural teachers still better opportunities 
for professional improvement. With a good system of county institutes, county 
teachers' associations, county reading circles, summer schools, permanent 
normal schools, the State Normal and Industrial College and departments of 
education at the University and several of our denominational colleges, profes- 
sional improvement ought to be within easy reach of any teacher; and there 
ought to be within a few years marked improvement in the teaching force of the 
State. 



Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 47 

County Supervision. — "As pointed out in the first part of this Report, there 
has been marked improvement in comity supervision. Tlie average salary 
of the County Superintendent has been more than trebled since 1901. The 
superintendents in nearly all the counties of the State are devoting more 
time to the work than ever before, but there is still much work to be done 
before county supervision can be made as efficient as it should be. The more 
I learn of the educational work of the State in the discharge of my official 
duties and thi'ough my visitations and field work, the more clearly I see that 
the real strategic point in all this work to-day is the County Superintendent. 
Upon this subject I beg to quote from my annual address to the State Associa- 
tion of County Superintendents delivered November 11, 1903: 'The work of 
the State Superintendent must be done and his plans executed largely through 
the County Superintendent. The work of the County Board of Education 
must be carried on and its plans executed largely through the County Super- 
intendent. The work of the school committeemen will not be done properly 
without the stimulation and direction of the Covmty Superintendent. No 
proper standard of qualifications for teachers can be maintained and en- 
forced except by the County Superintendent. No esprit de corps among the 
teachers can be awakened and sustained save by a county superintendent in 
whom it dwells. No local and permanent plans for the improvement of public 
school teachers through county teachers' associations, summer institutes and 
schools, township meetings, etc., can be set on foot and successfully carried 
out save under the leadership of an energetic county superintendent. All 
campaigns for the education of public sentiment on educational questions and 
for the advancement of the work of public education along all needful lines 
are doomed to failure or, at least, to only partial and temporary success 
withovit the active help and direction of a county superintendent knowing his 
people, knowing the conditions and needs of his county, knowing something of 
the prejudices and preferences of the different communities, endowed with 
tact, wisdom, common sense, character, grit, and some ability to get along 
with folks, and enjoying the confidence of teachers, officers, children, and 
patrons. Upon the County Superintendent mainly must depend the bringing 
together of all those forces in the county — public and private, moral and 
religious, business and professional — that may be utilized for the advancement 
of the educational work of the county and for the awakening of an educa- 
tional interest among all classes of people, irrespective of poverty or wealth, 
religion or politics. This work of educating the children of all the people is 
too great a task to be performed by any part of the people. No real coimty 
system, composed of a large number of separate schools unified and correlated 
ia their work, each pursuing a properly arranged and wisely planned course 
of study in the subjects required, and the whole system fitting into its proper 
place in a great State system, can ever be worked out save through the aid 
and under the direction of a county superintendent with an adequate concep- 
tion of his work and with an ability to do it.' 

"Such a work requires for its successful execution a man of mind and 
heart and soul, a gentleman, a man of common sense, tact, energy, consecrated 
purpose, education, special training, and business ability — a man who can 
give all his time and thought and energy to the work. You cannot command 
the services of such a man in any business without paying him a living sal- 
ary, for such men are in great demand for any work. May we not hope. 



48 Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 

therefore, that at no distant day the sah^ry attached to so important an office 
may be sufficient in every county to employ trained and competent men for 
all their time, to unfetter the earnest, competent men already engaged in the 
work so that they may have a chance to do their best work and show what 
is in them, and to justify men in the coming years in placing themselves in 
special training for this special work? 

"It is noticeable and significant that educational progress along all lines is 
more rapid in those counties in which competent superintendents have been 
put into the field for all their time, and that in almost every county in which 
this has been done the school fund has been increased by local taxation and 
by economical management of the finances, looking carefully after the sources 
of income, much more than the increase in the salary of the superintendent. 
For example, in Guilford County, the Superintendent's salary was increased 
$1,000 a year, and during the first year of his administration, largely through 
his efforts, the annual school fund was increased by local taxation alone 
$7,745. In Pitt County the efficient Superintendent was put into the field for 
his entire time at increased salary, and already the annual increase in the 
school fund from local taxation, secured mainly through his activity, is much 
more than the increase in his salaiy, to say nothing of the remarkable increase 
in the efficiency of the entire county system of schools resulting from his more 
efficient work. Similar evidence could be given about other counties. You 
cannot make a success of any great business like this business of education 
without a man at its head devoting all his time, thought and energy to it. 
Wherever this is the case the educational work of the county is moving, 
wherever it is not the case the work is lagging. You cannot do anything 
worth doing in the world without a man. It is the highest economy to put 
money into a man." 

More Money and How to Get it. — For all this work yet to be done in the 
way of building and improving schoolhouses and grounds, lengthening the 
school term, increasing the salaries of teachers and county superintendents, 
providing high-school instruction, etc., more money must, of course, be pro- 
vided. Two ways of providing this money may be suggested: 

1. The adoption and enforcement of some plan for getting taxable prop- 
erty on the tax books and assessing it at its real value, or something near its 
real value. An examination of the tables of the statistical reports in this 
volume showing -the school funds raised in each coiuity from the property 
tax of 18 cents on the $100 and of the list of counties asking aid from the 
special State appropriation for a four-months school term, and the amounts 
received by these counties from this appropriation, will convince any 
reasonable man, I think, that there is something wrong in the method of 
assessing the value of property. Fifty-four counties now receive aid in 
amounts varying from $95.25 to $4,462.99 for a four-months school term. 
Upon any reasonable and uniform valuation of property, many of these 
counties would have money enough for a four-months school term without 
any aid from the special State appropriation, and the others would need 
much less from this source. Much of this special appropriation could then 
be available for other needed purposes in strengthening the public school sys- 
tem. To one who has traveled through many of these counties and observed 
their prosperity and rapidly increasing wealth, it is self-evident that there 
is something wrong in the method of assessing property, when comities like 



Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 49 

Cleveland, Cumberland, and a number of others that might be mentioned, 
fail to receive from an 18 cents property tax enough money for a four- 
months school term at the present low salaries of teachers. Upon a correct 
valuation of property, of course, the school fund derived from this 18 cents 
property tax would be largely increased in every county. In my opinion, 
if all the property in the State could be placed on the tax books at a fair and 
reasonable valuation, the public school fund would be sufficient to maintain 
the public schools of the State for an average school term of five or six 
months without any increase of the present rate of taxation for school pur- 
poses. 

2. The second means for getting more money for the schools is by an 
increase of the State levy in the comities for school purposes and by levying 
a special county tax for schools. As recommended and explained in another 
part of this Report, an increase of the school tax from 18 cents to 25 cents 
on the $100 valuation of property would largely increase the school fund and 
greatly improve the school system. Under the decision of the Supreme Court 
in the case of Collie v. Ccmimissioners of Franlclin Couniif, the County Com- 
missioners, upon demand of the County Board of Education, are required to 
levy a special tax on all property and polls of the county sufficient to provide 
at least a four-months school term in every school district of the county, as 
directed by Article IX, section 3. of the Constitution. In their estimate of 
the additional funds necessary for this purpose to be raised by a separate 
county tax, the County Board of Education can, of cou^-se, take into con- 
sideration the needs of the schools for their gradual and conservative im- 
I)rovement in equipment, supervision, teachers, etc. This opens the way for 
a sufficient increase in the school fund in the weak counties to increase 
greatlj' the efficiency of the schools in those counties. 

Local Taxation. — "This business of public education is like any other great 
business. For successfully conducting it, enough capital must be invested in 
it to supply the necessai-y equipment and to employ the necessary number of 
competent trained men and women to carry on the business according to mod- 
ern progressive business and professional principles. I have . undertaken to 
show in this Report that for better houses and equipment, better teachers, 
better supervision and longer school terms more money is the fundamental 
need. The constitutional limit of taxation has already been reached in 
all the counties of the State but one. Without an amendment to the Con- 
stitution, therefore, or special legislation for each county, the general school 
fund cannot be increased except for a four-months term. A special annual 
State appropriation of $225,000 has already been made to the public schools 
by the General Assembly. Under present conditions the State can hardly 
be expected to increase the school fund for a four-months term further by 
special appropriation. It must be very evident, therefore, to every thought- 
ful man that in addition to the methods suggested above the only other two 
means of supplying this fundamental need of more money for the public 
schools are consolidation and local taxation. As heretofore shown in this 
Report, by reasonable consolidation the present available funds can be greatly 
economized by reducing the number of schools and the number of teachers 
necessary to teach a given number of children. In this way more money from 
the present funds will be available for each school for more teachers, better 

Part I — i 



50 WoEK TO Be Done and How to Do It. 

salaries, better houses and equipment, and a longer term. After making the 
present available funds go as far as possible through the economy of reason- 
able consolidation, the only other means of increasing the school fund of any 
local school is local taxation. 

"Under section 4115 of the School Law, upon a petition of one-fourth of the 
freeholders residing therein, a special-tax district may be laid off within any 
definitely fixed boundaries, and upon approval of the County Board of Educa- 
tion an election upon a local tax for the schools within that district, not to 
exceed 30 cents on the $100 and 90 cents on the poll, must be ordered 
by the County Board of Commissioners. This places an election upon 
local taxation for public schools within easy reach of any comity, town- 
ship, or school district in North Carolina. I have already reported the 
progress in local taxation during the past two years. While it is encouraging, 
still, when it is remembered that only about 995 districts out of a total of 
about 5,37.3 white districts in the State have yet adopted local taxation, it 
will be readily seen that the work of local taxation is scarcely more than well 
begun. 

"Sixty-nine per cent of all the money raised for public schools in the United 
States is raised by local taxation. Nearly one-fifth of all the funds expended 
for the maintenance of the public schools in North Carolina is now raised by 
local taxation. In all the States having systems of public schools well 
equipped and adequate to the education of all their people, a large per cent 
of the public school fund is raised by local taxation. In some of these States 
as much as 95 per cent is raised by local taxation. In North Carolina the 
only towns, cities, and rural communities that have succeeded in providing 
a system of schools open eight or ten months in the year, adequately equipped 
with houses and teachers, have been compelled to supplement their State and 
county school funds by local taxation. The experience of other States and of 
these communities in our own State compels the conclusion that the only hope 
of largely increasing the present available funds for the rural schools, and thus 
making these schools equal to the demands of the age and adequate to the 
education of 82 per cent of our population, is to be found in the adoption of 
local taxation. 

"The principle of local taxation is right and wise. It involves the princi- 
ples of self-help, self-interest, self-i)rotection, community help, community inter- 
est, and community protection. Every cent of the money paid by local taxation 
for schools by any community remains in the community for the improvement 
of the community school, and every cent of it is invested through a better 
school in the minds and souls and characters of the rising generation, in an 
increase in the intelligence and efficiency of the entire community. Every cent 
of this local tax that goes into a better school to give the children of all a 
better chance to be somebody and to do something in the world is invested in 
the best possible advertisement for the best class of immigration and is the 
surest possible means of keeping in the community the best people already 
residing there by giving them a better opportunity to give their children a 
better chance to get an education that will better fit them for coping witli the 
world without having to move into another community to get it. Every cent of 
money, therefore, invested by local taxation in a better school, by inviting a 
better class of immigration and preventing the disastrous drain uiwn its best 
blood by other communities that offer better school facilities, enhances the 



WoKK TO Be Done aimd How to Do It. 51 

value of every cent of property iii the community by increasiuy the demand 
for it by the best people. The wisdom, then, of such a tax for such a purpose 
is too manifest to need further argument." 

School houses. — There are still 204 white and 121 colored school districts 
in North Carolina to be supplied with houses. There are 94 white and 160 
colored log houses, and many old frame houses unfit for use, to be replaced. 
There are hundreds of old houses to be repaired, enlarged, equipped, and beau- 
tified. The equipment of most of the old houses is poor and entirely inade- 
(juate. Some idea of the inadequacy of this equipment may be obtained when 
it is remembered that in 1910 only $45,834.91 was spent for furniture and 
equipment for rural schoolhouses. A comfortable, well-equipped schoolhouse 
is the first essential of a successful school. Such a house insures permanency 
and inspires in children and patrons pride and confidence. 

In every county there should be a strict enforcement of the law placing the 
building of schoolhouses under the control of the County Board of Education, 
and requiring all new houses to be constructed in accordance with plans 
approved by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction and that board. 
A revised and enlarged pamphlet of approved plans for schoolhouses has been 
recently issued from the oflice of the State Superintendent of Tublic Instruc- 
tion, and copies of it can be secured upon application. The pamphlet contains 
bills of materials, specifications, cuts, floor plans, blank contracts, etc., for the 
erection of any house in it. 

The law requiring the contract for buildings to be in writing and the house 
to be inspected, received, and approved by the County Superintendent before 
full payment is made should always be rigidly enforced. No more money _ 
should be allowed to be wasted on cheap, temporary, improperly constructed 
houses. Properly enforced, the law is now ample to insure the construction 
(if permanent, comfortable schoolhouses and to prevent the impositions of 
inefficient contractors and builders. 

School Districts and Consolidation. — In my preceding biennial reports this 
subject has been so fully discussed that I deem it unnecessary to enter into 
any full discussion of it again. Much good work has been done in reason- 
able consolidation and enlargement of districts. With much benefit to their 
school interests, some counties have been entirely redistricted. Hundreds of 
unnecessary little districts have been abolished, but in many counties there 
are still too many of these little districts. There are still 5,373 white school 
districts and 2,-306 colored school districts. The average area of the white 
school district in the State is 9.0 square miles. The white school districts 
might be decreased to half the present number, where streams, swamps, etc., 
do not prevent, and the average size might be increased to double the present 
area, and still, as a little calculation will show, in a district of fairly regular 
size with a schoolhouse near the center, the farthest child would be within 
three miles of the house, and a large majority of the children would, of course, 
be much nearer. The decrease in the number of school districts means, of 
course, an increase in the money for each district, an increase in the number 
of children in each school, an increase in the number of schools with more than 
one teacher, affording instruction in more advanced branches of study, a better 
classification of the children, a reduction in the number of classes necessary 
for each teacher, an increase in the time that each teacher can give to each 
class, a concentration of the energies of the teacher upon fewer subjects, a 



52 WoKK TO Be Done and How to Do It. 

stimulation of ttie cliildreu to greater effort by the greater competition and 
greater mental friction of larger numbers. 

This work of enlarging the school districts by the consolidation of unnec- 
essary small districts or by redistricting townships and counties must, of 
course, be carried on with wisdom, discretion, and -justice. Every child has a 
right to be within reasonable walking distance of some school until conditions 
and funds justify provision for transportation ; but any healthy child can 
better afford to walk two or three miles to get to a good school than to attend 
a poor one at his gate. It is wiser and more economical to have one school 
taught in one good house with two or three good teachers than to have two or 
three little schools in poor little one-room houses, taught by one teacher with a 
handful of children, with almost as many classes as children. For a fuller 
and more detailed discussion, however, of this subject and of the extravagance 
and vmwisdom of a multiplicity of unnecessary little districts, I beg to x-efer 
you to my preceding biennial reports. 

Transportation of Pupils. — It is hoped that in the near future improvement 
in roads and rural conditions will warrant consolidation of schools on a larger 
scale, and the adoption of transportation of children by wagons and teams to 
central schools, which is now in successful operation in many Western States. 
Transportation is also in successful operation in a nmnber of districts in 
Virginia and Louisiana. 

The State Superintendent recently visited, for observation and study, a 
number of centralized rural schools in Indiana and Ohio, where transportation 
of pupils is in most successful operation. All of the schools in some townships 
had been consolidated into one central school ; in others were found but two or 
three schools in the entire township. These schools covered areas of from 20 
to 50 square miles. Children were transported to them from distances of from 
1 to 7 miles. The schools were conducted in houses costing from $8,000 to 
$30,000, with heating plants and modern conveniences, such as you would find 
in our large towns. 

The schools had from four to ten teachers, affording to the country children, 
in houses, equipment, supervision, teachers, libraries, gradation, classification, 
high-school instruction, all the educational advantages of our best town schools, 
with the added advantage in all instances of rural environment, and in some 
instances of practical instruction in agriculture, sewing, cooking, and other 
subjects pertaining to country life and home-making. Among other advantages 
observed in these centralized rural schools, were a most commendable pride and 
school spirit on the part of teachers, children, school officers, and patrons, 
excellent attendance, protection of the health of the children by prevention of 
exposure to bad weather, etc., economy of time in reaching school and home. 
In some of these schools the daily attendance for the month was found to be 
98 per cent of the school population ; the lowest attendance reported was 89 
per cent of the school population. 

The transportation is at the expense of the township in neat, comfortable, 
covered two-horse wagons, each wagon carrying about twenty children. The 
wagons run on schedule time and tardiness is practically eliminated, as is also 
irregularity of attendance on account of bad weather. The drivers of the 
wagons are usually farmers of the community of character and reliability, who 
are held responsible for the safety and good conduct of the children to and 
from school. The wagons are owned in most instances by the township, and 



Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 53 

the horses arc owned and furnished by the drivers. The wagons are operated 
at a monthly cost of from $40 to $G0. Some of the schools operate as many 
as ten wagons, the nxmaber varying from three to ten. Space forbids that I 
give fuller details of my study of these schools at this time. 

The results of my visit and observations convinced me that in consolidation, 
with transportation of pupils, is to be found the only solution of the problem 
of placing adequate educational facilities within reach of country boys and 
girls in sparsely populated farming districts. I believe that the conditions in 
some of our counties in North Carolina are such as to warrant at once begin- 
ning in some townships consolidation by transportation, and I have recom- 
mended elsewhere in this Report that the public school law be so amended 
as to authorize county boards of education to inaugurate transportation of 
pupils where the conditions and the funds justify it. 

Better Classification and More Thorough Instruction. — Through the use of 
a graded course of study sent out in pamphlet form from my office and the 
new registers and new blanks for teachers' reports, some good work has been 
done in classifying and grading the rural public schools. Much more remains 
still to be done. Upon this subject I beg to quote from my previous Biennial 
Report : 

"A recent inquiry concerning the course of study and the classification of 
pupils in the public schools of the State reveals a great lack of uniformity 
and, in some coimties of the State, a somewhat chaotic condition. 1 sent to 
all county superintendents blanks for reports of the daily programs and of 
the progress made by the various classes. These blanks were sent to the 
public school teachers, and the superintendents were requested to send the 
best ten to my office. A careful examination of these and a compilation of 
their contents showed that the average number of recitations in the school 
with one teacher undertaking to give instruction in all subjects required by 
law to be taught in the public schools varied from 35 to 55. 

"In order to give instruction in all the subjects the teaching of which is 
made mandatory under the law, at least 21 recitations a day will be required. 
The legal length of a school day is six hours, hence an average of only twelve 
minutes could be allotted to a recitation in any school with only one teacher. 
The folly of even expecting thorough and successful instruction in so many sub- 
jects in so many classes by one teacher is apparent without argument. The 
need for a better classification so as to reduce the classes to the smallest pos- 
sible nmnber, thereby giving the longest possible time to each class, is also 
apparent. Owing to the different ages of the children,, ranging from six to 
twenty-one years, and the different degrees of advancement, about as many 
classes will be necessary in a school with one teacher as in a school with two 
or more teachers, the chief difference being, of course, in the number of chil- 
dren in a class. Unless some means, therefore, can be found for increasing 
the number of schools with two or more teachers and decreasing the number 
of schools with only one teacher I see but little hope of successful instruction 
in any of the high-school branches or of improving materially the instruc- 
tion even in the elementary branches known as the common school branches. 
It is apparent that in a well-classified school with two or three teachers, with 
few if any more classes than a school with one teacher, each teacher will 
have two or three times as much time for each class, and will be able to con- 
centrate his thought and energies upon fewer classes and subjects and, conse- 



54 Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 

quently, to do more thorough teaching in those subjects, and that at least one 
of the teachers would have time for instruction of the older children in the 
higher branches. I have been so firmly convinced of the impossibility of 
thorough instiniction by one teacher in more than the elementary branches, 
that I have advised in the preface to the Course of Study that only in excep- 
tional cases should instruction in any higher branches ever be undertaken in 
any school with only one teacher. (The law now limits instruction in one- 
teacher schools to the elementary branches.) 

"The only means of reducing the number of schools with only one teacher 
and getting more schools with two or more teachers and the better classifica- 
tion, more thorough instruction and more advanced work so necessary for the 
growth and development of our public school system are to be found in 
reasonable consolidation and local taxation. By means of consolidation more 
teachers and more children can be brought together into one school, and by 
means of local taxation more money will be available for the employment of 
more teachers at better salaries and for the lengthening of the school term. 
In the meantime, through the adoption of the graded course of study hereto- 
fore referred to, and its enforcement iu all the public schools, the work of the 
public schools can be greatly improved in unifoi'mity, definiteness, thorough- 
ness, and classification." There has, of course, been marked improvement in 
classifying and grading the rural public schools since 1904, but there is still 
great need for reducing the number of classes and the number of subjects 
in the one-teacher school, in order to secure more thoroughness in the few 
essentials, and also great need for increasing the number of two-teacher 
schools. 

The Education of the Negro. — As the conditions have not changed since my 
last report, and as I have seen no reason to change my views upon the subject 
of the education of the negro, I shall repeat here the views expressed in my 
preceding Biennial Report, changing only the figures used in that report so as 
to conform to the correct figin-es for this biennial period. 

"It would be easier and more pleasant for me to close this report without 
undertaking to discuss this most pei-plexing problem of the education of the 
negro, about which there are so many conflicting and widely divergent views 
among my people. This is a part, however, of the educational problem of the 
State and, in some respects, the most diflicult part. It is, therefore, my duty to 
study it and to give to you and through you to the General Assembly and to 
the people my honest views about it. He is a coward that basely runs away 
from a manifest duty. 

"In considering this question of negro education it is necessary to lay aside, 
so far as iwssible, prejudice on the one hand and maudlin sentimentality on 
the other. There has been too much of both. For an expression of my gen- 
eral views upon this question I beg to refer you to my Report for 1900-1902, 
pages 6 to 12. I have seen no reason to change or materially to modify these 
general views. 

"In justice to the negro and for the information of some of our people who 
have been misled into thinking that too large a part of the taxes that the 
white people pay is spent for the education of the negro, it may be well in the 
outset to give a brief statement of the facts in regard to the apportionment of 
the school fund. As is well known, under section 4116 of the School Law, the 
apportionment of the school fund in each county is practically placed abso- 



Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 55 

lutely under the control of the County Board of Education, the only restr'ic- 
tion laid upon the board therein being that the funds shall be apportioned 
among the schools of each township in such a way as to give equal lengtli of 
term as nearly as possible, having due regard to the grade of work to bo done, 
the qualifications of the teachers, etc. The Constitution directs that in the 
distribution of the fund no discrimination shall be made in favor of either 
race. This report shows that in 1910 the negroes of city and rural districts 
received for teachers' salaries and building schoolhouses $373,3!^0.55 for 
238,091 children of school age. The whites received for the same purpose for 
497,077 children of school age $1,924,704.40. The negroes, therefore, constitute 
about 32 per cent of the school population and receive in the apportionment 
for the same purposes less than 17 per cent of the school money. This report 
shows that the negroes paid for schools in taxes on their own property and 
polls about $163,417.89, or nearly one-half of all that they received for school 
piu'poses. Add to this their just share of fines, forfeitures and penalties, 
and their share of the large school tax paid by corporations to which they 
are entitled under the Constitution by every dictate of reason and justice, 
and it will be apparent that the part of the taxes actually paid by individual 
white men for the education of the negro is so small that the man that would 
begrudge it or complain about it ought to be ashamed of himself. In the 
face of these facts, any unprejudiced man must see that we are in no danger 
of giving the negroes more than they are entitled to by every dictate of 
justice, right, wisdom, humanity, and Christianity. 

"Their teachers are not so well qualified and have not spent so much money 
on their education, their expenses of living are much less and, therefore, 
they do not need and ought not to have as much per capita for the education 
of their children ; but there is more real danger of doing the negro an injus- 
tice in the apportionment of the school fund, even after considering all these 
things, by withholding his equitable part, than of doing the white race any 
injustice by giving him too much. 

"When we are apportioning only $373,390.-55 for the education of 238.091 
negro children — and some of us are complaining about that — we need not be 
entertaining many hopes of giving the negro much helpful industrial education 
yet, for everybody ought to know that this amount is not sufficient to give this 
number of children thorough instruction in the mere rudiments of reading, 
writing, and arithmetic, so essential to civilized living and intelligent, efficient 
service in the humblest calling of life. As long as we are appropriating only 
this much money for this number of children, nobody need have any real 
concern about turning the negro's head by the study of Latin and Greek and 
other higher branches of learning. The fact is that at present we are not 
giving or seeking to give the negro in the public schools more than instruction 
in the mere rudiments of learning, nor is it possible with our present avail- 
able funds to give him more than this. No one believes more thoroughly 
than I in industrial and agi'icultural education for the negro ; but, as pointed 
out above, however desirable it may be, such education for the majority of 
negroes is hardly to be considered imless we put more money into their 
schools. 

"The negro is here among us through no fault of his own, and is likely to 
remain here. There are but two roads open to him. One is elevation through 
the right sort of education ; the other is deterioration and degradation through 



56 WoKK TO Be Done and How to Do It. 

ignorance and miseducation, inevitably leading to expulsion or extermination. 
We must help him into the first if we can. If we do not our race will pay 
the heaviest penalty for the failure. 

"My experience and observation in this work and my larger acquaintance 
with the people of the State and their feelings have deepened my conviction 
that the only hope in education beyond the point of mastery of the rudiments 
of learning for the negro race is to be found in agricultural and industrial 
training — largely in agricultural training. Unless we can give him such train- 
ing in the schools as will help to make him a more industrious and efficient 
workman and to save him from vice and idleness, the negro race is doomed ; 
and vmless we can demonstrate this objectively to the white people of the 
South through living epistles of the lives and characters of the negroes so 
educated, they will find a way, justly or unjustly, to withdraw all their aid 
to his education. The opponents of negro education contend that the sort of 
education the negro has been receiving in the public schools has put false 
notions into his head, has turned him away from work and encouraged him to 
make a living by his wits without work. They point to the superiority of the 
old-issue negro over the new-issue negi'o in character, industry, reliability and 
in nearly all the virtues that make up good citizenship. The contrast between 
the negro of the old school and the modern negro is too often to the detriment 
of the modern negro. 

"These opponents of negro education, with the lack of logic characteristic 
of the man who draws general conclusions from a few particulars and sees 
only what is superficially discernible without looking for deeper and more far- 
reaching causes, ascribe the cause of this difference to the little education that 
the negro has received. The modern negro has had some sort of education 
and the old-issue negro had none ; therefore, they argue, education is the cause 
of the inferiority of the modern negro. They forget that the best of the old 
negroes were trained in the best industrial schools, on farms and in shops 
for the work that they were to do in life, under the direction of intelligent 
masters ; that in many instances the intimacy of relation between them and 
the families of humane masters afforded them an environment, association 
and example tha"t proved most potent in shaping and strengthening their 
characters ; and that the whole social system of the old regime was conducive 
to training the negro in obedience, self-restraint and industry. Though 
these old negroes were ignorant of books, they were, from earliest infancy, 
trained and educated in many of the essentials of good citizenship and 
efficient service. The present generation of negroes has been given a mere 
smattering of the essentials of knowledge and left untrained in those other 
things so essential to life and happiness and progress. The new generation, 
without preparation, were ushered into freedom and have been left to follow 
largely their own will without direction or restraint, sate that of the criminal 
law, without elevating associations, without leaders or teachers, save a few 
rare exceptions. 

Under the old regime their masters were educated, and many of their 
masters, as the negroes saw it superficially, lived without work, while they 
were compelled to work. Is it any wonder, therefore, that the negro should 
have had a false idea of education, and followed it to his ruin in too many 
cases? Is it any wonder that work was associated in his mind with slavery, 
and, therefore, disgraceful; that idleness was associated with education and 



Work to Be Doink and How to Do It. 57 

wealth as embodied iu his former master, and, therefore, honorable? A race 
not trained to think would not find it hard to draw from these superficial facts 
the conclusion that the great blessing of education was freedom from work, 
that idleness was honorable, that work was dishonorable. The few among 
the negroes, therefore, who succeeded in acquiring a little knowledge first 
became at once a sort of aristocracy, ^and the temptation to these few to 
make their living by their wits out of the ignorant many of their race was 
too great for a race in its childhood to resist. Is it any wonder, then, that 
we had after the days of reconstruction a multitude of pretentious, half-taught, 
bigoted preachers and school-teachers constituting themselves leaders of 
their race and filling the negroes by example and precept with all sorts of 
false notions about education, character, life work, and citizenship? Their 
conception of their own importance was greatly magnified by the court paid 
to them as self-constituted leaders of their race, by political demagogues de- 
siring to ride into positions of prominence and profit upon negro votes. By 
the Constitutional Amendment we are happily rid of this danger. The 
negx'o's ideals were not much elevated by the example and teachings of our 
Northern neighbors who came among us as educational missionaries to him, 
but who were ignorant of the real social and industrial conditions of the 
South, and who were often prompted by honest but blind prejudice, and 
oftener, perhaps, by honest but tragic fanaticism. After the lapse of thirty 
years we are reaping the harvest of such sowing. Is it not time for us to 
have learned the lesson that it teaches? We must take charge of negro edu- 
cation and direct it along saner lines. We must no longer leave the blind to 
lead the blind. 

"We cannot answer effectively this prejudice against negro education, aris- 
ing from the results produced by causes largely attributable, perhaps, to 
revolutionized social, political and industrial conditions wrought by the tor- 
nado of civil war, save with a practical demonstration of the better results 
of a better education. All the evils of a reconstruction of society,- life and 
government upon a weak race unprepared for such changes, ushered into the 
new order of things with but few intelligent, wise, right-thinking leaders, 
without power of proper self-restraint or self-direction, have been laid by the 
demagogues, by the unthinking, and by some other men and women as honest 
and patriotic as any that breathe, at the door of partial education as the 
quickest, easiest and most plausible Solution of the unsatisfactory results. 
Too few stop to think what might have been the result if the new generation 
of negroes had been allowed to grow up in absolute ignorance under these 
changed conditions, with the rights and freedom of citizens of a republic 
without the restraint of the training and the association of educated masters, 
as under the old system. Too few stop to think that whatever of deteriora- 
tion there may have been in the new generation of negroes as compared with 
the old may be more attributable to a change in civilization and in the whole 
order of things than to the little learning that he has received. Too few stop 
to think of the danger and the unfairness of the sort of reasoning that com- 
pares the best of the old generation of negroes with the worst of the new, 
that compares the partly educated negro of the present generation with the 
illiterate negi-o of the old generation, who, though ignorant of books, had 
much knowledge of many useful industries and trades and better opportuni- 
ties of acquiring such knowledge, instead of comparing the literate negro of 



58 Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 

the new generation with the illiterate negro of the new generation, that 
ascribes all the faults found in the new generation to the smattering of learn- 
ing that they have received and all the virtues found in the old generation to 
their illiteracy. One is partly educated, the other was illiterate; therefore 
education is the cause of the faults of the one and illiteracy of the virtues of 
the other. The absui-dity of such logic ought to be manifest to the average 
man. Here are two men, one educated, the other ignorant. One becomes a 
murderer, for there have been educated murderers in all times; the other 
becomes a good citizen, for there have been ignorant good citizens in all times ; 
therefore education makes murderers and ignorance makes good citizens. 

"In the consideration of a great question like this mqn should look deeper 
than the mere surface facts and see the danger of drawing imiversal con- 
clusions from single facts and undertaking to settle the educational destiny 
of a whole race for all time by the experience of a mere quarter of a century 
under most unfavorable conditions. The old order has passed, never to 
return. We must face the future under the new order. Would it not be 
wise to ask and to seek to answer without prejudice or partiality these and 
similar questions : Are not the changes in the negro mostly attributable to the 
changes in the oi-der of things? According to the testimony of all the ages, 
has ignorance ever been found a remedy for anything? According to the 
testimony of all the ages, may not education of the right sort, properly directed 
by those who have right ideals and know how to direct it, prove a remedy 
for many of these undesirable changes in the negro incident largely to this 
unavoidable and radical change in his life, environment and .relations to those 
about him? Might not his condition and character have been infinitely worse 
and more brutal under the changed order of things without the little training 
that he has received from conscientious teachers here and there, even in the 
poor schools that have been opened to him, and without the little glimpses of a 
better life and the aspirations for it and the acquisition of a little power to 
reach out after it that he has obtained here and there even in these schools? 
These are questions to which conscientious men and women should give serious 
consideration before condemning and abandoning the experiment of the educa- 
tion of the negro. 

"It is my firm conviction, as I have said above, that we must demonstrate 
by a better sort of education for the negro, and a more effective sort, that it 
may be helpful to him and to us before we can hope to convince many of our 
people that education, even of the right sort, is a good thing for the negro. 
We cannot answer argument and prejudice much longer by theory and ap- 
peals to conscience. It is my conviction, also, that the best training and edu- 
cation for the masses of the negroes in the South is agricultural. It is, of 
coiu-se, absolutely essential for every human being to have first a mastery of 
the essentials of knowledge, such as will give him a reasonable degree of 
Intelligence. The negroes have not yet acquired this, nor would I preclude 
the few negroes that manifest an adaptedness to scholarship and learning 
and a power to acquire them from the opportunity to pursue the study of the 
higher branches of learning. I must express the conviction, however, that 
this class of negroes will be found to constitute but a small per cent of the 
race at present, and perhaps for generations to come. 

"I believe that farm life offers the safest environment for the negro, or, as 
for that matter, for any other race, in its primitive stage of progress and civ- 



Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 59 

ilization. Strange to say, however, the teudeucy of the negro is to tiock to 
the towns where the temptations to idleness and vice and dissipation of every 
sort are far more numerous than in the country, and are visually greater than 
negro weakness can stand. The health conditions, too, in the towns are worse. 
Scores are sometimes huddled together in small rooms and houses without 
regard to the laws of health or sex. It can but prove ruinous to the negro 
if he seeks town life before his I'ace has grown stronger in character and intel- 
lect and industry and in all the essentials of racial strength by the Antean 
touch of Mother Earth in the quiet country life on the farm. * 

'•There is greater demand on the farm for the negro in the South at present. 
It is the one open door for him, as I see it. Not only is there great demand 
for his services on the farms already under cultivation, but there are also 
vast territories of uncultivated lands, exceeding, perhaps, the cultivated ter- 
ritory, that invite his industry and offer ample compensation for intelligent 
cultivation and for increase in the wealth and pi'osperity of the State. If the 
negro can be trained and educated to occupy this field intelligently and con- 
tentedly, thus demonstrating that his education has fitted him for making 
better crops and more money for himself and his landlord, and has developed 
in him the power and the ambition gradually to acquire little holdings of his 
own and to help redeem from waste the great wealth of these thousands and 
hundreds of thousands of acres of unfilled lands, he will win the confidence, 
respect, support, and aid of Southern white men, because he will deserve them, 
and he will win a permanent place in Southern life because he w^ill have made 
himself indispensable to it. Unless he does this, the time is not far distant 
when Southern farmers will be compelled to import foreign white laborers, 
when even this safest door will be closed to the negro. 

"Since the consolidation of the State colored normal schools, under the 
supervision of the new Superintendent, we have already begun to develop 
in a small way, at the three colored normal schools, departments for industrial 
and agricultural training with a view to giving this training to the teachers 
of the race and instilling into them right ideals. We have been handicapped, 
however, in this work by the insutficiency of the appropriation for these 
schools and by lack of permanent plants for them ; but with the State appropri- 
ation for buildings and equipment granted by the General Assembly of 1907 we 
will soon have fair buildings and equipment, as will be seen from the report of 
the superintendent of these schools, printed elsewhere. I do not see why these 
State colored normal schools and the A. and M. College for the colored race at 
Greensboro might not be made the nuclei for eventually working out a success- 
ful plan of agricultural and industrial education for the negro race by training 
at these institutions teachers for this sort of education, and, finally, when the 
means can be found for it, establishing in the counties, especially the counties 
with large negro population, one or more schools for giving this sort of training 
to the negroes, making these schools a part of the same general system and 
placing them all under the same general management and supervision. It will, 
however, require time and money to work out this plan. 

"This question of negro education is, after all, not a question of whether 
the negro shall be educated or not, for it is impossible for any race to remain 
in this great republic in the twentieth century uneducated. The real ques- 
tion is, therefore, how he shall be educated and by whom it shall be done. 
If his education is not directed by us, others that do not understand our 



60 Work to Be Done and How to Do It. 

social structure, that are iguorant of the nature and needs of the negro and 
have false notions of his relation to the white race in the South, will take 
charge of it. Our safety, then, lies in taking charge of it ourselves, and direct- 
ing it along lines that shall be helpful to him and to us, and in harmony with 
our civilization and society and with his nature. 

"There is another phase of this problem of negro education worthy of the 
serious consideration of our people. It is manifest to me that if the negroes 
become convinced that they are to be deprived of their schools and of the 
opportunities of an education, most of the wisest and most self-respecting 
negroes will leave the State, and eventually there will be left here only the 
indolent, worthless and criminal part of the negro population. Already there 
has been considerable emigration of negroes from the State. There is -no surer 
way to drive the best of them from the State than by keeping up this continual 
agitation about withdrawing from them the meager educational opportunities 
that they now have. Their emigration in large numbers would result in a 
complication of the labor problem. Some of our Southern farms would be com- 
pelled to lie untenanted and unfilled. The experience of one district in Wilson 
County illustrates this. The County Board of Education found it, for various 
reasons, impossible to purchase a site for a negro schoolhouse. Before the year 
was out the board received several offers from farmers in the district to 
donate a site. Upon inquiry by the chairman of the board as to the reason of 
these generous offers, he was told that when it was learned that no site for the 
schoolhouse could be secured and that the negroes were to have no school in 
that district, at least one-third of the best negro tenants and laborers there 
moved into other districts where they could have the advantages of a school. 
This is a practical side of this question that our people would do well to con- 
sider. What happened in this district will happen in the entire State if we 
give the best negroes reasonable grounds to believe that their public school 
privileges are to be decreased or withdrawn. 



State Aid to Education. 



61 



STATE AID TO EDUCATION AND EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS, 

1907 AND 1909. 





1907. 


1909. 


Name. 


Annual 
Support. 


Improve- 
ments 
(2 years). 


Annual 
Support. 


Improve- 
ments 
(2 years). 


University, Chapel Hill .. . . _ 


$ 70,000 

70,000 

32,000 

46,000 

60,000 

10,000 

7,000 

6,000 

196,250 

3,750 

15,200 

1,200 

5,000 

45,000 


$ 50,000 
50,000 
63,000 

8,500 
23,200 

9,000 
14,000 

8,000 


$ 75,000 


s ^^9. nnn 


State Normal College, Greensboro 


75,000 52,000 


A. and M. College (white), Raleigh 


70,000 .■^fi.oon 


Deaf and Dumb School, Morganton. ... 


50,000 

65,000 

10,000 

7,000 

6,000 

221,250 


30,000 


Deaf, Dumb and Blind School, Raleigh 


30,000 


A. and M. College (colored), Greensboro 

CuUowhee Normal School . 


8.700 
14,000 


Appalachian Training School .. _ 


16,000 


Public schools . 




Rurallibraries .. 




3,750 
15,200 




Colored normal schools . _.,. . . 




90.000 


Croatan Normal School (Indian). _ 




1,200 .■?-.'ion 


East Carolina Teachers' Training School 

Public high schools 


15,000 


* 19, 000 
50,000 


50,000 










Total . 


567,400 


240,700 


668,400 


312,200 







*$13,000 for 1909 and $25,000 for 1910. 

This table shows an increase during the two years of $101,000 for the an- 
nual support of etlucation and an increase of $71,500 for permanent improve- 
ments in educational institutions. 



The following table shows in detail the condition of the State educational 
institutions at the close of this biennial period : 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS SUPPORTED BY THE STATE, 1910. 



Name. 



University of North Carolina 

Normal and Industrial College 

A. and M. College (white) 

School for Blind (white) 

School for Deaf and Blind (colored) 

School for Deaf and Dumb (white) 

A. and M. College (colored) 

CuUowhee Normal School 

Appalachian Training School 

FayetteviUe State Normal School (col- 
ored) 

Elizabeth City State Normal School (col- 
ored) 

Slater State Normal School (colored), 

Winston 

Croatan Normal School (Indian) 

East Carolina Teachers' Training School. 

Total 



o 



1789 
1892 
1889 
1845 
1868 
1891 
1891 
1888 
1903 

1877 

1891 

1895 
1885 
1907 



si 
o 

1) 



94 
63 
42 
21 
18 
28 
14 
10 
13 



12 

2 

12 






820 
613 
470 
215 
213 
326 
297 
265 
326 

295 

320 

443 
217 
172 



343 4,992 



State Aid 

for 
Support 
(Annual). 



75,000 
75,000 
70,000 

65,000 

50,000 

10,000 

7,000 

6,000 

3,897 

4,783 

6,520 

1,250 

25,000 



399,450 



Total 
Income. 



162,000 
111,000 
141,962 

65,000 

50,250 

19,900 

7,700 

6,000 

14,247 

12,290 

13,796 

1,250 

25,000 



630,395 



Value of 
Plant. 



798,000 
625,000 
350,000 
200,000 
100,000 
280,000 
127,575 
42,000 
50,000 

28,000 

19,000 

25,000 

4,600 

200,000 



2,849,175 



STATISTICAL RECORD OF TWO YEARS' PROGRESS. 



The following tables give concisely the educational facts as compiled for the 
biennial period 190S-'09 and 1909-'10: 

SCHOOL FUNDS AND SOURCES. 



Balance from 1908-'09 

Local t ax , 1909-' 10 

Local tax , 1908-'09 

Increase . 

Percentage of increase 

Loans, bonds, etc., 1909-'10 

Loans, bonds, etc., 1908-'09 

Increase 

County fund, 1909-' 10 

County fund, 190S-'09 

Increase 

Special State appropriations, elementary schools 

Special State appropriations, public high schools 

Private donations. State appropriations, etc., for libra 
ries, 1909-' 10 

Private donations. State appropriations, etc., forlibra- 
rie.=!, 1908-09 ... 

Increase 

Total available school fund , 1909-' 10 

Total available school fund, 1908-09 

Increase 

Percentage of increase 

Rural funds (not included in above), 1909-10 

Rural funds (not included in above), 1908-'09 

Increase 



Rural. 



$ 277,635.54 

296,914.63 

237,744.17 

59,170.46 

24.9 

66,775.00 

59,302.50 

7,472.50 

1,446,355.84 

1,477,933.72 

*31,577.88 

216,220.80 

48,350.00 

25,410.66 

30,462.41 

*5,011.75 

2,377,662.47 

2,325,863.12 

51,799.35 

2.2 

t65,971.32 

76,128.14 

*10,156.82 



City. 



$ 56,918.40 

580,885.28 

579,505.65 

1,379.63 

.24 

227,302.49 

160,768.46 

66,534.03 

307,806.42 

284,845.62 

22,960.80 



14.85 

*14.85 

1,172,912.59 

1,093,239.91 

79,672.68 

7.3 



North 
Carolina. 



$ 334,553.94 

877,799.91 

817,249.82 

60,550.09 

7.4 

294,077.49 

220,070,96 

74,006.53 

1,754,162.26 

1,762,779.34 

*8.617.08 

216,220.80 

48,350.00 

25,410.66 

30,477.26 

*5,066.60 

3,550,575.06 

3,419,103.03 

131,472.03 

3.7 

65,971.32 

76,128.14 

*10,156.82 



♦Decrease. tSee Supplement to Table I. 



Statistical Recokd of Two Years' Peogkess. 



63 



PER CAPITA AMOUNT RAISED FOR EACH CHILD. 



Total available fund, 1909-10 

Total available fund, 1908-'09 

Increase 

School population, 1909-10 

School population, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Available fund for each child 

Total funds raised for schools by taxation, 1909-'10- 
Total funds raised for schools by taxation, 1908-09. 

Increase 

Per capita raised by taxation for each child, 1909-'10. 
Per capita raised by taxation for each child, 1908-09. 

Increase 

Value of all taxable property 

Taxable property for each child, 1909-' 10 



Rural. 



$ 2,377,662.47 

2,325,863.12 

51,799.35 

605,672 

598,657 

7,015 

$ 3.92 

1,743,270.47 

1,715,677.89 

27,592.58 

2.88 

2.86 

.02 



City. 



$ 1,172,912.59 

1,093,239.91 

79,672.68 

129,496 

128,908 

588 

$ 9.05 

888,691.70 

864,351.27 

24,340.43 

6.80 

6.70 

.10 



North 
Carolina. 



$3,. 550, 575. 06 

3,419,103.03 

131,472.03 

735,168 

727,565 

7,603 

$ 4.82 

2,631,962.17 

2,580,029.16 

51,933.01 

3.58 

3.54 

.04 

593,387,413.00 

807.14 



AMOUNT RAISED BY TAXATION FOR EACH $100 TAXABLE PROPERTY 

FOR EACH INHABITANT IN 1900. 



Available fund for each child ! 



Per capita amount raised by taxation for each child of 
school age, 1909-' 10 



Rural. 



3.92 

2.88 



Taxable property for each child, 1909-'10 

Amount raised for each $100 taxable property, 1909-10- . 

Per capita amount raised (1909-10) for each inhabitant 
(census 1900) 



City. 



9.05 
6.80 



North 
Carolina. 



4.82 

3.58 

807.14 

.44 

1.39 



64 



Statistical Recokd of Two Years' Progress. 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES. 



Rural. 



City. 



North 
Carolina. 



Total expenditures, 1909-10 

Total expenditures, 1908-09 

Increase 

Teaching and supervision, 1909-' 10 

Teaching and supervision, 1908-09 

Increase 

Buildings and supplies, 1909-10 

Buildings and supplies, 1908-09 , 

Increase 

Administration, 1909-' 10 

Administration, 1908-09 

Increase 

Public high schools ^._. 

Loans repaid, interest, etc 

Balance on hand June 30, 1910 

Percentage for teaching and supervision, 1909-10 
Percentage for buildings and supplies, 1909-'10._. 
Percentage for administration, 1909-10 

♦Decrease. 



2,126,695.50 

2,029,023.77 

97,671.73 

1,433,650.78 

1,336,866.08 

96,784.70 

424,442.62 

434,818.98 

*10,376.36 

107.037.59 

92,499.40 

14,538.19 

123,368.39 

51,639.86 

250,691.97 

67.4 

19.1 

.5 



1,052,255.00 

1,040,236.59 

12,018.41 

688,954.98 

638,070.52 

50,884.46 

243,253.30 

277,020.98 

*33,767.68 

17,199.67 

23,160.84 

*5,961.17 



102,847.05 
121,032.59 
65.5 
23.1 
1.6 



83,178,950.50 

3,069,260.36 

109,690.14 

2,122,605.76 

1,974,936.60 

147,669.16 

667,695.92 

711,839.96 

*44.144.04 

124,237 26 

115,660.24 

8.577.02 

123,368.39 

154,486.91 

371,724.56 

67.1 

21.0 

3.9 



Statistical Record of Two Years' Progress. 



65 



SPENT FOR TEACHING AND SUPERVISION. 



» 
For supervision (superintendents) , 1909-' 10 

For supervision (superintendents) , 1908-09 

Increase 

Wtiite teachers, 1909-' 10 

Wliite teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

Colored teachers, 1909-' 10 

Colored teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

Total spent for teaching and supervision, 1909-10 

Total spent for teaching and supervision, 1908-09 

Increase 

Percentage spent for teaching and supervision, 1909-'10 
Percentage spent for teaching and supervision, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Percentage spent for supervision alone, 1909-10 -.. 

Percentage spent for supervision alone, 1908-09 

Increase 

Average salary of superintendents, 1909-10 

Average salary of superintendents, 1908-'09 

Increase 

♦Decrease. 



Rural. 



$ 78,071.75 
71,910.32 
6,161.43 
1,126,059.83 
1,037,442.78 
88,617.05 
229,519.20 
227,512.98 
2,006.22 
1,433,650.78 
1,336,866.08 
96,784.70 
67.4 
65.9 
1.5 
3.7 
3.5 
.2 
796.65 
733.77 
62.88 



City. 



93,380.74 
94,993.57 
*1,612.83 
494,593.13 
449,555.48 
45,037.65 
100,981.11 
93,521.47 
7,459.64 
688,954.98 
638,070.52 
50,884.41 
65.5 
61.3 
4.2 
8.5 
9.1 
*.2 
1,026.16 
1,091.88 
*65.72 



North 
Carolina. 



$ 171,452.49 
166,903.89 
4,548.60 
1,620,652.96 
1,486,998.26 
133,654.70 
330,500.31 
321,034.45 
9,465.86 
2,122,605.76 
1,974,936.60 
147,669.16 
67.1 
64.3 
2.8 
5.4 
5.4 

907.16 

902.18 

4.98 



Part 1—5 



66 



Statistical Record of Two Years' Progress. 



SPENT FOR BUILDING AND SUPPLIES. 



Rural. 



Fuel and janitors, 1909-10 

Fuel and janitors, 1908-09 

Increase 

Furniture, 1909-' 10 

Furniture, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Libraries, 1909-'10 1 

Libraries, 1908-09 

Increase 

Supplies, 1909-10 

Supplies, 1908-09 

Increase 

Houses (wlaite), 1909-10 

Houses (white), 1908-09 

Increase 

Houses (colored), 1909-10 

Houses (colored), 1908-09 

Increase 

Insurance and rent, 1909-10 

Insurance and rent , 1908-09 

Increase 

Interest, loan fund, etc., 1909-10 - . 

Interest, loan fund, etc., 1908-09 

Increase 

Total for buildings and supplies, 1909-10 

Total for buildings and supplies, 1908-09 

Increase 

Percentage for buildings and supplies, 1909-10 
Percentage for buildings and supplies, 1908-09 

Increase 



$ 32,405.50 

27,744.17 

4,661.33 

45,834.91 

* 46,119.07 

*284,16 

10,096.43 

12,662.84 

*1,906.67 

11,403.93 

8,562.02 

2,841.91 

228,123.85 

254,590.89 

*26,467.04 

26,100.52 

25,056.90 

1,043.62 

9,382.70 

8,536.76 

845.94 

61,094.78 

51,546.33 

9,548.45 

424,442.62 

434,818.98 

*10,376.36 

19.9 ■ 

21.4 

*1.5 



City. 



$ 53,753.30 

54,997.03 

*1,243.73 

30,905.69 

18,824.18 

12,081.51 

1,985.87 

1,326.13 

659.74 

22,399.15 

19,330.18 

3,668.97 

75,928.59 

134,875.60 

*58,947.01 

16,789.72 

12,187.19 

4,602.53 

9,722.93 

7,136.63 

2,586.30 

31,768.05 

28,344.04 

3,424.01 

243,253 30 

277.020.98 

*33,767.68 

23.1 

26.6 

*3.5 



North 
CaroUna. 



86,158.80 

82,741.20 

3,417.60 

76,740.60 

64,943.25 

11,797.35 

12,082.30 

13,988.97 

*1,906.67 

33,803 08 

27,892.20 

5,910.88 

304,052.44 

389,466.49 

*85,414.05 

42,890.24 

37,244.09 

5,646.15 

19,105.63 

15,673.39 

3,432.24 

92,862.83 

79,890.37 

12,972.46 

667,695.92 

711,839.96 

*44, 144.04 

21.0 

23.2 

*2.2 



♦Decrease. 



Statistical Record of Two Years' Progress. 



67 



SPENT FOR ADMINISTRATION, ETC. 



Treasurer, 1909-'10 

Treasurer, 1908-09 

Increase 

Board of Education, 1909-10 

Board of Education, 190S-'09 

Increase 

Taking census and committeemen, 1909-10.. 
Taking census and committeemen, 1908-09- . 

Increase 

Other expenses, 1909-10 

Other expenses, 1908-09 

Increase 

Total for administration, 1909-10 

Total for administration, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Percentage spent for administration, 1909-10 
Percentage spent for administration, 1908-09 

Increase 

♦Decrease. 



Rural. 



$ 41,601.49 

40,347.79 

1.253.70 

19,061.56 

19,342.18 

*2S0.62 

11,924,08 

10,760.22 

1,163.86 

34,450.54 

22,049.21 

12,401.33 

107,037.67 

92,499.40 

14,538.27 

5n0 

4.6 

.4 



City. 


5,959.50 


6,834.50 


*875.00 


81.32 


60.88 


20.44 


2,037.56 


1,211.83 


825.73 


9,121.29 


15,053.63 


5,932.34 


17,199.67 


23,160,84 


*5,961.17 


1.6 


2.2 


*.6 



North 
Carolina. 



$ 47,560.99 

47,182.29 

378.70 

19,142.88 

19.403.06 

*260.18 

13,961.64 

11,972.05 

1,989.59 

43,571.83 

37,102.84 

6,468.99 

124,237.34 

115,660.24 

8,577.10 

3.9 

3.8 

.1 



68 



Statistical Record of Two Yeaks' Progress. 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE BY COUNTIES AND TOWNS. 



Rural. 



Total school population, 1909-' 10 

Total school population, 1908-09 

Increase ■-- 

White school population, 1909-10 

White school population, 1908-09 

Increase 

Colored school population, 1909-' 10 

Colored school population, 1908-09 

Increase j- 

Total enrollment, 1909-10 

Total enrollment, 1908-09 

Increase 

White enrollment, 1909-10 

White enrollment, 1908-09 

Increase 

Colored enrollment, 1909-10 

Colored enrollment, 1908-09 

Increase 

Total average daily attendance, 1909-' 10 

Total average daily attendance, 1908-'09 

Increase 

White average daily attendance, 1909-10 

White average daily attendance, 1908-09 

Increase 

Colored average daily attendance, 1909-10 

Colored average daily attendance, 1908-09 

Increase 

Percentage of school population enrolled, 1909-10 

Percentage of school population enrolled, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Percentage of white school population enrolled, 1909-'10- 
Percentage of white school population enrolled, 1908-09. 

Increase 



Percentage of colored school population enrolled, 

1909-'10. 
Percentage of colored school population enrolled, 

1908-09. 

Increase 



Percentage of enrollment in average daily attendance, 

1909-10. 
Percentage of enrollment in average daily attendance, 

1908-09. 

Increase 



605,672 

598,657 

7,015 

416,251 

410,659 

5,592 

189,421 

187,998 

1,433 

442,044 

442,935 

*891 

306,859 

307,908 

*1,049 

135,185 

135,027 

158 

277,109 

280,794 

*3,685 

196,527 

201,288 

*4,761 

80,582 

79,506 

1,076 

72.9 

73.9 

*1.0 

73.7 

74.9 

*1.2 

71.4 

71.8 
* 4 

62.7 

63.3 

*.6 



City. 


North 
Carolina. 


129,496 


735,168 


128,908 


727,565 


588 


7,603 


80,826 


497,077 


80,051 


490,710 


775 


6,367 


48,670 


238,091 


48,857 


236,855 


*187 


1,236 


78,360 


520,404 


78,267 


521,202 


93 


*798 


53,262 


360,121 


52,867 


360,775 


395 


*654 


25,098 


160,283 


25,400 


160,427 


*302 


*144 


54,226 


331,335 


55,175 


335,969 


*949 


*4,634 


39,345 


235,872 


39,591 


240,879 


*246 


*5,007 


14,881 


95,463 


15,584 


95,090 


*703 


373 


60.5 


70.8 


60.7 


71.5 


*.2 


*.7 


65.9 


72.4 


66.0 


73.3 


*.l 


*.9 


51.6 


67.3 


51.9 


67.7 


*.3 


* 4 


69.2 


63.7 


70.4 


04.4 


*1.2 


*.7 



Statistical Record of Two Years' Progress. 



69 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE— Continued. 





Rural. 


City. 


North 
Carolina. 


Percentage of white enrollment in average daily attend- 
ance, 1909-10. 

Percentage of white enrollment in average daily attend- 
ance, 1908-09. 

Increase - - 


64.0 
65.3 
*1.3 
59.6 

58.8 
.8 


73.9 
74.8 
*.9 
59.3 
61.3 
*2.0 


65.5 
06.7 
*1.2 


Percentage of colored enrollment in average daily at- 
tendance, 1909-10. 

Percentage of colored enrollment in average daily at- 
tendance, 1908-09. 

Increase , 


59.5 

59.2 

.3 







I' Decrease. 



SALARIES AND TERM. 



Total number of teachers, 1909-10 

Total number of teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

White teachers, 1909-10 

White teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

Colored teachers, 1909-10 

Colored teachers, 1908-09 . . 

Increase 

Amount paid all teachers, 1909-' 10 

Amount paid all teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

Amount paid white teachers, 1909-'10 

Amount paid white teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

Amount paid colored teachers, 1909-'10 . . 

Amount paid colored teachers, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Average annual amount paid each teacher, 1909-10 
Average annual amount paid each teacher, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Average annual amount paid each white teacher, 

1909-10. 
Average annual amount paid each white teacher, 

1908-'09. 

Increase 



Rural. 



9,440 

9,370 

70 

7,047 

6,926 

121 

2,393 

2,444 

*51 

1,355,579.03 

1,264,955.76 

90,623.27 

1,126,059.83 

1,037,442.78 

88,617.05 

229,519.20 

227,512.98 

2,006.22 

143. 60 

135.00 

8.60 

159.79 

149.81 

9.98 



City. 



1,722 

1,587 

135 

1,322 

1,203 

119 

400 

384 

16 

595,574.24 

543,076.95 

52,497.29 

494,593.18 

449,555.48 

45,037.65 

100,981.11 

93,521.47 

7,459.64 

345.86 

342.07 

3.79 

374.12 

373.69 

.43 



North 
Carolina. 



11,162 

10,957 

205 

8,369 

8,129 

240 

2,793 

2,828 

*35 

$1,951,153.27 

1,808,032.71 

143,120.56 

1,620,652.96 

1,486,998.26 

133,664.70 

330,500.31 

321,034.45 

9,465.86 

174.80 

165.02 

9.78 

193.65 

182.93 

10.72 



70 



Statistical Record of Two Years' Progress. 



SALARIES AND TERM — Continued 








Rural. 


City. 


North 
Carolina. 


Average annual amount paid each colored teacher, 

1909-10. 
Average annual amount paid each colored teacher, 

1908-09. 

Increase . .- .. 


$ 95.91 
93.09 
2.82 
89.9 
89.6 
.3 
92.7 
92,7 
.0 
81.7 
81.2 
.5 
$ 31.94 
30.12 
1.82 
34.47 
32.32 
2.15 
23 48 
22.92 
.56 


$ 252.45 
240.94 
11.51 
172.8 
172.3 
.5 
175.2 
175.8 
*.6 
164.8 
161.3 
3.5 
$ 40.03 
39.82 
.21 
42.72 
42.50 
.22 
30.64 
29.87 
.77 


S 118.33 
113.52 

4.81 


Average term of all schools (in days) , 1909-' 10 

Average term of all schools (in days), 1908-09 

Increase 


101.9 

101.3 

.6 


Average term of white schools (in days), 1909-'10_- . 

Average term of white schools (in days), 1908-'09-._ 

Increase - ..--_- 


104.6 

105.0 

* 4 


Average term of colored schools (in days), 1909-'10_ _ 
Average term of colored schools (in days), 1908-09 . . 
Increase - 


93.7 

91.9 

1.8 


Average monthly salary paid all teachers, 1909-'10__ 
Average monthly salary paid all teachers, 1908-09. _ 


f 34.30 

32.58 

1.72 


Average monthly salary paid white teachers, 1909-10 
Average monthly salary paid white teachers, 1908-09 
Increase 


37.02 
34.80 

2.22 


Average monthly salary paid coldred teachers, 

1909-10. 
Average monthly salary paid colored teachers, 

1908-'09. 


25.26 

24.70 

.56 







♦Decrease. 



Statistical Kecord of Two Years' Progress. 



71 



SCHOOL PROPERTY. 



Total value all school property, 1909-10- 

Total value all school property, 1908-09 

Increase 

Value white school property, 1909-10 

Value white school property, 1908-09 

Increase _. 

Value colored school property, 1909-10 

Value colored school property, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Total number schoolhouses, 1909-' 10 

Total number schoolhouses, 1908-09 

Increase _. 

Number white schoolhouses, 1909-10 

Number white schoolhouses, 1908-09 

Increase 

Number colored schoolhouses, 1909-' 10 

Number colored schoolhouses, 1908-09 

Increase 

Average value each schoolhouse, 1909-10 

Average value each schoolhouse, 1908-09 

Increase 

Average value each schoolhouse (white), 1909-10-- 
Average value each schoolhouse (white), 1908-09.- 

Increase 

Average value each schoolhouse (colored), 1909-10. 
Average value each schoolhouse (colored), 1908-09. 

Increase 



Rural. 



$3,094,416.00 

2,846,998.00 

247,418.00 

2,706,911.00 

2,487,614.00 

219,297.00 

387,505.00 

359,384.00 

28,121.00 

7,350 

7,401 

*51 

5,156 

5,189 

*33 

2,194 

2,212 

*18 

$ 421.00 

384.00 

37.00 

525.00 

479.00 

154.00 

176.00 

162.00 

14.00 



City. 



$2,768,553.00 

2,588,791.00 

179,762.00 

2,478,610.00 

2,303,926.00 

174,684.00 

289,943.00 

284,865.00 

5,078.00 

259 

269 

*10 

169 

173 

*4 

90 

96 

*6 

$ 10,689.33 

9,623.00 

1,066.33 

14,666.00 

13,317.00 

1,349.00 

3,221.00 

2,965.00 

256.00 



North 
CaroUna. 



$5,862,969.00 

5,435,789.00 

427,180.00 

5,185,521.00 

4,791,540.00 

493,981.00 

677,448.00 

644,249.00 

33,199.00 

7.609 

7,670 

*61 

5,325 

5,362 

*37 

2,284 

2,308 

*24 

$ 770.53 

708.00 

62.53 

973.00 

893.00 

80.00 

296.00 

279.00 

17.00 



♦Decrease. 



72 



Statistical Eecord of Two Years' Progress. 



LOG SCHOOLHOUSES, DISTRICTS, AND DISTRICTS WITHOUT HOUSES. 



1908-09. 



Number of school districts 

White 

Colored 

Number of log schoolhouses 

White 

Colored 

Number of districts having no house- 
White 

Colored 



7,670 
5,356 
2,314 
283 
102 
181 
345 
207 
138 



1909-10. 



7,679 

5,373 

2,306 

263 

94 

169 

325 

204 

121 



Decrease. 



*9 
•17 

8 
20 

8 
12 
20 

3 
17 



♦Increase. 



NUMBER OF SCHOOLS HAVING TWO OR MORE TEACHERS, ETC. 



White. 



Number of rural white schools 

Rural white school population 

Land area of State 

Average area covered by each rural school 

School population to each rural school 

Number of schools having only one teacher 

Number of schools having two or more teachers. 



Number of schools in which some high-school subjects 
are taught. 



1908-'09. 



5,-371 

410,659 

48,580 

9.0 

76 

4,120 

1,251 

1,013 



1909-10. 



5,373 

416,251 

48,580 

9.0 

77 

4,018 

1,355 

1,041 



Increase. 



2 
5,592 



1 

*102 
104 

28 



Colored. 


1908-09. 


1909-10. 


Increase. 


Number of colored rural schools _ _ - 


2,280 

187,998 

48,580 

21.3 

82 

2,088 

192 

93 


2,272 

189,421 

48,580 

21.3 

83 

2,085 

187 

57 


*8 


Colored rural school population . - 


*577 


Tjand area of State 




Average area covered by each rural school 




School population to each school 


1 


Number of schools having only one teacher 


*3 


Number of schools having two or more teachers 

Number of schools in wl^ich some high-school subjects 
are taught. 


*5 
*36 



♦Decrease. 



Statistical Eecord of Two Years' Progress, 



73 



NUMBER AND SEX OF TEACHERS EMPLOYED. 



Total number teachers employed, 1909-10 
Total number teachers employed, 1908-09 

Increase 

White teachers, 1909-10 

White teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

Colored teachers, 1909-' 10 

Colored teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

White men employed, 1909-10 

White men employed, 1908-09 

Increase 

White women employed, 1909-10 --. 

White women employed, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Colored men employed, 1909-10 

Colored men employed, 1908-09 

Increase 

Colored women employed, 1909-10 

Colored women employed, 1908-09 

Increase 

♦Decrease. 



Rural. 



9,513 

9,370 

143 

7,113 

6,926 

187 

2,400 

2,444 

*44 

2,137 

2,167 

*30 

4,976 

4,759 

217 

766 

833 

*67 

1,634 

1,611 

23 



City. 



1,703 

1,587 

116 

1,309 

1,203 

106 

394 

384 

10 

180 

141 

39 

1,129 

1,062 

67 

102 

103 

*1 

292 

281 

11 



North 
Carolina. 



11,216 

10,957 

259 

8,422 

8,129 

293 

2,794 

2,828 

*34 

2,317 

2,308 

9 

6,105 

5,821 

284 

868 

936 

,*68 

1,926 

1,892 

34 



74 



Statistical Recoed of Two Years' Progress. 



SCHOLARSHIP OF WHITE TEACHERS. 



Total white teachers, 1909-' 10 

Total white teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

First grade, 1909-'10 

First grade, 1908-09 

Increase 

Second grade, 1909-10 -. 

Second grade, 1908-09 

Increase 

Third grade, 1909-'10,-. 

Third grade, 1908-09 

Increase 

Number having normal training, 1909-10 

Number having normal training, 1908-09 

Increase . 

Number having four years' experience, 1909-10 

Number having four years' experience, 1908-09 

Increase 

Number holding college diploma, 1909-10 

Number holding college diploma, 1908-09 

Increase 

Number teachers employed in local-tax districts 

1909-'10. 
Number teachers employed in local-tax districts 

1908-09. 

Increase 



Rural. 



7,113 

6,926 

187 

5,530 

5,355 

175 

1,500 

1,458 

42 

71 

113 

*42 

1,986 

1,833 

153 

3,129 

2,977 

152 

982 

927 

55 

1,739 

1,436 

303 



City. 



1,309 

1,203 

106 



729 
734 

*5 
932 
793 
139 
737 
682 

55 



North 
Carolina. 



8,422 
8.129 

293 
5,530 
5 , 355 

175 

1,500 

1,458 

42 

71 

113 

*42 
2,715 
2,567 

148 
4,061 
3,770 

291 
1,719 
1,609 

110 
1,739 
1,436 

303 



♦Decrease. 



Statistical Record of Two Years' Progress. 



75 



SCHOLARSHIP OF COLORED TEACHERS. 



Total number colored teachers employed, 1909-10. 
Total number colored teachers employed, 1908-09 . 

Increase 

First grade, 1909-10 

First grade, 1908-'O9 

Increase 

Second grade, 1909-10 

Second grade, 1908-09 

Increase 

Third grade, 1909-10---: 

Third grade, 1908-09 

Increase -. 

Number having normal training, 1909- 10 

Number having normal training, 1908-09 

Increase 

Number having four years' experience, 1909-']0 

Number having four years' experience, 1908-09 

Increase 

Number having college diploma , 1909-' 10 

Number having college diploma, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Number teachers employed in local-tax districts. . 



Rural. 



2,400 

2,444 

*44 

748 

757 

*9 

1,608 

1,635 

*27 

42 

52 

*10 

956 

1,104 

*148 

1,435 

1,394 

41 

270 

274 

*4 



City. 



394 

384 

10 



254 
231 

23 
309 
293 

16 
149 
155 

*6 



North 
Carolina. 



2,794 

2,828 

*34 

748 

757 

*9 

1,608 

1,635 

*27 

42 

52 

*10 

1,210 

1,335 

*125 

1,744 

1,687 

57 

419 

429 

*10 



♦Decrease. 



76 



Statistical Eecord of Two Years^ Progress. 



FURNITURE OF RURAL SCHOOLHOUSES. 





White. 


Colored. 


North 
Carolina. 


Number of rural schoolhouses-- 


5,223 

2,022 

2,428 

528 

38.7 

46.4 

10.1 


2,197 

148 

1,270 

672 

6.7 

57.8 

30.5 


7,420 


Furnished with patent desks. 


2,170 


Furni.shed with home-made desks . . _ 


3,698 


Furnished with benches . . 


1,200 


Percentage furnished with patent desks. - . 


29.2 


Percentage furnished with liome-made deslis . 


49.8 


Percentage furnished with benches . 


16 1 







NEW RURAL SCHOOLHOUSES BUILT AND THEIR COST. 



Total new schoolhouses built , 1909-' 10 

Total new schoolhouses built , 1908-09 

Total for two years 

Total cost of new schoolhouses built, 1909-10 

Total cost of new schoolhouses built, 1908-09 

Decrease 

Average cost of new rural schoolhouses built, 1909-10. 
Average cost of new rural schoolhouses built, 1908-09 _ 

Decrease 

Total cost of repairs 



White. 



280 

284 
564 



Colored. 



89 

72 

161 



North 
Carolina. 



369 
356 
725 

239,160.58 

272,376.00 

66.784.38 

648.00 

765.00 

117.00 

44.338.72 



Statistical Record of Two Years' Progress. 



77 



REPORT OF LOAN FUND. 



Total amount loaned since 1903, when fund was created 

Number of counties aided 

Number of districts aided 

Number of children in districts aided 

Number of new houses built with this fund 

Value of the new houses built 

Value of houses replaced 

Total amount of loans from June 30, 1908, to June 30, 1910 

Total number of counties receiving loans from June 30, 1908, to June 30, 1910 



$ 523,280.50 

89 

1 , 10!) 

159,175 

995 

$1,265,788.00 

158,601.00 

122,000.00 

65 



LOCAL-TAX DISTRICTS. 



Total number of districts voted during this biennial period 

Total number districts to June 30, 1908 

Total number districts to June 30, 1910 



288 
707 



995 



78 



Statistical Eecord of Two Years' Progress. 



REPORT OF RURAL LIBRARIES. 



Total number original libraries to June 30, 1910 

Total number supplemental libraries to June 30, 1910 

Total number of original libraries established from June 30, 1908, to June 30, 1910 
Total number supplemental June 30, 1908, to June 30, 1910 



2,420 

428 

.528 

76 



CROATAN INDIANS. 

The report of the Superintendent of Robeson County for 1909-1910 shows 
the following facts as to the Croatan Indian schools of that county : 



Croatan children of school age 

Croatan children enrolled in schools. 
Croatan children in daily attendance 

Number of teachers 

Number of schools 

Number of school districts 

Average term (days) 

Value school property 



1,976 

1,594 

936 

18 

22 

24 

82 

4,555 



Statistical Record of Two Years' Progress. 



79 



RURAL PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— NU MBER SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, 
ENROLLMENT, AND AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE. 



Number schools established 

Number teachers, 1910 - 

Male 

Female - 

Enrollment, 1909-' 10 

Males 

Females 

Enrollment, 1908-09 

Males 

Females 

Total enrollment, 1908-09 and 1909-10 

Average daily attendance, 1909-' 10 

Males 

Females 

Average daily attendance, 1908-09 

Males 

Females 

Total average daily attendance, 1908-09 and 1909-10 



170 
259 
168 
91 

,775 
2,764 
3,011 

,282 
2,418 
2,864 

,057 

,145 
1 ,887 
2,258 

,787 
1,698 
2,089 

,932 



80 



Statistical Record of Two Years' Progress. 



RURAL PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— RECEI PTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Receipts. 

From local taxation, 1909-10 

From local taxation, 1908-09 

Two years 

From private donations, 1909-' 10 

From private donations, 1908-09 

Two years 

From county apportionments, 1909-10 

From county apportionments, 1908-09 

Two years 

From State appropriation, 1909-10 

From State appropriation, 1908-09 

Two years 

Total receipts, 1908-09 and 1909-'10* 

Expenditures. 

For principals' salaries, 1909-' 10 

For principals' salaries, 1908-09 

Two years 

For salaries, assistant teachers, 1909-10 

For salaries, assistant teachers, 1908-09 

Two years 

For fuel, janitors and incidentals, 1909-10 

For fuel, janitors and incidentals, 1908-09 

Two years 

Total expenditures, 1908-09 and 1909-10 



40.446.86 
34,551.86 
74,998.75 
8,558.72 
9,316.76 
17,875.48 
30,908.24 
27,903.81 
58,812.05 
49,025.00 
45,369.99 
94,394.99 



246,081.27 

109,878.52 

98.187.59 

208.066.11 

13,542.75 

11,897.64 

25,440.39 

3,633.61 

2,900 40 

6,534.01 



240,040.51 



♦Leaving out of account all balances. 







y. 

D 

o 
o 

H 
M 
O 



a: 

o 



;-< 

o 

m 

o 
o 

o 



K 
O 



PART II. 



STATISTICS 1908-1909. 
STATISTICS 1909-1910. 



Part II— 1 



A. RECEIPTS FOR SCHOOLS. 



TABLE I. SCHOOL FUNDS AND SOURCES, 1908-'09. 

This table shows the total school fund of each county and of each separate 
town or city school system for the scholastic year 190S-'00, and the sources of 
the same. 

Summary of Table I and Comparison with IPOT-'OS. 



Balance from 1907-'08 

Local tax, 1908-'09 

Local tax, 1907-08 

Increase 

Percentage of increase 

Loans, bonds, etc., 1908-09 

Loans, bonds, etc., 1907-08 

Increase 

County fund, 1908-09 L 

County fund, 1907-08 

Increase 

Special State appropriations, elementary schools 
Special State appropriations, public high schools. 



Rural. 



City. 



Private donations, State appropriations, etc., for 
libraries, 1908-09 

Private donations. State appropriations, etc., for 
libraries, 1907-'08 



Increase 

Total available school fund, 1908-09 

Total available school fund, 1907-08 

Increase : 

Percentage of increase 

Private donations (not included in above), 1908-'09t 

Private donations (not included in above), 1907-08 

Increase 



286,012.23 

237,744.17 

139,723.30 

98,020.87 

70.8 

59,302.50 

100,534.00 

*41,231.50 

,477,933.72 

,391,236.65 

86,697.07 

189,028.10 

45,369.99 

30,462.41 

21,663.61 

8,798.80 

,325.863.12 

160,936.36 

164,926.76 

7.6 

76,128.14 

77,860.00 

*1,731.86 



$ 68,105.33 

579,505.65 

511,016.10 

68,489.55 

13.4 

160,768.46 

208,018.56 

*47,250.10 

284,845.62 

285,033.45 

*187.83 



North 
Carolina. 



I 354,117.56 

817,249.82 

650,739.40 

166,510.42 

25.5 

220,070.96 

308,552.56 

*88,481.60 

1,762,779.34 

1,676,270.10 

86,509.24 

189,028.10 

45,369.99 



14.85 ' 30,487.26 

25,243.50 46,907.11 

*25,228.65 *16,419.85 

1,093,239.91 I 3,419,103.03 

1,133,295.34 3,294,231.70 

*40,0.55.43 124,870.33 

*3.5 I 3.7 

76,128.14 

77,860.00 

; *1,731.86 



♦Decrease. fSee Supplement to Table I. 



6 



School Fund, 1908-'09. 



Table I. School Fund and Sources — Continued. 



Balance 
1907-'0S. 



County 

Fund, 

18c. Tax, 

etc. 



Local 

Taxes, 

etc. 



State 

First 

$100,000. 



State 
Second 
$100,000. 



State 

for 

Public 

High 



Bonds, 
Loan 
Fund, 
Bor- 
rowed 



Schools.! Money, 
etc. 



Li- 
braries, 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. 



Total 
Fund. 



Alamance.. -$ 3,701.37$ 26,450.99 $28,604.23 $1,282.75$ $ 750.00$ 3,185.00$3,081.67$ 



2,184.64 

1,496.08 

*166.89 

20.65 



Rural 

Burlington 

Graham 

Haw River 

Mebane 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Rural 

Wadesboro 

Ashe 

Beaufort 

Rural 

Washington. - 

Belhaven 

Bertie 

Rural 

Aulander 

Windsor 

Bladen 2,296.34! 

Brunswick 1,672.20! 

I 
Buncombe i 134.83 

Rural I 134.83' 

Asheville 1 *8,.596.02: 



3,077.42 

309.11 

7,720.37 

3,424.42 

4,295.95 

1,334.11 

7,123.25; 

6,434.09, 

689.16 

* 142. 63 

5,270.96 

5,221.77 

49.19 



3.51 
3.51 



Burke 

Rural 

Morganton 

Cabarrus 3,716.84 



Rural 

Concord.. 
Caldwell. . . 

Rural 

Lenoir 

Granite.. 
Rhodhiss- 



3,527.38 
189. 46| 
442. 2S 
224.76 
*57.68j 
202. 60| 
14.89i 



17,773.83 15,661.321 1,282.751 750.00 500.00 3,081.67 

3,500.00 6,164.54... 2,000.00 

2,922.00 3,635.13 ' L 

! i 

1,363.90 1,250.00 ; ...' 685.00 

891.26 1,893.24' 

2,643.861 250.00 

2,316.42 250.00 250.00 

750.00 2,525.00 



7,220.71 
4,468.03 



434.63 



564.35 
430.92 



14,896.38, 4,068.93 1,161.07 

13,162.97! 747. 97j 1,161.07 

1,733.41, 3,320.96.... 

9,790.77| 522.11 1,084.08 2,643.08 

22,946.96' 12,459.29 1,241.55| 

18,146.96; 1,276.40' 1,241.55; 

3,600.00 8,820.19 



320 00 
1,275.00 
750.00 2,525.00 1,275.00 



1,200.00 

18,436.48 

17,296.48 

350.00 

790.00 



14,333.97' 3,343.32 
8,505.83! 799.60 



2,362.701 

8,330.89j 1,066.48 

1,803.14 1,066.481 

1 

1.750.811 

4,776.941 i 

886.66; 3,182.61 
583.63' 2,139.42' 



500.00 140. OOj 

450.00 3,000.00; 352.58, 

I I I 

450.00 1,000.001 352.58, 

I 2,000.001 



500.00 
500. OOi 



278.00 
278. 00! 



500.00 



375.00 



176:90 



50,565.66' 56,193.58! 2,271.701.... .1 750.00 6,702.831 163.921 



38,101.24 
12,464.42 



7,478. 46i 2, 271. 70; 
48,715.121. 



12,726.52 5,821.511 
12,005.52 



721.00 5,821.51 



750. OOi 1,400. OOj 163.92; 

5,302.83' j 

1,700.00' 40.001 

40.00 

1,700,00 I 

2,000.00 365.00 

J 365.00; 

2,000.00' I 

15,564.451 8,455.93i 926.76 941.56 250.00 2,100.00 27.57' 

12,864.45.. ...j 926.76' 941.56' 250.00' _J 27.57^ 

1,450.00' 7,343.38' ....; '.... I 1,900.00.. 

650.00 tsoo.oo J. .! .1 ' 

i I I I 
600.00! 312. 55i I I... I 200.00 



19,713.48 

14,683.48 

5,030.00 



11,142.46 
2,471.94 

8,670.52 



1,199.49;. 
1,199.49'. 



250,00 
250.00 



67,056.01 
41,234.21 
13,160 62 

6,557.13 

3,319.55 

2,784.50 
14,190.97 

8,344.48 
32,396.75 
23,046.43 

9,350.32 
16,014.15 
47,573.63 
28,901.58 
15,109.35 

3,562.70 
33,882.81 
26,165.87 

2,150.00 

5,566.94 
24,719.80 
14,075.68 
116,782.52 
50,300.15 
66,482.37 
20,291.54 
12,049.03 

8,242.51 
38,387.27 
22,497.29 
15,889.98 
28,708.52 
15,235.10 
10,693.38 
tl,652.60 

1,127.44 



♦Deficit. 



tApproximated. JApportionnient of $905.38 received after fiscal year closed. 



School Fund, 1908-'09. 



Table I. School Fund and Sources — Continued. 



Balance, 
1907-08. 



County 

Fund, 

18c. Tax, 

etc. 



Local State ; State 
Taxes, First Second 
etc. $100,000. $100,000. 



State 

for 

Public 

High 



Bonds, 
Loan 
Fund, 
Bor- 
rowed 



Schools. I Money, 
etc. 



Li- 
braries, 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. 



Total 
Fund. 



Camden $ *265.87$ 5,331.03$ 1,733.05!$ 283.65$ $ 250.00$ $ 60.00$ 



Carteret 4,446.79 

Caswell ' 735.46 

Catawba 1,709.76; 

Rural i 736. 5ll 

Hickory j 168. 75| 

Newton 804. 50] 

Chatham ' 1,395. 38, 

Cherokee _ 3,080.92; 

Rural ; 1,813.76| 

Andrews 



6,442.75 252.23, 569.36' 2,232.85 500.00' 2,750.00: 

' ■ I ' 

9,072.68 674.00 1,899.36 

18,993.68 9,940.59' l,371.2l' 1,042.56 500.00 



Murphy 

Chowan 

Rural 

Edenton 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Rural 

Shelby 

Kings Mountain 



l,267.16i 

7,022.70 

6,919.97 

102.73 

20. Oq! 

253. 91 1 

253.91' 

*10.00 



15,510.43 3,498. 00| 1,371.21 1,042.56 

2,000.00 3,179.02j j 

1,483.25 3,263.57 1 

1 I 1 

15,406.291 3,160.92 1,199.771 1,674.87| 

10 090.48 6,764.2-81 725.70 2,784.92' 

: I I 

8,940.48' 678.90 725.70 2,784.92 

700.00' 4,000.00^ 

450.00; 2,085.381 

I I i 

6,798.49 4,161.85; 468.22 



500.00 



5,442.89 
1,355.60 
2,430.13 
25.277.44 
22,507.24 
1,500.00 



468.22'. 

4,161.85 \. 

370. 25J 206. 24j. 
8,499.80, l,303.71j 

2,553.00! l,303.7li 

1 

3,831.00 I. 



831.58 
831.58 



tl,270.20! t2,115.80'. 



Columbus 5,258.79 21,061.42| 12,000.00; 1,227.58 1,614.57 



750.00 
600;00 
600.00 



320.00^ 

' 222.911 

1,800.00| 50.00 
1,800.00 50.00[ 



250.00j 70.00 
400.00 610.00 
400.00, 610.00 



150.00 



500.00!. 
500.00. 



Craven 2,836.15 

Rural ' 2,752.64 



83.51 
424.25 

76.00 
115.41 
232.84 



New Bern 

Cumberland 

Rural 

Fayetteville 

Hope Mills 

Currituck 2,178.74 

Dare 883.08 

Davidson 3,698.76 

Rural 1,900.42 

Lexington *590.28 

Thomasville 1,798.34 

Davie 1,384.64 



22, 361.51! 25,689.03' 1,067.18 
15,497.511 1,367.23; 1,067.18 

6,864.00 124, 321. 80 .. 

23,535.631 14,434.60 l,671.33i 2,531.01 



500.00 1,050.00 

500.00 

500.00 



750.00 



2,171.33: 8,539.53. ...j 

484.10 1,542.61' .! 

; 1 

6,871.72 3,294.231 367.34 1,669.71 

2,^.66.16 1,668.35 239.64 2,488.03 

20,263.45 7,700.84 1,290.73 697.95 

16,834.77 126.40 1,290.73 697.95 

1,899.96 3,907.46... 

1,528.72 3,666.98 



3,570.50- 
150.00. 
250.00 1,000.00 



500.00; 
500.00' 



358.00 



358.00 



8,714.25 314.20 644.661 1,673.46. 500.001. 



*Deficit. t Approximate. 

JOf this amount $14,824.96 is derived from the Griffin Fund (a local fund). 



40.00 
40.00; 



203.97 
203.97 



415.14 
415.14 



4,733.00 498.75 



20,880.20 4,352,46' 1,671.33! 2,531.01 750. OO! 1,012.50! 498.75 



80.00 



605.85' 
605.85' 



420.00 



7,657.73 

17,513.98 

12,604.41 

35,407.80 

24,508.71 

5,347.77 

5,551.32 

23,907.23 

25,056.30 

16,553.76 

4,700.00 

3,802.54 

18,491.26 

12,871.08 

5,620.18 

3,176.62 

36,870.41 

28,153.41 

5,331.00' 

t3,386.0& 

42,712.36. 

52,869.01 

21,599.70 

31,269.31 

48,578.57 

31,772.25 

14,396.77 

2,409.55 

15,711.74 

7,745.26 

35,115.58 

21,956.12 

6,165.42 

6,994.04 

13,651.21 



8 



School Fund, 1908-'09. 



Table I. School Fund and Sources — Continued. 



Balance, 
1907-'08. 



County 

Fund, 

18c. Tax, 

etc. 



Local State State 
Taxes, i First Second 
etc. $100,000. $100,000. 



State 

for 

Public 

High 



Bonds, 

Loan 
Fund, 

Bor- 
rowed 



Schools., Money, 
etc. 



U- I 
braries. 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. I 



Total 
Fund. 



Duplin 

Durham 

Rural 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Rural 

Tarboro 

Forsyth 

Rural 

Winston 

Kernersville 

Franklin 

Rural- - 

Franklinton 

Louisburg 

Youngsville 

Gaston 

Rural 

Gastonia 

Cherry ville 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural - 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford 

Rural 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Guilford College. 



$ 3,245.12 
6,798.93 
5,492.80 
1,306.13 
3,524.00 
3,302.52 
221.48 
1,841.81 
1,788.56 



53.25 

6,955.21 

610.52 



5,826.90 

517.79 

4,026.31 

2,215.72 

1,810.59 

*400.00 

1,285.63 

70.14 

3,369.39 

2,254.45 

1,114.94 

*212.66 

2,837.34 

2,817.24; 

20.10 

*1,539.20 



15,915 
43,889 
29,285 
14,604 
19,169 
14,811 

4,358 
52,636 
40,876 
11,000 
760 
17,992, 
14,972 

1,120 

1,200 

700, 

28,728. 

24,847. 

3,117. 
763. 

9,471. 

3,263. 
28,686. 
25,611. 

3,075, 

9,115 
56,932 
41,401 

9,584 

5,571 
376 



31$ 7,412 
86 1 37,224 
061 5,589 
80 31,635 
07 6,384 
07 2,034 
00 4,349 
18 13,921 
18 760 
00tl2,000 

00 1,161 

01 15,426 
01 1,269 
00 3,691 
00 8,970 
00 1,496 
63 14,120 



45 $1,124.74$ 526.88 

99 2,985.10 

42t2,985.10; 

,57 I 

27] 1,217.80 

,63 1,217.80 



64 



83 1,889.71 
27| 1,889.71 
ooL... 



56 ! 

; 

74i 1,177.14: 1,358.83 
14' 1,177.14 1,358.83 

35I-- I- 



21 



04 ..J. 

83 1,855.06. 
14| 5,573.32 1,855.06. 



50 6,511. 
99 2,036. 
21 1,410. 

77--- 

32 8,116. 

32i 3,458. 

! 
00! 4,657. 

46 

40 43,097. 

40 13,466 

00tl7,633 

00 11,184 

00 810 



50-- I 

I 
01 _ - -..- 

49 565.89 961.89 

I 

.- 228.74; 749.93 

33 1,149.61 

96' l,149.6l! 



37 



750.00$ 1,250.00 
500.00 36,365.74 
500.00 5,000.00 

31,365.74 

750.00 3,675.00 
750.00 3,675.00 



$ 85.00: 
247.15 

247.15 

141.52 
141.52 



1,000.00 250.00 1,479.00 
1,000.00- --. 1,479.00 



I 250.00. 

325.00 2,806.46 
325.00--- _. 

856.46, 



25.00 
25.00 



1,950.00 
875.00 2,558.26; 
875.00 800.00 

1,608.26 

' 150.00 

250.00 _ 



1,050.63 
1,050.63 



155.00 



750.00 1,375.00 310.50 
750,00 1,375.00 310.50 



585.00 576.30 | 

43' 2,508.67 1,125.00 5,960.00 

61 2,508.67, I 1,125.00 --, 



40.00 
175.90 
175.90 



49. 



60.- -.1 5,960.00. 

73 ' i 



30,309.50 
128,011.77 
49,099.53 
78,912.24 
34,861.66 
25,932.54 

8,929.12 
73,018.53 
47,793.72 
23,000.00 

2,224.81 
46,066.39 
19,737.64 

5,667.81 
15,997.11 

4,663.83 
53,214.72 
37,216.87 
13,047.85 

2,950.00 
14,100.11 

4,312.58 
43,757.15 
34,909.84 

8,847.31 
10,316.76 
112,636.74 
61,494.82 
27,239.59 
22,715.60 

1,186.73 



♦Deficit. 

tOf this amount $1,452.10 was brought forward from preceding year, as the State warrant for the appor- 
tionment was not paid till after the fiscal year ended. 
JCity appropriation. 



School Fund, 1908-'09. 



9 



Table I. School Fund and Sources — Continued. 



County 
Balance Fund, 
1907-'08. , 18c. Tax, 
etc. 



Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck. 
Weldon 



$17,752 

16,717 

507, 

*66, 

Enfield 527 

Roanoke Rapids 
Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville _ 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Rural 

Swan Quarter . . 
Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville 

Statesville i 1,377, 

Jackson I *7 

Johnston \ 13,353 

Rural 1 11,244 

Selma I 1,522, 

Smithfield [ 586, 

Jones ; 2,480, 

Lee i 

Rural L 

Sanford I 



03$ 

66 

35 

64 

02 



Local 

Taxes, 

etc. 



1,309 

689 

619 

12,619 

10,342 

2,276, 

684, 

434, 

249, 

2,496, 

6,305, 

6,305, 

*192. 

4,323, 

60, 

2,884. 



30,466.05 $17,864 

23,590.45' 

I 
1,462.001 4,309 

1,871.40 4,329 

1,836.40 3,160 

1,705.80 6,064 

22,808.45' 11,729 

21,908.45 4,000 

900.00 7,729 



13 



State State 

First Second 

$100,000. $100,000. 



$1,614.74$. 
1,614.74'.. 



4,302 
303 



21,503.67 

19,378.67 

2,125.00; 3,998 

12,185.23 5,856 

11,405.62' 2,798 

779.61, 3,058 

10,857.271 

4,447. 49| 2,504 

3,847.49 1,904 

t600.oo' teoo 



51j, 

47', 

91 

24 

11 

00 

11 

19 

96 

23 

99 

23 

76 



931.23 
931.23 



779.16 
779.16 



State 

for 

Public 

High 



Bonds, 
Loan 

Fund, 
Bor- 
rowed 



Schools.! Money, 
etc. 



• Li- 
braries, 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. 



Total 
Fund. 



$ 500.00 $10,835,00 
500.00 : 



$ 670.00$ 
670.00 



759.00', 



10,076.00, 

500.00' 4.50.00 
500.00 450.00 



30.00 
30.00 



500.00'. 

j 

500. Ooi. 



736. 18j 2,355.69 500.00. 
736.18! 2,355.69 500.00. 



24,610.71 



12,320 



20,275.86' 2,307. 

1,965.00| 2,055. 

2,369.851 7,958. 

9,391.34' 3,479. 

28,293.46 12,997. 

25,948.72' 7,763. 

1,150.00, 2,333. 

I 

1,194.741 2,900. 

7,244.62| 2,484. 

7,616.86, 4,504. 

6,360.38 984. 

1,256.48 3,520. 



718.57 
441.39 
441.39 



1,550.61 
1,550.61 



599.95 
1,756.02 
1,756.02 



391.23 
474 . 55 
474.55 



2,082.91 
2,082.91 



1,793.90 
1,793.90 



2,495.94 



270.15 
270.15 



36.08 
36.08 



650,00 
250.00 
250.00 . 



800.00 1,130.00 
20.00 
20.00 



600.00 7,500.00 363.35 
600.00 __._! 363.35 



7,500.00 ....| 

250.00 ; 60. 00! 

750.00 296. 00' 

750.00 



296.00 



1,118.95 
1,534.53 
1,534.53 



500.00 

250.00. 

250.00, 



105.00 
10,00 
10.00 



* Deficit. 

tApproximated. 

i Apportionment of $1,052.79 made, but collected after fiscal year ended. 



79,701.95 

43,092.85 

6,278.86 

6,959.87 

5,524.33 

17,846.04 

37,605.87 

28,357.49 

9,248.38 

40,126.81 

31,726.81 

8,400.00 

22,354.35 

18,266.21 

4,088.14 

16,652.29 

16,051.75 

14,851.75 

tl,200.00 

53,062.42 

26,951.20 

6,905.27 

19,205.95 

16,276.35 

57,447.03 

47,759.38 

5,005.56 

4,682.09 

14,324.59 

14,390.44 

9,613.96 

4,776.48 



10 



School Fund, 1908-'09. 



Table I. School Fund and Sources — Continued. 



' County 
Balance, Fund, 
1907-08. 18c. Tax, 
etc. 



Local 

Taxes, 

etc. 



Lenoir $1,455,90$ 20,445.99 $11,385.84 

i ! 

Rural 880.63' 13,481.33 482.25 



Kinston \ 418. 76i 

LaGrange 156.51 

Lincoln \ 1,843.19: 

Rural ■ 1,678.95^ 

Lincolnton \ 164.24 

Macon 3,893.94 

Madison 12,645.05 

Martin 18,608.66 

Rural ^ 18,263.31, 

Williamston '' 

Robersonville • 345.35 

McDowell j 10,425.47 

Rural ' 9,399.47 

Marion ; 1,026.001 

Mecklenburg , 1,702.05 

Rural ! 701.87 

Charlotte ' 1,000. 18j 

Mitchell 821.44 

Montgomery 4,975.65 

Rural 4,526.82 

Troy 448.83 

Moore | 281.92 

Rural ' 281.92 

Southern Pines _l 

Nash J 13,964. lOi 

1 
Rural 10,441.53 

Rocky Mount--- 3,522.57 

Spring Hope 

New Hanover 10 , 219 . 57 

Rural 10,219.57 

Wilmington ' - ■ 

Northampton 1 7.03 



5,559.66: 8,685.82 

1,405.00 2,217.77 

ll,668.03j 4,881.69 

10,263.19' 1,380.73 

1,404.84 *3,500.96 

6,793.51 1,999.89 

10,068.10 1,426.91 

16,253.8l| 5,165.95 

14,498.8l' 517.29 

1,070.00 2,877.01 

685.00 1,771.65 

11,562.95 6,031.73 

10,599.95 3,808.53 

963. 00| 2,223.20 

62,177.24 34,094.30 

37,666.06 6,303.45 

24.511.18 27,790.85 
7,667.62 583.31 
7,537.92 2,441.74 
6,938.76 1,583.28 
" 599.16 858.46! 

18,194.34 4,662.28! 

17.506.19 1,937.45 
688.151 2,724.83 

26,596.23 37,873.22 

20,849.80' 4,666.78 

t4,399.49 31,355 46 

1,346.94: 1,850.98 
40,427.51 



State State 

First Second 

$100,000. $100,000. 



State 

for 
Public 
High 
Schools. Money, 
etc. 



Li- 



$ 903.43$. 
903.43-. 



875.48 
875.48 



629.57 

1,084.50 

811.49 

811.49 



$ 300.00$ 1,000.00 
300.00 



2,038.29 
2,038.29 



1,204.18 
2,299.22 



737.16; 2,776.08 



737.16 



2,968.21 
2,968.21 



903.01 
707.40 
707.40 



790.47 
790.47 



1,350.39 
1,350.39 



6,285.50. I 

34,142.01 ' 

17,884.48 4,089.50, 



1,060.19 
1,060.19 



2,776.08 



2,603.30 
1,127.91 
1,127.91 



1,721.02 
1,721.02 



Bonds, 

etc. 



Total 
Fund. 



500.00 980.00 

500.00 

980.00 

1,000 00 17,500.00 

1,000.00 

17,500.00 



500.00. 
500 00. 
500.00 



250.00. 
250.00 



500.00 
500.00 



943.111 



906.35: 750.00, 



90.00 S 
90.00 



1,000,00 

500.00 600,00 195.46 

500,00 195,46 

600,00 

500,00 I 329,51 

1 

500 00 1,750,00; 395,00 

500,00 600,001 610,77 

500,00 600,00 610,77 



354. 78i 
354.78! 



571.17 
571,17 

450,00 



707.85 
707.85 



563,95 
563 95 



348,35 
348.35 



65.00 



35,581.16 
16,137.64 
14,664.24 

4,779,28 
22,602,14 
16,932,10 

5,670,04 
15,350,60 
30,168,78 
42,550,68. 
35,801.67 

3,947.01 

2,802.0a 
33,368,17 
28,175,97 

5,192,20 
120,012.97 
49,210.76 
70,802.21 
13,528.68 
17,290,62 
15,384.17 

1,906,45 
26,607.88 
23, 194, 90' 

3,412,98 
80,847.89 
38,372.45 
39,277,52 

3,197,92 
52,055,62 
17,913,61 
34,142,01 
24,645,47- 



*City appropriation. 

t$2,575.00 of this amount was paid by Edgecombe County. 



School Fund, 1908-'09. 



11 



Table I. School Fund and Sources — Continued. 



Balance 

1907-08. 



Onslow $ 1,900.47 

Orange 269.87 

Pamlico 2,531.92 

Pasquotank 3,997. 03i 

Rural ' 19.58 

Elizabeth City--; 3,977.45 

Pender 2,389.00 

Perquimans ' 1,170.16 

Rural ' 1,011.08 

i 

Hertford > 159.08 

Person 259.42 

Rural *330.06' 

Roxboro ' 259.42; 

Pitt 8,117.03 

Rural ' 8,069.831 



County 
Fund, 
18c. Tax, ' 
etc. 



Greenville- 
Polk 



47.20j 
2,204.26! 



Randolph ; 16,013.28 

Rural 1,899.80 

Ashboro ' 14,113.48' 

I 1 

Randleman ' i 

Richmond ■ 5,258.181 

Rural ] 3,188.23( 

Rockingham [ 2,061.87: 

Hamlet ' 8.08' 

Robeson ' 6,783.23 

! 
Rural ! 5,512.16 

Lumberton i *2,166.16 

Maxton i 1,271.07 

Rockingham 4.45 

Rural 4.45 



Reidsville. 

Ruffin 

Madison.. 



*262.01 



9,964 
14,285 

6,523 
12,227 

6,747 

5,480 
10,895 

7,866 

6,866. 

1,000. 
11,956. 
10,556. 

1,400. 
39,204, 
37,652. 

1,552. 

5,797. 
18,370. 
16,700. 

1,090, 

580 

12,966 

11,128 

1,008. 

830. 

37,834. 

35,789. 

1,245. 
800 
31,5iO 
26,351 

3,250 
t652 

1,256 



Local I State , State 
Taxes, ' First Second 
etc. $100,000. $100,000. 



State 

for 

Public 

High 



Bonds, 
Loan 
Fund, 
Bor- 
rowed 



Schools.! Money, 
i etc. 



40$ 2,888.14$ 650.25$ 1,691.59$ 400.00$ 
09 60.00 665.90 

59, 1,899.611 473.11 
49 16,342.14 

49I 



Li- 
braries, 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. 



Total 
Fund. 



$ 167.40$ 

341.55; 250.00 ._ 300.00 

2,476.73| 500.00^ 430.00 26.05 

698.32! ' 35,500.00 193.00 

698.32! -L- ' I 193.00 



00; 16,342.14_-. L.. ' I 35,500.00. 



710.33 
494.21 
494.21 



1,747.20 



.21 4,842.98 
.61 4,398.48 
.61! 

! I 

.00 4,398.48--- ! 

.94 3,466,70' 797. lOJ 1,463.87 

.94 -i 797.10 1,463.87 

i 
.00 3,466.70; - 

,35 11,036.34| 1,663.50 



500.00 2,500.00 



250.00. 
250.00. 



35 4,427.37, 1,663.50 



00 



6,608.97:. 



69 306.96! 324.17 

20 6,952.981 1,401.95 

48 2,337,77 1,401,95 

I 

00 2,770, 2L 

72; 1,845, 00!.... 

871 7,596.93! 875.34 

37 l,019.94j 875.34 

OOj 3,824.811 

50 2,752.18; 

66! 17,336.06; 2,339.19 

66l 10,723.33! 2,339.19 

00 4,210.41' -... 



2,402.32 

9,257.94 1,734.20 
1,734.20 

6,415.94...- 

tl,198.00: 

1,644.00 



1,000.00. 
1,000.00; 



502.33 
502.33: 



750.00. 
750.00!. 



124.50 
131. 59I 
131.59! 



290.00 
290.00 



750.00 7,520.00 375.00 

750.00! 6,020.00 375.00! 

I 1,500.00 

I 
250.00! '.-- 

2,174.42; 1,000. OOj 5,000.00 655.00 

2,174.42; 1,000.00, 4,000 00 055.00 



I 1,000.00 : 

600.00; 1,825.00 708.22 

I ; 

600.00! 1,025.00 708.22 
- 800.00 



681. 90| 

681.90 



40.00 
40.00 



17,662.25 
16,172.41 
14,861.01 
68,957.98 

7,658.39 
61,299.59 
23,709.22 
14,061.05 

8,503.49 

5,557.56 
18,484.03 
13,357.91 

5,126.12 
68,666.22 
58,958.05 

9,708.17 
•8,883.08 
51,568.83 
30,169.42 
17,973.69 

3,425.72 
29,830.54 
18,545.10 

7,694.68 

3,590.76 
65,975.04 
56,046.24 

5,455.41 

4,473.39 
43,799.05 
29,382.61 

9,666.44 
tl,850.00 

2,900.00 



♦Deficit. 



fApproximated. Superintendent failed to report. 



12 



School Fund, 1908-'09. 



Table I. School Fund and Sources — Continued. 



Rowan 

Rural 

Salisbury 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Rural 

Albemarle 

Stokes 

Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy 

Pilot Mountain . 
Swain 



Balance, 



County 
Fund, 



1907-'08. 18c. Tax, 
etc. 



Local State State 
Taxes, First Second 
etc. , $100,000. $100,000. 



5,513.98$ 
5,513.98 



23.08 

137.06 

*586.30l 

137.061 

2,715.00 

2,980.44 

2,980.44 

*1,424.40 

122.96 

2,9fi9.25i 

1,145.98' 

1,823.27 



Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union i 

Rural 

Monroe 

Vance 

Rural 

Henderson 

Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth 



1,259.10 

7,057,22 

1,587.78 

1,919.55 

1,664.58 

254.97 

4,117.09 

4,117.09 

*.02 

869.91 

448.22 

421.69 

12.09 

3,057.80 

2,829.98; 

*459.91| 

227.82 



39,704.14 
33,506.14 

6,198.00 

15,309.35 

28,488.09 

5 27, 528. 09 

960.00 

8,986.63 
12,810.47' 
11,506.59 

1,303.88 
12,5.57.91 
19,663.11; 
17,813.11; 

1,600.00 
250.00 

8,635.32; 

7,067.75 

5,094.54| 
24,185.95 
21,985.95: 

2,200.00 
19,972.18 
13,082.27 

6,889.91 
59,251.33 
43,048.47; 
16,202.86 
12,307.83 

6,220.01 

4,920.01 

t650.00 

650.00 



$ 9,878 
1,376 
t8,502 
828, 
9,410 
7,107 
2,302. 



43$-. 
43' t- 
00... 



State 

for 

Public 

High 

Schools . 



Bonds, 
Loan 
Fund, 
Bor- 
rowed 
Money, 
etc. 



Li- 
braries, 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. 



Total 
Fund. 



$ 750.00$ $ 760.00 

750.00 ; 760.00 



75; 1,323.00 2,746.92; 250.00 

12 1,444.70 2,258. 27J 750.00 

96 1,444.70 2,258.27 750.00 
16' ' 



140.00 



390.00 
155.00 
155.00 



2,265, 
2,265. 

10,257. 

2,642. 

6,905. 
710. 

1,822. 

3,174. 

151. 

10,703. 

4,161. 

6,541. 

9,078. 

2,373. 

6,704. 
31,033. 

7,820. 
23,213. 

4,886. 

3,458. 

190. 

tl,200. 

2,068. 



06 



06 



455.76 
989.77 
989.77; 



336.60 
336.60 



500.00 



500.00 



1,000.00 



..J 951.49: 379.65.. 1 

61 l,454.62i _J 875. 00! 

36 1.454.621 ' 875.00 

25 1... '. 

00 : 



1,000.00 

600.00 115. OOj 
322.59! 

! I 

307.741 

14.85 



471.85 ; 

326.68 1,061.10| 
242.85.. -J 



750.00 

500.00 1,500.00 



28 1,316.72;. 
87| 1,316.72;. 

4lL. I. 



769.99 
769.99 . 



25 985.161, 
64 985.16; 
61 



500.00. 
500.00. 



135.00 



60.00 
60.00 



124.45 
124.45 



65 2,821.36-- 1,250.00 13,375.00 1,093.23 

16; 2,821.36|... --! 1,250.00 8,875.00' 1,093.23 

49-- !-- ' 4,500.00-- 

831,007.10 ' 500.00 30.00 



38; 505.80. 

00 505. so:. 



00 
38. 



500.00 
500.00 



501.15 

( 

501.15 



; 56,606.55 
.41,906.55 
14,700.00 
21,011.10 
42,643.24 
39,244.02 

3,399.22 
13,157.39 
20,382.34 
15,813.40 

4,568.94 
14,727.01 
35,542.18 
24,238.81 
10,343.37 
960.00 
12,938.62 
20,822.42 

7,076.28 
38,955.49 
29,959.11 

8,996.38 
34,777.13 
21,182.61 
13,594.52 
109,694.48 
65,356.44 
44,338.04 
18,743.85 
14,243.14 

9,446.94 
tl, 850.00 

2,946.20 



♦Deficit. 

t Approximate. Superintendent failed to report. 

t Apportionment of $1,686.56 was made, but was not paid till after the fiscal year had ended. 
§By error in tabulating report for preceding j'ear, $8,372.01 was omitted as balance, which is here in- 
cluded with county funds. 



School Fund, 1908-'09. 



o 



Table I. School Fund and Sources — Continued. 



Balance 
1907-'08. 



County 

Fund, 

ISc. Tax, 

etc. 



Local [ State i State 
Taxes, ] First Second 
etc. $100,000. $100,000. 



Watauga... '% 2,478.74$ 6,214.26$ 

Wayne ' 3,185.48 33,145.03 25,837 

Rural 513.23 26,135.18 2,940 

Goldsboro *380.56 4,720.65, 14,704 

Mount OUve 460.23 1,540. id 2,258 

Fremont 2,212.02 749.10 5,933 

Wilkes 174.261 18,259.79] 7,959, 

Rural 76.64! 17,186.54^ 2,824 

Wilkesboro... 370.001 1,597, 

N. Wilkesboro..' 97.62 703.25 3,537, 

Wilson 12,388.42 38,247.96 19,675 

Rural 11,852.10 29,728.96 761, 

Wilson City *289.75; 7,969.00 10,666, 

Lucaraa 536.32: 550.00 8,247, 

Yadkin 1,473.75 9,117.57 395, 

Yancey 922.79 4,895.45 91, 

North Carolina. ..1354, 117. 56 1,762, 779. 34817, 249. 

I 
Rural 286,012.231,477,933.72 237,744, 

City-. I 68,105.33i 284, 845. 62 1 579. 505. 



State 

for 

Public 

High 



Bonds, 
Loan 
Fund, 
Bor- 
rowed 



[Schools. Money, 
etc. _ 



Li- 
braries, 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. 



Total 
Fund. 



...$ 690.35$ 2,179.18!$ $ $ 40,00$ 11,602.53 

83; 1,580.37; _ 750.00 1,946.67, 138.80 66,584.18 

83' 1,580.37!-- 750.00 ..| 138.80 32,058.41 

19 I ! 19,424.84 

86t ! I 1,946.67 6,205.86 

,95 ! ' i -...I 8,895.07 

I 1 I 

88 1,540.69 3,522. 12| 750.00, 2,550.00; t965.00 35,721.74 

60 1,540.69 3,522.121 750.00 2,550.00 t965.00' 29,415.59 

84! !-. ...; : ..| ...-! 1,967.84 

44 i ! 4,338.31 

61 ! 250.00 15,600.00' 125.00 86,286.99 

I I 

26 t I 250.00 1,500.00; 125.00, 44,217.32 

68 ' 14,100.00 i 32,735.68 

67-. \ ! 9,333.99 

00 738.00 1,392.00 300.00 140.00 13,556.32 

53 578.16 2.207.39.... 8,695.32 

82 96, 528. 10 §92, 500. 00 45, 369. 99 220. 070. 96 30. 487. 26 3, 419, 103. 03 

17 96.528.10i 92.500.00 45.369.99 59,302.50 30, 462. 41|2, 325, 863. 12 

1 I ' 

65i : 160.768.46, 14.85!l.093.239.91 



*Deficit. 

tFor libraries exclusively. 

JApportionment of $1,279.27 was made, but was not paid till after the fiscal year ended. 

§$7,250.00 reserved for library funds. 



14 



School Fund, 1908-'09. 



SUPPLEMENT TO TABLE I. RURAL SCHOOL FUNDS NOT REPORTED 
BY COUNTY TREASURERS 190a-'09.* 



Counties. 



Local 
Taxes. 



To 
Donations Donations ^crease ' Miscel- 

Libraries. Buildings. |F^^^' ^^neous. 



Total. 



Alamance . 
Alexander. 
Alleghany. 
Anson 

Ashe 

Beaufort- - 

Bertie 

Bladen 



Brunswick. 
Buncombe. 
Burke 



$ 1,322.91 $ 804.80 $. .1 $ 2,127.71 



5.00 



117.27 



12.00 



195.87 
35.00 



835.00 
172.10 

67.50 
125.00 

25.00 



140.00 



196.23 



9.57.27 
172.10 
471.60 
160.00 
25.00 



140.00 



Cabarrus. 
Caldwell. 



Camden. 



Carteret. - 
Caswell - . 
Catawba. 
Chatham. 
Cherokee- 



Chowan... 

Clay 

Cleveland . 
Columbus. 



Craven 

Cumberland . 

Currituck 

Dare 



30.00 



825.00 
653 00 



332.00 
224.00 



950.00 



60.00 
25.00 
32.31 



35.00 
375.00 
540.87 



405.00 

30.00 

150.00 



18.74 



75.00 
100.00 



75.00 



50.00 



64.35 



106.10 



1,221.35 
907.00 



500.00 

430.00 

1,673.18 



199.84 
100.00 
125.00 



47.93 



640.57 



91.88 



780.38 



Davidson. 
Davie 



Duplin. 



85.00 ; 1,550.00 2,050.00 



3,685.00 



Durham 

Edgecombe. 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 



100.00 



250.00 



1.50 



800 00 



100.00 
155.00 
120.00 

1,817.50 



100.00 
350.00 
156.50 
920.00 
1,817.50 



*These funds did not go into the hands of the County Treasurer, and hence are not included 
in the foregoing table of receipts as a part of the total available fund. 



School Fund, 1908-'09. 



15 



Supplement to Table I. Rural School Funds not Reported by County Treasurers. 



Counties. . 


Local 
Taxes. 


Donations 

for 
Libraries. 


Donations 

for 
Buildings. 


To 

Increase 
School 
Term. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Total. 


Gates 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 250.00 


$ 2.50.00 


Graham - 












Granville 


1 


900.00 

685.70 

1.500.00 


210.00 
85.00 
82.00 




1,110 00 


Greene 


\ 70.00 

i 




840.70 


Guilford 




1,582.00 


Halifax . _ 


1 






Harnett 


i 










Haywood 


i ■ 










Henderson 




15.00 








15.00 


Hertford 





5 00 


25.00 
1.323.34 




30.00 


Hyde 

Iredell 






1 


1,323.34 


i 








Jackson 

Johnston 


J 30 00 

1 20.00 


1,006.57 
197.43 


257.50 


305.98 
70.00 


1,600.05 

287.43 


Jones - . . - _ . - 






Lee - .._._ 




28.31 

40.00 

5.00 




i 


f8.31 


Lenoir. _ . 






i 


40.00 


Lincoln - - _ . _ 




200.00 


75.46 




280.46 


Macon 








Madison 


1 


I 




Martin .. ______ 




600.00 
165.50 
826.53 
275.00 
11,979.76 


100.00 

24.00 

1,528.47 

125.00 
58.00 




700.00 


McDowell . -. - _ 




65.00 


» 


2.54.50 


Mecklenburg _ 






2,355.00 


Mitchell. ... .. . 






400.00 


Montgomery _ 




77.03 


285.97 


12,400.76 


Moore.. 






Nash 


■ 




t 




New Hanover 




31.47 






31.47 


Northampton. . 




400.00 


200.00 




600.00 


Onslow 









Orange 

Pamlico. ... ...... 




769.00 


747.00 
100.00 


57.00 
80.00 


1,573.00 
180.00 


Pasquotank 










Pender 




90.00 

60.00 

40 00 

120.00 


12.00 
36.60 


270.00 
19.99 




372 00 


Perquimans 







116.59 


Person . 




40.00 


Pitt 




610.00 


532.00 


tl,910.00 


3,172.00 



tBy Woman's Betterment Association. 



16 



School Fuxd, 1908-^09. 



Supplement to Table I. Rukal School Funds not Reported by County Treasurers. 



Counties. 


Local 
Taxes. 


Donations 

for 
Libraries. 


Donations 

for 
Buildings. 


To 

Increase 

School 

Term. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Total. 


Polk 

Randolph 


$ 


$ 


$ ---- 

6,850.00 


$ - 

450.00 


$ 


$ ---- 

7,300 00 


Richtnond 










Robeson 








500.00 


255.94 


755.94 


Rockingham 










Rowan 

Rutherford 





90.00 


1,508.54 

400.00 

2,012.90 


2,262.20 

740.00 
934.76 


162.70 


• 3,933.44 
1,140.00 


Sampson 

Spotland 


616.60 


3,654.26 


Stanlv 


300.00 




25.00 


325.00 


Stokes ! 1 






Surry 

Swain 




60.00 


750.00 


1,140.00 


. 


1,950.00 






Transylvania . _ 




130.36 


39.47 




257.07 


426.90 


Tyrrell 








Union 




60.00 
59.00 


17.55 


217.51 

46.00 

3,257.30 


1 
1 


277.51 


Vance 


35.00 

1,554.96 

196.00 




140.00 


Wake 




4,812.26 


Warren _ . _ 


23.50 


237.05 


Washington 






Watauga 




1 




Wavne 








Wilkes .-.--- - . ... 


200.00 

135.00 

5.00 


2,662.00 
172.74 
100.00 
194.00 


44.00 
350.00 

50,00 
100.00 


561.00 


3,467.00 


Wilson - . - _. . 


657.74 


Yadkin 


- 




155.00 


Yancey 






294.00 






Total 


950.00 


1,898.27 


46,945.74 


21,014.81 


5,319.32 


76,128.14 



School Fund, 1908-'09. 



TABLE II. PER CAPITA AMOUNT RAISED FOR EACH CHILD 1908-'09. 

This table shows the school fuucl actually raised during the year,- the per 
capita amount raised for each child of school age, the total amount of all tax- 
able property, and the amount of taxable property for each child of school age. 



Total available fund, 1908-09 

Total available fund, 1907-08 

Increase 

School population, 1908-09 

School population, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Available fund for e;jch child 

Total funds raised for schools by taxation, 1908-'09. 
Total funds raised for schools by taxation, 1907-'08_ 

Increase 

Per capita raised by taxation for each child, 1908-09 . 
Per capita raised by taxation for each child, 1907-'08- 

Increase 

Value of all taxable property 

Taxable property for each child, 1908-'09 



Rural. 



$ 2,325,863.12 
$ 2,160,936.36 



City. 



North 
Carolina. 



$ 



164,926.76 

598,657 

590,550 

8,101 

3.88 

1,715,677.89 

1,530,959.95 

184,717.94 

2.86 

2.59 

.27 



$ 1,093,239.91 ! $3,419,103.03 
$ 1,133,295.34 $3,294,231.70 
$ *40,055.43 $ 124,871.33 



128,908 

125,166 

3,742 

8.32 

864,351.27 

796,049.55 

68,301.72 

6.70 

6.36 

.34 



727,565 

715,716 

11,849 

$ 4.69 

2,580,029.16 

2,327,009.50 

253,019.66 

3.54 

3.25 

.29 

576,115,170.00 

792.00 



♦Decrease. 



TABLE III. AMOUNT RAISED BY TAXATION FOR EACH $100 TAXABLE 
PROPERTY FOR EACH INHABITANT IN 1900. 



• 


Rural. 


City. 


North 
Carolina. 


Available fund for each child 

Per capita amount raised by taxation for each child of 
school age, 1908-'09. 


$ 3.88 
2.86 


$ 8.32 
6.70 


$ 4.69 
3.54 



Taxable property for each child, 1908-09 

Amount raised for each $100 taxable property, 1908-09- 

Per capita amount raised (1908-09) for each inhabitant 
(census 1900). 



792.00 

.44 

1.36 



rart II— 2 



B. SCHOOL EXPENDITURES. 



TABLE IV. SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES 1908-'09. 

This table gives the total amount spent in teaching and supervision, build- 
ings and supplies, administration, etc. ; the balance on hand June 30, 1909, and 
the total expenditures. 

Summary of Table IV and Comparison •wtih 1907-'08. 



Rural. 



Total expenditures, 1908-09 

Total expenditures, 1907-08 

Increase 

Teaching and supervision, 1908-09 

Teaching and supervision, 1907-08 

Increase 

Buildings and supplies, 1908-09 

Buildings and suppHes, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Administration, 1908-09 

Administration, 1907-08 

Increase 

Public high schools 

Loans repaid, interest, etc 

Balance on hand June 30, 1909 

Percentage for teaching and supervision, 1908-09 
Percentage for buildings and supplies, 1908-'09--. 
Percentage for administration, 1908-'09 

♦Decrease. 



2,029,023.77 

1,876,226.05 

152,797.72 

1,336,866.08 

1,241,456.60 

95,409.48 

434,818.98 

463,593.97 

*28,774.99 

92,499.40 

100,677.21 

*S,197.81 

114,480.07 

50,359.24 

296,839.35 

65.8 

21.4 

4.5 



City. 



North 
Carolina. 



1,040,236.59 

1,081,934.14 

*41,697.55 

638,070.52 

603,901.38 

34,169,14 

277,020.98 

340,993.81 

*63,972.83 

23,160.84 

21,563.59 

1,597.25 

101,984.25 
53,003.32 
61.3 
26.6 
2.2 



$3,069,260.36 

2,958,160.19 

111,100.17 

1,974,936.60 

1,845,357.98 

129,578.62 

711,839.96 

804,587.78 

*92,747.82 

115,660.24 

122,240.80 

*6,580.56 

114,480.07 

152,343.49 

349,842.67 

64.3 

23.5 

3.7 



Expenditures, 1908-'09. 



19 



Table IV. Summary of Expenditures — Continued. 



Total 
Fund. 



Alamance $ 

Rural 

Burlington 

Graham 

Haw River 

Mebane 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Rural 

Wadesboro 

1 

Ashe 

Beaufort 

Rural I 

Washington — 
Belhaven 

Bertie i 

Rural , 

Aulander 

Windsor 

Bladen 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Rural 

Asheville 

Burke 

Rural 

Morganton 

Cabarrus 

Rural 

Concord 1 ._. 

CaldweU 

Rural 

Lenoir 

Granite 

Rhodhiss 

Camden 



* Deficit. 
tApproximate. 



Total 
Expendi- 
tures. 



Spent for Spent for 
Teaching Build- 
and ings and 
Super- I Sup- 
vision, plies. 



Spent for 
Admin 



istration. Schools. 



Trans- 
Paid to ferred to 
City High 



School 
Fund. 



67,056.01 

41,234.21 

13,160.62 

6,557.13 

3,319.55 

2,784.50i 

14,190.971 

8,344.48 

32,396.75 

23,046.43 

9,350.32: 

1 
16,014.15 

i 
47,573.63 

28,901.58; 

1 

15,109.35 

3,562.70 

33,882.81; 

26,165.87' 
2,150.00 
5,566.94! 

24,719.80; 

14,075.68! 



$ 50,383.771; 32, 916. 34$10, 831. 75$ 1,320.68$ 8,677.16$ 2,250.00 



Bor- 
rowed I Balance 
Money or 

Repaid, Deficit. 

etc. 



24,873.78 

13,460.09 

6,453.67 

3,308.22 

2,288.01 

10,940.80 

8,313.02 

29,332.33 

19,990. 27i 

9,342.06 

15,203.36 

40,932.19 

22,918.52 

14,744.51' 

3,269.16' 

26,537.94 

19,458.62 

1, 870.00' 

5,209.32! 

24,106.64! 

11,699.85 



116,782.52 113,864.31 
50,300.15' 48,720.45 



66,482.37' 

20,291.54, 

12,049.03 

8,242.51 

38,387.27 

22,497.29 

15,889.98 

28,708.52 

15,235.10' 

10,693.38 

tl,652.60: 

1,127.44 

7,657.73 



65,143.86 

17,219.69 

8,977.18 

8,242.51 

35,925.31 

20,524.80 

15,400.51 

1 

28,100.40' 

15,384.66 

10,320.15 

tl,652.60: 

742.99! 

8,313.12' 



16,599.59: 5,090.64 

7,241.25| 4,189.14 

4, 925. 50' 764.61 

2,350.00 308.11 

1,800.00 479.25 

7,617.37 2,273.68 

5,434.17' 1,759.27 

16,187.50 9,487.06 



I 



11,627.50 5,149.56 
4, 560. 00' 4,337.50 



12,018.47 
30,507.86 



1,376.19 



933.55 8,677.16 2,250.00 

29.70| __j... 

333.56 I 

15.11 
8.76! 
365. 12' 
569.58: 
1,373.94 1,733.41! 2,250.00 
929.38 1,733.41! 2,250.00 
444.56 
492.59 



$ 3,065.00 $16,672.24 

.-__ 16,360.43 

2,000.00 *299.47 



684.63 
550.00 



430.00 
635.00 



5,240.84' 1,545.99! 4,800.00 



103.46 
11.33 

496.49 

! 3,250.17 

I 31.46 

33.83 3,064.42 

33.83 3,056.16 

' -I 8.26 

l,316.1l|. ...I 810.79 

900 00 2,737.50 6,641.44 

18,595.86^ 2,376 52 1,036.64 4,800.00 900 00 9.50 5,983.06 

9,271.00' 2,296.16 509.35 .._ 2,668.00 364.84 

2,641.00 568.16.. ! ! ' 60.00^ 293.54 

18,888.02! 5,782.79 719.13 1,140.00 1,000.00 148.00 7,344.87 

15,033.02! 2,508.47! 719.13' 1,140.00 1,000.00 148.00 6,707.25 

1,460,00 410.00 I j j ....j 280.00 

2,345.00 2,864.32 I '. .. 3.57.62 

15,656.56! 6,148.86! 1,301.22|... : 1,000.00 613.16 

9,607.90] 1,536.59 555. 36J \ ; j 2,375.83 

63,941.10J 35,172 36 4,830.74; 12,464.42 2,250.00 7,670. 11| 2,918.21 

24,609.95! 12,417.31 1,773.08! 12,464.42' 2,250.00 7,670.11: 1,579.70 

39,331.15; 22,755.05 3,057.66 ....\ 1,338.51 



12,144.66 
7,038.16 
5,106.50 
26,098.13 
14,626.16 
11,471.97 
19,001.05 



3,662.69 1,323.04! 

1,167.37 682. 35j 

2,495.32 

8,401.54 

4,551.00 

3,850.54 

6,268.18 



10,915.65i 3,369.41 



721.00. 

! 

721.00. 

640.69' '. 

894.14' 5,030.00 
816.14! 5,030.00, 

78.00.... I. 

I I 

1,999.29; 2,700.00 

599. 60' 2,700.00 



89.30! 3,071.85 
89. 30' 3,071.85 



531.50. 
531.50. 



500.00 
500.00 



271.88 



6,122.80 2,880.42 1,245.05. 



tl,502.60. 
520.00! 
6,372.62 



18.35 
611.62 



I 
tl50.0o! 

4.64:. 

I 

216.12! 



71.881 



2,461.96 

1,972.49 

489.47 

608.12 

*149.56 

373.23 



765.87 



200.00; 
346.89' 



384.45 
*655.39 



.20 



Expenditures^ 1908-'09. 



Table IV. Summaby of Expenditures — Continued. 



Carteret 

Rural 

Catawba 

Rural 

Hickory 

Newton 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Rural 

Andrews 

Murphy 

Chowan 

Rural 

Edenton 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Rural 

Shelby 

Kings Mountain 

Columbus 

Craven 

Rural 

New Bern 

Cumberland 

Rural 

Fayetteville 

Hope Mills 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Rural 

Lexington 

Thomasville 

Davie 

I 
Duplin ' 



Total 
Fund. 



Spent for Spent fori I Trans- I Bor- I 

Total I Teaching Build- Spent for Paid to | ferred to rowed Balance 
Expendi- | and ings and Admin- •■ City | High i Money or 

tures. I Super- Sup- istration. Schools. School Repaid, Deficit, 

vision. ; plies. Fund. etc. 



17,513.98;$ 
12,604.4l| 

35,407.80 

I 
24,508.71 

5,347.77 

5,551.32 

23,907.23; 

25,056.30| 

i 

16,553.76: 

4,700.00; 

3,802.54 
18,491.26! 
12,871.08: 

5,620.18 

3, 176. 62, 
36,870.4li 

28,153.411 

I 

5,331,00 

3,386.00, 
42,712.36; 
52,869.01 
21,599.70 
31,269.31 
48,578.57 
31,772.25 
14,390.77 

2,409.55 
15,711.74 

7,745.26j 
35,115.58' 
21,956. 12i 

6,165.42; 

6,994.04i 
13,651.21 
30,309.50' 



14,507.92$ 

11,489.42; 

33,893,09; 

24,239.281 

5,207.19: 

4,446.62; 

24,073.00 

17,763.91; 

9,593.10 

4,675.00 

3,495,81: 

13,878.27: 

8,811,67; 

5,066.60 

3,176.62 

36,600.41 

28,138.41 

5,076.00 

3,386.00 

41,368.14 

48,189.08 

18,796.83 

29; 392. 25 

46,593.76; 

31,677.21 

12,708,55 

2,208,00 

14,283.97 

7,075.84, 

30,683.10' 

20,029.29; 

6,093.35! 

I 

4,560.46| 
10,646,69! 
29,201.41 



8,082,611 
9,493,23; 

23,553,53 

16,224.03; 
4,510,00' 
2,819, 50j 

15,659.83; 

11,514.12 
4,544,12, 
3,770.00; 
3,200.00 

10,965,81 
6,910.81 
4,055.00; 
2,572.00! 

26,205.29; 

19,000,29 

i 

4, 080, 00; 

3,125,00, 

27,615,86 

24,878,55 

13,262.40 

11,616.15 

30,957.76! 

21,577.45 

8,300.92 

1,079.39 

7,432.20 

6,019.61 

23,745.72 

15,497. 47j 

4,740.00 

3,508,25; 

7,005. 37j 

19,794.82' 



$ 4,902.52$ 

1,378.97 

7,576.06 

5,785.18 

697.19 

1,093.69 

3,468.09, 

2,559.14 

1,968,14 

345,00 

246.00 

2,149,38, 

1,402.17 

747.21 

432.99 

6,177.70 

5, 038. 70; 

890.00 

249.00, 

8,468,15 

20,677.81; 

3,262.53; 

17,415,28; 

10,179.6ll 

7,407.861 

1,983.47 

788.28 

2,061.44' 

746.36 

4;459.24 

; 

2,363.93, 

1,153.10 

942,21 

1,522.97, 

6,641.19' 



$ 522.79 


$ . . . 


$ 1,000 00 « 


$ 3,006,06 


604.41 






12.81 
519.50 


1,114,99 


1,149.23 


3,483.25 


1,094.77 


1,514.71 


1,135.30 


3,483.25 


1,094.77 




269.43 










140 58 


13.93 






519.50 
2,112,94 


1,104,70 


1,332.14 




1,500,00 


*165.77 


885,01 


1,150.00 


1,800.00 


1,005.64 


7,292.39 


835,20 


1,150.00 


1,800.00 


445.64 
560,00 


6,960,66 
25,00 


49.81 






306,73 


763.08 


1,355.60 






4,612,99 


498.69 


1,355.60 






4,059,41 


264.39 








553.58 


171.63 


'" " """ " 






1,142.42 


2,770.20 


1,318,20 


1,756,80 


270,00 


1,024.42 


2,770.20 


1,318.20 


1,756.80 


15,00 


106,00 








255,00 


12 00 








1,578.33 




2,147.00 


1,568,80 


1,344.22 


1,132.72 


6,864.00 


1,500,00 




4,679.93 


771.90 


6,864.00 


1,500,00 




2,802.87 


360.82 








1,877.06 


1,687.47 


2,655,43 


1,500.00 


2,268.92 


1,984.81 


977.20 


2,655,43 


1,500.00 


214,70 


95,04 


665.87 






1,758.29 


1,688,22 


44.40 






295.93 
4,119,96 


201.55 


475.37 




195.00 


1,427.77 


309,87 






669.42 


1,077,89 


3,428,68 


1,000,00 


400 25 


4,432.48 


967.89 


3,428,68 


1,000,00 


200,00 
200,25 


1,926.83 
72.07 


110.00 






2,433.58 


554.15 




1,564.20 


' 


3,004.52 


975,40 




1,600.00 


250,00 


1,048.09 



♦Deficit. 



Expenditures, 1908-'01). 



21 



Table IV. Summary of Expenditures — Continued. 



Total 
Fund. 



I Spent for Spent fori Trans- Bor- 

Total Teaching Build- Spent for Paid to ferred to rowed Balance 
Expendi- and ings and Admin- City High Money or 

tures. ' Super- Sup- istration. Schools. School Repaid, Deficit, 

vision. plies. , i Fund, i etc. 



Durham $ 128,011.77$ 116,940.40$ 64,809.84 $28,733.08$ 3,197.48'$tl4.604.80$ 1,,500.00$18,700.00$11,071.37 



Rural 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Rural 

Tarboro 

Forsyth 

Rural 

Winston 

Kernersville 

Franklin 

Rural 

Franklinton 

Louisburg 

Youngsville 

Gaston 

Rural 

Gastonia 

Cherry villa 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural ' 34,909.84 

Oxford ' 8,847.31' 

Greene ' 10,316.76 

Guilford ' 112,636.74 

Rural 61,494.82 

Greensboro 27,239.59 

High Point 22,71.5.60 

Guilford College , 1 , 186 . 73 
Halifax 79,701.95 

Rural 43,092.85 

Scotland Neck _ 6,278.86 

Weldon 

Enfleld 

Roanoke Rapids 



49,099.53 39,367.17 
78,912.24; 77,573.23 
34,861.66* 35,146.31 



25,932.54 

8,929.12 
73,018.53: 
47,793.72, 
23,000.00 

2,224,81 
46,066.39 
19,737.64 

5,667.81 
15,997.11 

4,663.83 
53,214.72 
37,216.87: 
13,047.85 

2,9.50.00 
14,100.11 

4,312.58 
43,757.15 



6,959.87 

5,524.33 

17,846.04 



26,346.96 

8,799.35 

64,420.57 

39,223.34 

23,000.00 

2,197.231 

40,553.47, 

18,449.04 

5,208.53 

12,622.56 

t 

4,273.34 

52,668.67 

36,702.07: 

13,047.85 

2,918.75 

13,317.94 

4,081.97; 

45,462.99 

37,379.09 

8,083.90 

9,959.42 

105,177.08 

54,311.21 

27,239.59 

22,490.68 

1,186.73 

62,048.37 

27,001.77 

6,512.16 

7,170.88 

4,642.75 

16,714.81 



22,222.09; 14,373.33 l,271.75il4,604.80 1,500.00 9,732.36 

42, .587.751 14,359.75 1,925.73 18,700.00; 1,339.01 

23,480.981 9,P34.27 1,381.06 6,933.00 1,250.00. \ *284.65 

17,075.98 6,951.19 1,069.79 §6,933.00 1,250.00'. ...j *414.42 

6,405.00 2,083.08 311.27 ....' | 129.77 

44,209.32' 15,143.79 1,344.09: 11,760.00 3,018.87; 704.50 8,597.96 

23,334.32 11,886.66 978.99 11,760.00 3,018.87 4.50, 8,570.38 

! 

19,890.00 3,010.00 100.00 1 I. 

985.00 247.13 265.10 ...^ 700.00 27.58 

22,868.11 14,545.53 1,851.70; 3,020.00, 650. Ooi 638.13 5,512.92 

13,848.07 2,635.06 1,315.91 3,020.00' 650.00 i 1,288.60 



3,175.04 1,947.24 

4,160.00 7,609.38' 

1,685.00 2,353.85 

35,026.66 13,253.98- 



86.25, 

323. 18. _ 

126.36 

1,128.49 3,881.49, 2,625.00 



459.28 

530.00' 3,374.55 

108.13 390.49 

634.54 546.05 

34.54 514.80 



2,250.00 



600.00 31.25 

979.72 782.17 

264.47 230.61 

625.00 *1,705.84 



23,867.911 9,070.13 1,104.49 3,881.49! 2,625.00 

9,039.00 4,004 85 4.00 __ 

2,119.75 179.00 20.00.... I ' 

8,173.29 3,157.28 507.65 I 500.00 

3,433.50 93 49 290 51 

23,515.791 16,859.99 2,212.21 3,075.00 

17,647.45' 15,612.37 1,869.27 3,075.0o' 2,250.00 ! *2,469.25 

5,868.34^ 1,247.62 342.94.... |. ...: 625.00 763.41 

7,050.71 1,923.28 447.51. i 537.92 357.34 

71,891.89 18,390.75 3,708.54 15,531.00: 3,375.00 7,862.03 7,408.53 

35,577.85 10,616.98 2,779.35 15,531.00 3,375.00, 1,962.03 7,183.61 

22,546.54 4,401.80 291.25 

12,717.50 3,286.37 586.81. 

1,050.00 85.60 51.13 

I ! 

37,252.04 19,789.73 2,008.14 6,875.60 1,500.00 1,498.46 17,653.58 

21,669.65 2,165.30 1,168 36 6,875.60 1,500.00 498.46 16,091.08 

4,830.00 1,182.16 ! ' 500.00 *233.30 

4,962.39 1,962.99 251.50 I *217.01 

3,350.00 566.47 226.28 ..! 500.00 881.58 

2,440.00 13,912.81 362.00 ' ' 1,131.23 



5,900.00 224.92 



♦Deficit. 

tThe sheriff pays directly to the treasurer of Durham City its part of the funds collected from county taxes. 

§$2,575.00 was paid to Rocky Mount. Accounted for in report of city superintendent. 



9,>) 



EXPE^TDITUEES, 1908-'09. 
Table IV. Summary of Expenditures— Conimwecf. 



Total 
Fund. 



Total 
Expendi- 
tures. 



Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville. 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Rural 

Swan Quarter.. 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville 

Statesville 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

Smithfield 

Jones 

Lee 

Rural 

Sanford 

Lenoir 

Rural 

Kinston. 

LaG range 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincolnton 

Macon 

Madison 



Spent for 
Teaching 
and 
Super- 
vision. 



37,605.87j$ 
28,357.49| 

9,248.38 
40,126.81; 
31,726.81 

8,400.00 
22,354.35 
18,266.21 

4,088.14 
16,652.29 
16,051.75 
14,851.75 
tl,200.00 
53,062.42 
26,951.20 

6,905.27 
19,205.951 
16,276.35, 
57,447.03 
47,759.38 

5,005.56' 

4,682.09, 
14,324.59 
14,390.44; 

9,613.96 

4,776.48| 
35,581.16i 
16,137.64! 
14,664.24 

4,779.28 
22,602.14, 
16,932.10 

5,670.04 
15,350.60: 
30,168.78 



34,918.36 5 
27,055.15, 

7,863.21' 
27,837.95 
17,564.851 

8,148.10 
20,805.20 
16,805-74 

3,999.46 
15,985.65 
10,476.26 

9,276.26 
tl,200 00 
48,784.33 
27,133.55 

5,630.13 
16,020.65; 
15,820.54, 
46,376.14 
39,163.49 

3,581.56 

3,631.09 
II7628.54 
13,868.78 

9,092,77 

4,776.01 
35,011.57 
17,128.80l 
13,170.19 

4,712.58' 
21,643.10 
15,735.05 

5,908.05 
14,399.97; 
18,067.80 



19,952.26 

16,207.01 

3,745.25 

20,152.55 

14,027.05 

6,125.50 

14,245.00 

11,030.00 

3,215.00 

8,928.43 

6,606.84 

5,406.84 

tl,200.00 

28,982.19 

17,576.79 

4,404.00 

7,001.40 

10,600.75 

32,794.81 

26,540.31 

3,192.00, 

3,062.50 

8,159.11 

10,848.69 

7,228.69 

3,620.00 

26,743.43| 

12,912.10 

11,786.33! 

2,045.00' 

15,937.75 

11,082.65 

4,855.10, 

10,407. 35j 

9,938.11 



Spent for | Trans- | Bor- 

Build- Spent for Paid to f erred to; rowed Balance 



ings and Admin- '• City High 

Sup- istration. Schools. School 
plies. Fund. 



7,325.281 
7,013.86 

311.42. 
3,273.03 
1,250.43 
2,022.60,'- 
3,777.10 
3,026. 20[ 

750.90 
3,166.54i 
2,682.571 
2,682.57; 



1,431.73 
1,431.73 



787.37 
787.37 



Money or 

Repaid, Deficit, 
etc. 



$ $ 1,092.00$ 5,117.09$ 2,687.51 



900.00 1,092.00 



2,125.00 1,500.00 
2,125.00 1,500.00 



1,890.11 

1,856.55 

33.56 

654.76 

386.55 

386.55 



12, 784.981 
7,233,33 

832.40 
4,719,25 
4,192.69| 
9,215.63 
8,617.42: 

290.79 

307.42 
2,094.48! 
1,719.71 

609.70' 
1,110.01 
5,859.33 
2,321.20 
1,175.84 
2,362.29 
3,835.57 
2,801.14 
1,034.43 
3,007.65 
6,356.67 



779.61 
779.61 



600.00 
600.00 



4,334.85 
4,334.85 



1,243.35 
1,243.35 



500.00 
2,300.00 
2,300.00 



1,571.31 
1,077.58 

393.73 

100.00 

527.10 
1,820.02' 2,344.74 
1,648.13 2,344.74 
95.79 
76.10 

374.95 

465.96 

419.96 

46.00 

1,367.06! 7,935.58 

995.50 6,964.66 

208.02. 

163.54-. 

I 
804.53 1,404.84 1,015.59 



1,256.48 
1,256.48 



1,310.55 1,302.34 

3,806.54 1,385.17 

- 14,413.86 

14,161.96 

251.90 



750. 00| 142.99 1,549.15 
750.00 142.99 1,460.47 
88.68 
666.64 
159.70 5,575.49 
159.70 5,575.49 



1,950.00! 1,285.92 
640.60 
640.60 



4,202.50, 
2.50i 



4,200.00 



1,000.00 
625.00 
625.00 



245.68 

57.63 

2.98 

185.07 



209.42 
209.42 



900.00; 
900,00, 



141, 



786.01 1,404,84 

18,52 

504.81- 

773.02 



1,015.59 



141.75 
49.66 
49.66 



480.16, 
1,000.00, 



4,278.09 

*182.35 

1,275,14 

3,185.30 

455.81 

11,070.89 

8,595.89 

1,424.00 

1,051.00 

2,696.05 

521.66 

521.19 

.47 

569.59 

*991.16 

1,494.05 

66.70 

9.59.04 

1,197.05 

*238.01 

950.63 

12,100.98 



* Deficit. 
tApproximate. 



Expenditures^ 1908-'09. 



23 



Table IV. Summary of Expenditures — Continued. 



Total 
Fund. 



! Spent for 'Spent for' ' ' Trans- Bor- 

Total ' Teaching Build- Spent for Paid to ferred to rowed Balance 
Expendi- : and ings and Admin- City High Money or 

lures. Super- Sup- istration. Schools. School Repaid, Deficit, 

vision. plies. Fund. , etc. 



Martin 

Rural 

Williamston 

Robersonville.. 

McDowell 

Rural 

Marion 

Mecldenburg 

Rural 

Charlotte 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Rural 

Troy 

Moore 

Rural 

Southern Pines. 

Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount.. 

Spring Hope 

New Hanover 

Rural 

AVilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Rural 

Elizabeth City . 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 



$ 42,550 
35,801 

3,947 

2,802 
33,368 
28,175 

5,192 
120,012 
49,210 
70,802 
13,528 
17,290 
15,384 

1,906 
26,607 
23,194 

3,412 
80,847 
38,372 
39,277 

3,197 
52,055 
17,913 
34,142 
24,645 
17,662 
16,172 
14,861 
68,957 

7,658 
61,299 
23,709 
14,061 

8,503 

5,557 



68j$ 23,801. 19;S 15,488.34 



$ 5,131.231$ 1,342.49$ 1,755.00:$ 1,500.00;$ 339.13 $18,749.49 



17,406.92. 

4,0.53.67 

2,340.60 
24,581.33 
19,442.64 

5,138.69 
117,235.95 
76i 46,423.67 
21! 70,812.28 
68^ 12,825.02 
16,914.34 
14,508.39 

2,405.95 
21,916.83 
19,202.43 

2,714.40 
76,247.00 
33,629.88 
39,560.11 

3,057.01 
45,475.12 
11,333.11 
34,142.01 
24,526.63 
16,638.74 
15,776.82 
11,819.91 
67.399.37 

7,611.87J 
59,787.50J 
20,601.70 
12,830.67 

7,295.54 

5,535.13' 



ll,288.34i 3,664.59 

2,400.00' 990.94 

1,800.00' 475.70 

13,502.83! 7,224.98 

10,077. 83i 6,109.17! 

3,425.00 1,115.81 

71,446.681 21,807.35; 

27,805.46 14,534.02; 

43,641.22 7,273.33; 

9,387.94! 1,682.50^ 

10,,528.30| 1,684.84: 

8,548.30 1,299.591 

1,980.00 385.251 

15,856.14 3,094.30 

13,841.74 2,396.30 

2,014.40' 698.00! 

36,362.271 36,689. 30J 

20,160.17 10,417.58] 

13,739. lOj 25,696.011 

2,463.00 575.71' 

36,891.70 7,103.89; 

8,542.50 1,311.08' 

28,349.20| 5,792.8l! 

16,644.381 3,572.58 



953. 99i 1,755.00 

I 

323 60 

64.90 

2,236.77; 963.00 
2,155.64; 963.00 

81.13.. 

4,231.92 24,511.18 
1,834.19 24,511.18 
2,397.73.... 

501.98 

975. 24i 599.16 



1,500.00 I 18,394.75 

..I 339.13' *106.66 

461.40 
1,040.001 576.75 



1,040.00 



8,786.84 
60.00; 8,733.33 
516. 75| 53.51 
2,250.00 17,500.00 2,777.02 



934.54 
40.70' ..! 

619.32 688.15' 
617.. 32 688.15; 

2.00'... 

1, 531.061 3,171.43 
1,387.76 3,171.43 

125.00 

18.30 

1,473.07| 34,142.01 
1,473.07! 34,142.01 



2,250.00; | 

! 17,500.00 

1,208.60; 44.00' 

1,000.00 2,725.96| 

I 

599.16, 1,000.00 2,725.96' 



2,787.09 
*10.07 
703.66 
376.28 
875.78 

*499.50 

I 
750.00 1,597.07; 4,691.05 

750.00' 1,597.07' 3,992.47 

698.58 

1,500.00 164. 37i 4,600.89 

1,500.00 164.37! 4,742.57 

i *282.59 

:. __ 140.91 

! 6.46; 6,580.50 

6.46| 6,580,50 



13,215.17 
11,321.13 



1,991.98 
2,532.85 



7,068.38 3,082.42 

19, 976. 40! 42,782.89 

5,391.60' 1,791.49 

14,584.80i 40,991.401 

12,500.951 5,012.51 

8,743. 42i 3,804.83| 

5,505.92 1,507.20 

3,237.50' 2,297.63 



965.92 2,343.75 1,000.001 118.84 

628.09 800.00 3.50| 1,023.51 

i 

631.15! 500.00: 791.69 395.59 

494.11! 1,175.00'.... 3,041.10 

l,018.6l' 5,480.00 3,621.47 1,558.61 

428.78 5,480.00 46.52 

589.83! j j 3,621.47 1,512.09 

1,310.871 1,1.55.00 622.37 3,107.52 

282. 42i 1,000.00 1,230.38 

282.42' 1,000.00 1,207.95 

22.43 



♦Deficit. 



24 



Expenditures^ 1908-'09. 



Table IV. Summary of Expenditures — Continued. 



Total 
Fund. 



Person $ 

Rural 

Roxboro 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville 

Polk 

Randolph 

Rural 

Ashborol 

Randleman 

Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham.. 
Hamlet 

Robeson 

Rural 

Lumberton 

Maxton 

Rockingham 

Rural 

Reidsville 

Ruffin 

Madison 

Rowan 

Rural 

Salisbury 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Rural 

Albemarle 

Stokes 



I Spent for 'Spent for I 

Total j Teaching Build- Spent for 
Expendi- \ and ; ings and i Admin- 
tures. Super- Sup- |istration. 

vision. plies. 



I Trans- Bor- I 
Paid to f erred to rowed Balance 

City High Money or 

Schools. \ School \ Repaid, Deficit. 

Fund. I etc. 



18,484,03! 

13,357.91; 

I 

5,126.12 

68,666.22 

58,958.051 

! 

9,708.171 

1 

8,883.08 

51,568.83J 

30,169.42! 

I 

17,973.69: 

3,425.72 
29,830.54 
18,545.10 

7,694.68 

3,590.76 
65,975.04 
56,046.24 

5,455.41! 

4,473.39 
43,799.05: 
29,382.61 

9,666.44 
tl,850.00 

2,900.00 
56,606.55 
41,906.55 
tl4,700.00 
21,011.10 
42,643.24 
39,244.02 

3,399.22 
13,157.39 
20,382.34 
15,813.40 

4,568.94 
14,727.01 



17,730.99 

13,033.92 

4,697.07 

54,160.77 

44,712.29 

9,448.48: 

7,. 546. 46' 

52,117.00: 

29,625. lOj 

I 

19,066.18 

3,425.721 

26,091.17! 

15,115.84 

7,391.08 

3,584.25 

63,016.45 

53,860.29 

5,455.41 

3,700.75 

43,375.08 

29,420.00 

9,315.08 

tl,850.00 

2,790.00 

i 
48,776.68' 

34,076.68 

tl4,700.00 

20,200.89 

38,732.66| 

35,408.47 

3,324.19 

1 

11,584.97: 

18,119.12' 

13,661.77; 

4,457.35, 

14,184.26 



15,091.60$ 1,043.44$ 765.89,3 

10,965.60 618.36' 619.90 

4,126.00 425.08 145.99. 

37,687.30 11,687.98 1,881.67| 

30,510.50; 9,416.30 1,881.67 

7,176.80 2,271.68 

5,832.40 742.82 471.24. 

22,162.89 11,587.25 1,433.00 

16,762.89 9,571.10 1,291.11 

3,080.00 1,265.81 106.89. 

2,320.00 750.34 35.00. 

16,518.111 7,266.91 506.15 

9,578. Ill 3,249.58 488.15 

4,375.00: 3,016.08._._ 

2,565.00 1,001.25 18.00. 

43,463.85J 11,475.70 2,669.88: 

36,318.85 10,032.95! 2,598.881 

4,427.50 480.50-... '. 

2,717.50' 912.25 71.00 

I 

28,064.28 12,123.25| 1,694. 27, 

17,534.28 10,023.79' 844.65 

j 

6,650.00 1,674.46' 514.62. 

tl,300.00 t250.00 t300.00. 

2,580.00 175.00 35.00. 

38,277.04 7,346.08; 903.56 

24,277.04 6,646.08' 903.56 

14,000.00 700.00 .. 

15,936.21 2,651.78 1,112.90 

23,833.98 7,504.07 1,751.05 

21,023.98 7,336.96 1,669.07 

2,810.00 167.11 81.98 



1,400.00$ 500.00$ 330.06 

1,400.00 500.00 330.06 

1,552.00 2,750.00 153.82 

1,552.00 2,750.00 153.82 



._ I 500.00 

1,670.72 2,000.00 14,933.86 

1,670.72 2.000.00 

14,613.48 
320.38 

1,838.50 1,800.00 

1,838.50 1,800.00 



2,045.00 3,368.77 2,038.25; 
2,045.00 3.368.77 1,490.84 

! 547.41'. 



5,158.50 
5,158.50 



750.00 743.28 

! 

750.00 267.28 
1 476.00 



S 753.04 
323.99 
429.05 

14,505.45 

14,245.76 

259.69 

1,336.62 

■ *548.17 
544.32 

*1,092.49 

3,739.37 
3,429.26 
303.60 
6.51 
2,958.59 
2,185.95 

772.64 
423 97 
*37.39 
351.36 



' 110.00 

6,198.00 2,250.00 i 7,829.87 

6,198.00 2,250.00: 7,829.87 



8,019.95 1,625.98 439.04 

13,737.65 3,941.34 440.13 

10,790.40] 2,475.12; 396.25 

2,947.251 1,466.22, 43.88 

I 

11,040.64' 2,289.35 854.27 



500.00 i 810.21 

960.00 1,500.00 4,143.56 3,910.58 

960.00 1,500.00 3,878.46 3,835.55 

j 265.10 75.03 

1,500.00 ! 1,572.42 

1,303.88 I ....I 2,263.22 



l,303.88i 



2,151.63 
111.59 
542.75 



♦Deficit. 



tApproxiraate. Superintendent failed to report. 



EXPENDITUKES^ 1908-'09. 



25 



Table IV. Summaky of Expenditures — Continued. 




Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy 

Pilot Mountain. 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Rural 

Monroe 

Vance 

Rural 

Henderson 

Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth 

Watauga 

Wayne . 

Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive 

Fremont 

Wilkes 

Rural 

Wilkesboro 

N. Wilkesboro . 

Wilson 

Rural 

Wilson City 

Lucama 



^$ 35,542.18 
.| 24,238.81 

I 

10,343.37 
960.00 



Spent for Spent for 
Teaching ; Build- 'Spent for 



and 
Super- 
vision. 



ings and j Admin- 
Sup- |istration. 
plies. 



$ 34,350.11$ 22,179.018 8,456.18$ 860.22 

i i 

01 5,831.53 860.22 

OOi 2,445.34 



' Trans- I Bor 
Paid to ferred to rowed 



City ! High 
Schools. School 
Fund. 



Balance 
Money or 

Repaid, Deficit, 
etc. 



23,878.76: 

9,642.04 

829. 31 ! 



12,938.62: 11,094.25 
20,822.42 14,462.05 



7,076.28^ 
38,955.49 
29,959.11 

8,996.38 
34,777.13 
21,182.61 
13,594.52 



5,698.57 
36,346.53 
27,673.31 

8,673.22 
31,687.49 
18,154.97' 
13,532.52 



109,694.48| 103,322.081 
65,356.44 62,632.30: 



44,338.04' 

18, 743. 85' 

14,243.14 

I 

9,446.94! 

tl,850.0o' 

i 

2,946.20 

11,602.53^ 

66,584.18' 

32,058.41 

19,424.84' 

6,205.86 

8,895.07, 

35,721.74; 

29,415.59| 

1,967.84| 

4,338.31| 

86,286.99' 

44,217.32 

32,735.68 

9,332.99 



14,562 

6,967 

650 

7,664 

8,193 

4,437 

30,739 

23,079 

7,660 

22,625 

11,901 

10,723 

58,372 

28,769 

29,602 

12,940 

9,991 

5,351 



179.31 
1,546.52 
4,330.55 
1,004.92 
2,978.11 
25i 2,006.89 
00 971.22 



40,689.78 
18,712.67 
12,654.57 

7,863.46 

tl,850.00 tl,850 

2,941.11' 2,790 

10,011.56 7,596 

58,231.60; 39,908 

28,467.10 17,305 

19,276.16 16,311 

4,618.40 3,505 

1 

5,869.94: 2,787 

34,885.971 25,012 

29,062. 39i 20,077 

1 

1,967.84J 1,775 

3,855.741 3,160 

65,926.79 32,790 

32,282.03' 18,726 

32,534.76: 13,083 

1,110.00' 980 



3,949.19 
2,672.09 
1,277.10 
27,643.91 
19,133.60 
8,510.31 

00, 3,029.06 

t 
00 1 675.33 

00' 545.68 

00 



383.26 

757.09 

255.76 

1,081.67 

1,039.67 

42.00 

1,161.58 

978.41 

183.17 

6,947.98 

4,370.90 

2,577.08 

1,241.45 

464.08 

464.08 



1,850.00$ 2,625.00$ 229.70$ 

1,850.00 2,625.00 

229.70, 



1,500.00 
1,000.00; 



181.32 



2,200.00 1,547.50! 
2,200.00 1,547.50 



6,889.91 
6,889.91 



1,487,40 
1,487.40 



16,202.86 4,296.20 
16,202.86, 4,296.20 



1,500.00 

1,300.00 1,500.00 



1,300.00 



00 129.65 
15, 596.83 
74; 14,487.61 
25: 8,149.64 
49 2,342.00 

00 ti.ooo.oo 



2,995.97 

6,569.47 

5,816.43 

119.04 

634.00 

361 13,362.35 

86 9,918.49 

I 
50| 3,313.86 

00 130.00 



319.25. 
1,811.80 
1,437.21 
242.11. 
tll3.40. 
19.08. 
1,467.91 
1,380.47; 
25.70'. 
61.74. 
1,555.65 
1,208.00 
347.65. 



7,009.85 
7,009.85 



1,500.00 



2,464.30 
1,115.55 
1,348.75' 
6,061.69| 
6,061.69 



2.16 

24.16 

2.70 



1,192.07 

360.05 

701.33 

130.69 

1,844.37 

6,360.37 

1,377.71 

2,608.96 

2,285.80 

323.16 

3,089.64 

3,027.64 

62.00 

6,372.40 

2,724.14 

3,648.26 

31.18 

1,588.57 

1,583.48 



1,073.25 
1,073.25 



8,519.00 
8,519.00 



21.46 5.09 

_-- ; 1,499.33; 1,590.97 

1,575.00 448.45' 8,352.58 

l,575.00-__ ; 3,591.31 

■ 380.56: 148.68 

1,587.46 

67.89 3,025.13 

1,500.00 335.74 835.77 

1,500.00 287.64 353.20 

..' 48.10 

482.57 

825.00! 17,393.43 20,360.20 

! !■ 

825.00 1,603.68 11,935.29 

15,789.75 200.92 

1 
' 8,223.99 



♦Deficit. tApproximate. Superintendent failed to report. 



26 



Expenditures, 1908-'09. 



Table IV. Summary of Expenditures — Continued. 



Yadkin - 
Yancey. 



Total 
Fund. 



13,556.32 
8,695.32 



Total 
Expendi- 
tures. 



Spent for Spent fori | Trans 

Teaching Build- Spent for Paid to ferred to 
and ing.s and Admin- , City High 



Super- 
vision. 



S 12,178.911$ 
7,785.22; 



9,635.08 



Sup- 
plies. 



istration.j Schools. 



School 
Fund. 



Bor- 
rowed ' Balance 
Money or 

Repaid, Deficit. 

etc. 



$ 1,474.83 



6,294.00] 1,079.26 



North Carolina ..3,419,103.03 3,069,260.361,974,936.60 
Rural 12,325,863. 12,2,029, 023. 771,336, 866. 08 



711,839.96 
434,818.98 



City , 1,093, 239. 9l!l, 040, 236.591 638,070.52:277,020.98 



469.00j$. 
411.96L_ 



600.00$. 



j$ 1,377.41 
I 910.10 



115,660.241286,420.54 114,480.07 

i I 
92,499.40 28,420.54114,480.07 

23,160.841 



152,343.49 349,842.67 

50,359.24 296,839.35 

101,984.25! 53,003.32 



EXPE^-DITUKES, 1908-'09. 



27 



TABLE V. SPENT FOR TEACHING AND SUPERVISION 1908-09. 

This table shows the amount of money expended for teaching and supervi- 
sion, and a comparison with the total amount spent for schools. 

Summary of Table V and Comparison with 1907-'08. 



Rural. 



City. 



North 
Carolina. 



All expenditures, 1908-09 

All expenditures, 1907-08 

For supervision (superintendents) , 1908-'09 

For supervision (superintendents) , 1907-08 

Increase 

White teachers, 1908-09 . 

Wliite teachers, 1907-08 . 

Increase : 

Colored teachers, 1908-09 

Colored teachers, 1907-08 

Increase 

Total spent for teaching and supervision, 1908-09 

Total spent for teaching and supervision, 1907-08 

Increase 

Percentage spent for teaching and supervision, 1908-09. 
Percentage spent for teaching and supervision, 1907-'08- 

Increase . 

Percentage spent for supervision alone, 1908-09 

Percentage spent for supervision alone, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Average salary of superintendents, 1908-09 

Average salary of superintendents, 1907-'08 

Increase 



$2,029,023.77 
1,876,226.0.5 
71,910.32 
67,183.82 
4,726.50 
1,037,442.78 
952,445.93 
74,996.85 
227,512.98 
221,826.85 
5,686.13 
1,336,866.08 
1,241,456.60 
95,409.48 
65.9 
66.2 
*.3 
3.5 
3.6 
*.l 
$ 733.77 
692.61 
41.16 



SI, 040, 236 .59 
1,081,934.14 
94,993.57 
90,117.01 
4,876.56 
449,555.48 
421,697.28 
27,858.20 
93,521.47 
92,087.09 
1,434.38 
638,070.52 
603,901.38 
34,169.14 
61.3 
55.7 
5.6 
9.1 
8.3 
.8 
$ 1,091.88 
1,112.55 
*20.67 



$3,069,260.36. 
2,958,160.19 
166,903.89 
157,300.83 
9,603.06 
1,486, 998. 2& 
1,374,143.21 
112,855.05 
321,034.45 
313,913.94 
7,120.51 
1,974,936.60 
1,845,357.98 
129,578.62 
64.3 
62.4 
1.9 
5.4 
5.0 
.4 
$ 902.18- 

883.71 
18.47 



Superin- 
tendents. 



White 
Teachers. 



Colored 
Teachers. 



Total for 
Teaching and 
Supervision. 



Alamance 

Rural 

Burlington- 
Graham 

Haw River. 

Mebane 

Alexander 

Alleghany 



4,766.29 
1,266.29 
1,500.00 
1,200.00 
800.00 



458.80 
291.68 



23,817.47 
12,487.47 
5,291.25 
3,278.75 
1,400.00 
1,360.00 
6,746.20 
4,878.49 



$ 4,332.58 


2,845.83 


450.00 


446.75 


150.00 


440.00 


412.37 


264.00 



32,916.34 
16,599.59 
7,241.25 
4,925.50 
2,350.00 
1,800.00 
7,617.37 
5,434.17 



♦Decrease. 



28 



Expenditures^ 1908-'09. 



Table V. Spent for Teaching and Supervision — Continued. 



Superin- 
tendents. 



White 
Teachers. 



Colored 

Teachers. 



Total for 
Teaching and 
Supervision. 



Anson 

Rural 

Wadesboro- - 

Ashe 

Beaufort 

Rural 

Washington. 

Belhaven 

Bertie 

Rural 

Aulander 

Windsor 

Bladen 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Rural 

Asheville 

Burke 

Rural 

Morganton. . 

Cabarrus 

Rural 

Concord 

Caldwell 

Rural 

Lenoir 

Granite 

Rhodhiss 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Rural 

Hickory 

Newton 

Chatham 



1,846.00 

646.00 

1,200.00 

400.00 

3,000.00 

700.00 

1,500.00 

800.00 

2,230.00 

710.00 

720.00 

800.00 

845.00 

t704.00 

3,896.63 

1,880.00 

2,016.63 

1,866.00 

666.00 

1,200.00 

2,500.00 

1,000.00 

1,500.00 

1,657.33 

657.33 

1,000.00 



252.00 
300.00 
674.99 

2,500.00 
600.00 

1,000.00 
900.00 
734,00 



10,080.48 

7,440.48 

2,640.00 

11,208.34 

21,538.35 

13,906.35 

6,271.00 

1,361.00 

11,869.15 

10,009.15 

740.00 

1,120.00 

11,034.26 

6,741.91 

52,270.97 

21,450.70 

30,820.27 

9,015.72 

5,689.22 

3,326.50 

20,127.97 

11,774.75 

8,353.22 

15,904.52 

9,313.32 

4,568.60 

1,502.60 

520.00 

4, 854 ..70 

7,072.61 

5,800.02 

19,146.13 

14,438.63 

2,987.50 

1,720.00 

11,417.84 



4,261.02 

3,541.02 

720.00 

410.13 

5,969.51 

3,989.51 

1,500.00 

480.00 

4,788.87 

4,363.87 



425.00 


3,777.30 


2,161.99 


7,773.50 


1,279.25 


6,494.25 


1,262.94 


682.94 


580.00 


3,470.16 


1,851.41 


1,618.75 


1,499.20 


945.00 


554.20 





1,265.92 

710.00 

3,018.22 

1,907.40 

1,185.40 

522.50 

199.50 

3,507.99 



16,187.50 

11,627.50 

4,560.00 

12,018.47 

30,507.86 

18,595.86 

9,271.00 

2,641.00 

18,888.02 

15,083.02 

1,460.00 

2,345.00 

15,656.56 

9,607.90 

63,941.10 

24,609.95 

39,331.15 

12,144 66 

7,038.16 

5,106.50 

26,098.13 

14,626.16 

11,471.97 

19,061.05 

10,915.65 

6,122.80 

1,502.60 

520.00 

6,372.62 

8,082.61 

9,493.23 

23,553.53 

16,224.03 

4,510.00 

2,819.50 

15,659.83 



tOf this sum |154 was paid on salary for 1908. 



Expenditures^ 1908-'09. 



29 



Table V. Spent fob Teaching and Supervision — Continued. 



Cherokee 

Rural 

Andrews 

Murphy 

Chowan 

Rural 

Edenton 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Rural 

Shelby 

Kings Mountain. 

Coluihbus 

Craven 

Rural 

New Bern 

Cumberland 

Rural 

Fayetteville 

Hope Mills 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Rural 

Lexington 

Thomasville 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Rural 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Rural 

Tarboro 

Forsyth 

Rural 

Winston 

Kernersville 



Superin- 
tendents. 



White 
Teachers. 



2,031.15 ! $ 

I 
381.15 I 

800.00 ! 

850.00 
1,581.00 

381.00 j 
1,200.00 

150.00 
2,800.00 
1,200.00 

800.00 

800.00 

876.00 
2,500.00 
1,000.00 I 
1,500.00 
2,700.00 ' 
1,200.00 
1,500.00 , 



204.50 

257.50 

3,200.00 

1,200.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

400.00 

544.00 

3,660.00 

1,560.00 

2,100.00 

1,983.37 

tl,083.37 

900.00 

2,646.00 

996.00 

1,650.00 



9,242.97 

4,022.97 

2,870.00 

2,350.00 

6,579.25 

3,949.25 

2,630.00 

2,342.00 

20,836.09 

15,796.09 

2,840.00 

2,200.00 

23,674.18 

17,268.55 

8,912.40 

8,356.15 

22,821.02 

16,491.70 

5,249.93 

1,079.39 

5,790.75 

5,406.61 

17,943.67 

12,775.42 

3,180.00 

1,988.25 

5,548.46 

15,269.07 

51,186.59 

18,398.84 

32,787.75 

16,070.81 

11,940.81 

4,130.00 

34,735.69 

19.025.69 

15,000.00 

710.00 



Polorprl '' Total for 
Teachers. ' Teaching and 
Supervi.sion. 



240.00 
140.00 
100.00 



2,805.56 

2,580.56 

225.00 

80.00 

2,569.20 

2,004.20 

440.00 

125.00 

3,065.68 

5,110.00 

3,350.00 

1,760.00 

5,436.74 

3,885.75 

1,550.99 



1,436.95 

355.50 

2,602.05 

1,522.05 

560.00 

520.00 

1,056.91 

3,981.75 

9,963.25 

2,263.25 

7,700.00 

5,426.80 

4,051.80 

1,375.00 

6,827.63 

3,312.03 

3,240.00 

275.00 



11,514.12 

4,544.12 

3,770.00 

3,200.00 

10,965.81 

6,910.81 

4,055.00 

2,572.00 

26,205.29 

19,000.29 

4,080.00 

3,125.00 

27,615.86 

24,878.55 

13,262.40 

11,616.15 

30,957.76 

21,577.45 

8,300.92 

1,079.39 

7,432.20 

6,019.61 

23,745.72 

15,497.47 

4,740.00 

3,508.25 

7,005.37 

19,794.82 

64,809.84 

22,222.09 

42,587.75 

23,480.98 

17,075.98 

6,405.00 

44,209.32 

23,334.32 

19,890.00 

985.00 



tPaid from public high school fund. 
JOnly a part of annual salary. 



30 



Expenditures, 1908-'09. 



Table V. Spent for Teaching and Supervision — Continued. 



Franklin 

Rural 

Franklinton 

Louisburg 

Youngs ville.^ 

Gaston 

Rural 

Gastonia 

Cherry ville 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford 

Rural 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Guilford College _ 

Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck 

Weldon 

Enfield 

Roanoke Rapids. 

Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville, _ 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Rural 

Swan Quarter 



Superin- 
tendents. 



White 
Teachers. 



4,325.04 

900.00 

1,575.04 

1,100.00 

750.00 

3,470.00 

1,300.00 

1,500.00 

670.00 

436.50 

375.00 

2,200.00 

1,200.00 

1,000.00 

507.00 

5,212.50 

1,800.00 

1,787.50 

1,625.00 



5,671.57 

1,121.57 

1,050.00 

1,500.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

1,971.61 

1,021.61 

950.00 

1,600.00 

600.00 

1,000.00 

1,680.00 

680.00 

1,000.00 

575.00 

345.60 

34*5.60 



13,762.67 

9,742.67 

1,200.00 

2,160.00 

660.00 

28,365.42 

20,376.67 

6,539.00 

1,449.75 

5,404.38 

3,058.50 

16,113.71 

12,280.37 

3,833.34 

4,626.61 

56,813.82 

29,392.28 

17,769.04 

8,602.50 

1,050.00 

22,111.76 

12,788.12 

3,330.00 

2,843.64 

1,910.00 

1,240.00 

16,489.16 

13,693.91 

2,795.25 

17,799.55 

13,427.05 

4,372.50 

11,175.00 

9,400.00 

1,775.00 

5,069.48 

4,194.69 

2,994.69 

1,200.00 



Colored 
Teachers. 



Total for 
Teaching and 
Supervision. 



4,780.40 $ 

3,205.40 ' 
400.00 I 
900.00 I 
275.00 

3,191.24 

2,191.24 

1,000.00 



2,332.41 



5,202.08 
4,167.08 
1,035.00 
1,917.10 
9,865.57 
4,385.57 
2,990.00 
2,490.00 



9,468.71 

7,759.96 

450.00 

618.75 

440.00 

200.00 

1,491.49 

1,491.49 



753.00 



753.00 
1,390.00 
950.00 
440.00 
3,283.95 
2,066.55 
2,066.55 



22,868.11 

13,848.07 

3,175.04 

4,160.00 

1,685.00 

35,026.66 

23,867.91 

9,039.00 

2,119.75 

8,173.29 

3,433.50 

23,515.79 

'17,647.45 

5,868.34 

7,050.71 

71,891.89 

35,577.85 

22,546.54 

12,717.50 

1,050.00 

37,252.04 

21,669.65 

4,830.00 

4,962.39 

3,350.00 

2,440.00 

19,952.26 

16,207.01 

3,745.25 

20,152.55 

14,027.05 

6,125.50 

14,245.00 

11,030.00 

3,215.00 

8,928.43 

6,606.84 

5,406.84 

1,200.00 



Expenditures^ 1908-'09. 



31 



Table V. Spent fob Teaching and Supervision — Continued. 



Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville. 
Statesville. 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

Smithfield . . 

Jones 



Lee. 



Rural 

Sanford 

Lenoir 

Rural 

Kinston 

LaGrange 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincolnton 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Rural 

Williamston.. 
Robersonville _ 

McDowell 

Rural 

Marion 

Mecklenburg 

Rural 

Charlotte 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Rural 

Troy 



Superin- 
tendents. 



White 
Teachers. 



3,100.00 ! 

600.00 I 
1,000.00 
1,500.00 

351.50 
2,935.30 ! 
1,083.30 I 

852.00 ' 
1,000.00 I 

320.65 1 
1,602.60 

402.60 
1,200.00 
2,301.40 
1,101.00 
1,200.40 



1,729.00 
729.00 

1,000.00 
300.00 
465.00 

1,425.00 

975.00 

150.00 

*400.00 

1,410.00 
600.00 
810.00 

3,775.00 

1,375.00 

2,400.00 
290.00 
778.75 
138.75 
640.00 



21,892.33 

14,350.93 

2,860.00 

4,681.40 

9,830.55 

25,067.57 

21,580.07 

1,890.00 

1,597.50 

5,740.96 

7,618.27 

5,198.27 

2,420.00 

20,599.79 

9,278.86 

9,560.93 

1,760.00 

12,823.70 

9,408.60 

3,415.10 

9,784.85 

9,185.28 

9,819.01 

6,949.01 

1,710.00 

1,160.00 

10,982.47 

8,367.47 

2,615.00 

57,343.35 

22,301.63 

35,041.72 

8,796.00 

7,667.49 

6,827.49 

840.00 



Colored 
Teachers. 



Total for 

Teaching and 

Supervision. 



3,989.86 

2,625.86 

544.00 

820.00 

418.70 

4,791.94 

3,876.94 

450.00 

465.00 

2,097.50 

1,627.82 

1,627.82 



3,842.24 

2,532.24 

1,025.00 

285.00 

1,385.05 

945.05 

440.00 

322.50 

287.83 

4,244.33 

3,304.33 

640.00 

240.00 

1,110.36 

1,110.36 



10,328.33 
4,128.83 
6,199.50 

301.94 
2,082.06 
1,582.06 

500.00 



28,982.19 

17,576.79 

4,404.00 

7,001.40 

10,600.75 

32,794.81 

26,540.31 

3,192.00 

3,062.50 

8,159.11 

10,848.69 

7,228.69 

3,620.00 

26,743.43 

12,912.10 

11,786.33 

2,045.00 

15,937.75 

11,082.65 

4,855,10 

10,407.35 

9,938.11 

15,488.34 

11,288.34 

2,400.00 

1,800.00 

13,502.83 

10,077.83 

3,425.00 

71,446.68 

27,805.46 

43,641.22 

9,387.94 

10,528.30 

8,548.30 

1,980.00 



♦Salary S900, of which $500 was paid from public high school fund. 

tPaid from public high school fund. 

jSalary $800. Balance paid from public high school fund. 



32 



Expenditures, 1908-'09. 



Table V. Spext for Teaching and Supervision — Continued. 



Moore 

Rural 

Southern Pines 

Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount . 
Spring Hope.- 

New Hanover 

Rural 

Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Rural 

Elizabeth City. 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 

Person 

Rural 

Roxboro 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville 

Polk 

Randolph 

Rural 

Ashboro 

Randleman 

Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham . . 
Hamlet 



Superin- 
tendents. 




Colored 
Teachers. 



2,100.00 % 
1,200.00 

900.00 
3,438.54 
1,138.54 
1,500.00 

800.00 ^ 
2,520.00 j 

720.00 ' 
1,800.00 
1,155.00 

900.00 

725.00 

421.77 
2,300.00 

500.00 
1,800.00 

600.00 
1,328.00 

228.00 
1,100.00 
1,253.15 

453.15 

800.00 
2,700.00 
1,500.00 
1,200.00 

353.00 
2,169.25 

769.25 

800.00 

600.00 
2,918.00 

908.00 
1,200.00 

810.00 



10,964.23 $ 

9,849.83 

1,114.40 _. 
26,818.33 
14,861.23 
10,494.10 

1,463.00 
24,982.20 

5,092.50 
19,889.70 
10,505.20 
10,278.44 

8,299.00 

5,008.05 
13,880.05 

3,210.25 
10,669.80 

8,560.70 

4,860.17 

3,322.67 

1,537.50 
10,740.00 

7,990,00 

2,750.00 
29,736.55 
24,914.75 

4,821.80 

4,609.70 
17,749.08 
14,349.08 

1,080.00 

1,720.00 
10,166.62 

6,226.62 

2,680.00 

1,260.00 



2,791.91 
2,791.91 



Total for 
Teaching and 
Supervision. 



6,105.40 


4,160.40 


1,745.00 


200.00 


9,389.50 


2,730.00 


6,659.50 


4,984.18 


2,036.73 


2,297.13 


1,638.56 


3,796.35 


1,681.35 


2,115.00 


3,340.25 


2,555.25 


1,955.25 


600.00 


3,098.45 


2,522.45 


576.00 


5,250.75 


4,095.75 


1,155.00 


869.70 


2,244.56 


1,644.56 


600.00 


3,433.49 


2,443.49 


495.00 


495.00 



15,856.14 
13,841.74 

2,014.40 
36,362.27 
20,160.17 
13,739.10 

2,463.00 
36,891.70 

8,542.50 
28,349.20 
16,644.38 
13,215.17 
11,321.13 

7,068.38 
19,976.40 

5,391.60 
14,584.80 
12,500.95 

8,743.42 

5,505.92 

3,237.50 
15,091.60 
10,965.60 

4,126.00 
37,687.30 
30,510.50 

7,176.80 

5,832.40 
22,162.89 
16,762.89 

3,080.00 

2,320.00 

16,518.11 

9,578.11 

4,375.00 
2,565.00 



Expenditures, 1008-'09. 



33 



Table V. Spent for Teaching and Supervision — Continued. 



Robeson 

Rural 

Lumberton 

Maxton 

Rockingham 

Rural 

Reidsville 

Ruffln 

Madison 

Rowan 

Rural 

Salisbury 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Rural 

Albemarle 

Stokes 

Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy 

Pilot Mountain. 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Rural 

Monroe 

Vance 

Rural 

Henderson 

Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 



Superin- 
tendents. 



3,575.00 
1,475.00 
1,200.00 
900.00 
3,500.00 
1,500.00 
1,200.00 



White 
Teachers. 



Colored 

Teachers. 



800.00 

2,422.00 

1,150.00 

1,272.00 

800.00 

1,550.00 

750.00 

800.00 

429,63 

969.70 

289.70 

680.00 

600.00 

2,105.00 

620.00 

1,485.00 



350.00 

494.75 

78.00 

2,100.00 

600.00 

1,500.00 

2,750.00 

1,000.00 

1,750.00 

3,895.84 

1,895.84 

2,000.00 



27,597.96 

23,390.46 

2,677.50 

1,530.00 

19,547.32 

12,777.32 

4,090.00 

1,300.00 

1,380.00 

30,060.76 

18,682.76 

11,378.00 

13,533.98 

17,704.26 

16,264.26 

1,440.00 

4,778.11 

12,043.46 

9,776.21 

2,267.25 

9,642.19 

18,596.81 

12,996.81 

4,950.00 

650.00 

7,131.42 

7,196.93 

3,615.58 

23,826.25 

18,386.25 

5,440.00 

15,592.49 

t8,733.99 

0,858.50 

42,385.75 

20,887.74 

21,498.01 



Total for 

Teaching and 

Supervision. 



12,290.89 

11,453.39 

550.00 

287.50 

5,016.96 

3,256.96 

1,360.00 

400.00 
5,794.28 
4,444.28 
1,350.00 
1,602.23 
4,579.72 
4,009.72 

570.00 
2,812.21 

724.49 

724.49 



798.45 

1,477.20 

945.20 

532.00 



183.05 

501.41 

744.31 

4,813.00 

4,093.00 

720.00 

4,282.53 

2,167.53 

2,115.00 

12,090.71 

5,986.33 

6,104.38 



43,463.85 

*36,318.85 

4,427.50 

2,717.50 

28,064.28 

17,534.28 

6,650.00 

1,300.00 

2,580.00 

38,277.04 

24,277.04 

14,000.00 

15,936.21 

23,833.98 

21,023.98 

2,810.00 

8,019.95 

13,737.65 

10,790.40 

2,947.25 

11,040.64 

22,179.01 

14,562.01 

6,967.00 

650.00 

7,664.47 

8,193.09 

4,437.89 

30,739.25 

23,079.25 

7,660.00 

22,625.02 

11,901.52 

10,723.50 

58,372.30 

28,769.91 

29,602.39 



*0f this sum S3,415.07 was paid for Croatan Indian schools. 

tOf this sum $180 was paid for conveying pupils to and from school. 



Part II— 3 



34 



ExPE2v-DITUKES, 1908-'09. 



Table V. Spent for Teaching and Supervision — Continued. 



Superin- 
tendents. 



WTiite 
Teachers. 



Teaohirs Teaching and 
leacheib. Supervision. 



Warren 

Washington 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive 

Fremont 

Wilkes 

Rural 

Wilkesboro 

North Wilkesboro 

Wilson 

Rural 

Wilson City • 

Lucama *. 

Yadkin I 

I 
Yancey 

North Carolina 

Rural 

aty 



550.00 

1,962.00 

262.00 

800.00 

900.00 

300.00 

4,400.00 

900.00 

1,600.00 ! 

1,000.00 

900.00 ! 

2,531.00 

831.00 

700.00 

1,000.00 

2,400.00 

1,000.00 

tl,400.00 : 



400.00 
249.00 



8,621.00 S 

5,666.50 

3,476.50 
750.00 

1,440.00 

7,126.15 I 
27,241.34 
12,669.25 
11.442.09 

1,600.00 

1,530.00 
20,316.27 
17,281.27 

1,075.00 . 

1,960.00 
22,754.37 
13,449.37 

8,505.00 
800.00 

8,638.83 

5,845.00 



3,769.00 

2,362.50 

1,612.50 

300.00 

450.00 

170.00 

8,267.40 

3,736.00 

3,269.40 

905.00 

357.00 

2,165.58 

1,965.58 



200.00 

7,635.99 

4,277.49 

3,178.50 

180.00 

596.25 

200.00 



166,903.89 
71,910.32 
94,993.51 



1,486,998.26 

1,037,442.78 

449,555.48 



321,034.45 

227,512.98 

93,521.47 



12,940.00 

9,991.00 

5,351.00 

1,850.00 

2,790.00 

7,596.15 

39,903.74 

17,305.25 

16,311.49 

3,505.00 

2,787.00 

25,012.85 

20,077.85 

1,775.00 

3,160.00 

32,790.36 

18,726.86 

13,083.50 

980.00 

9,635.08 

6,294.00 



1,974,936.60 

1,336,866.08 

638,170.52 



*Paid from public high school fund. 
tSalary, $1,500.00. 



Expenditures, 1908-'09. 



35 



TABLE VI. SPENT FOR BUILDINGS AND SUPPLIES, 1908-'09. 

This table shows what was spout for the following : Fuel and janitors, fur- 
niture, libraries, supplies, schoolhouses (white), schoolhouses (colored), insur- 
ance and rent, and interest and sinking-fund account. 

- Summary of Table VI and Comparison with 1907-'0S. 



Fuel and janitors, 1908-09 

Fuel and janitors, 1907-08 

Increase 

Furniture, 1908-09 

Furniture, 1907-08 

Increase 

Libraries, 1908-'09 

Libraries, 1907-08 

Increase. 

Supplies, 1908-09 

Supplies, 1907-08 

Increase 

Houses (white), 1908-09 

Houses (white), 1907-08 

Increase 

Houses (colored) , 1908-'09 

Houses (colored) , 1907-08 

Increase 

Insurance and rent, 1908-'09 

Insurance and rent, 1907-08 

Increase 

Interest, loan fund, etc., 1908-09 ^. 

Interest, loan fund, etc., 1907-08 

J Increase 

Total for buildings and supplies, 1908-09 

Total for buildings and supplies, 1907-08 

Increase 

Percentage for buildings and supplies, 1908-'09 
Percentage for buildings and supplies, 1907-08 

Increase 



Rural. 


City. 


North 
Carolina. 


$ 27,744.17 


$ 54,997.03 


$ 82,741.20 


27,774.58 


51,335.37 


79,109.95 


*30.41 


3,661.66 


3,631.25 


46,119.07 


18,824.18 


64,943.25 


,_ 38, 473. 27 


28,918.49 


67,391.76 


7,645.80 


*10,094.31 


2,448.51 


12,662.84 


1,326.13 


13,988.97 


12,370.67 


1,954.28 


14,324.95 


292.17 


*628.15 


*335.98 


8,562.02 


19,330.18 


27,892.20 


8,404.55 


17,370.59 


25,775.14 


157.47 


1,959.59 


2,117.06 


254,590.89 


134,875.60 


389,466.49 


294,503.64 


182,727.72 


477,231.36 


*39,912.75 


*47,852.12 


*87,764.87 


25,056.90 


12,187.19 


37,244.09 


29,372.84 


23,447.50 


52,820.34 


*4,315.94 


*11,260.31 


*15,576.25 


8,536.76 


7,136,63 


15,673.39 


8,764.56 


5,823.25 


14,587.81 


*227.80 


1,313.38 


1,085.58 


51,546.33 


28,344.04 


79,890.37 


43,929.86 


29,416.61 


3,346.47 


7,616.47 


*1,072.57 


6,543.90 


434,818.98 


277,020.98 


711,839.96 


463,593.97 


340,993.81 


804,587.78 


*28,774.99 


*63,972.83 


*92,747.82 


21.4 


26.6 


23.2 


24.7 


31.5 


27.2 


*3.3 


*4.9 


*4.0 



♦Decrease. 



36 



Expenditures, 1908-'09. 



Table VI. Spent for Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 



Fuel 

and 

Janitors. 



Alamance 

Rural 

Burlington.. 

Graham 

Haw River. 

Mebane 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Rural 

Wadesboro. 

Ashe 

Beaufort 

Rural 

Washington. 

Belhaven 

Bertie 

Rural 

Aulander 

Windsor 

Bladen 

Brunswiclv 

Buncombe 

Rural 

Asheville 

Burke 

Rural 

Morganton.. 

Cabarrus 

Rural 

Concord 

Caldwell 

Rural 

Lenoir 

Granite 

Rhodhiss 



$3,609.21 
23.5.03 
2,796.59 
348.89 
136.45 
92.25 
310.61 



Furni- 
ture. 



441.21 

241.21 

200.00 

112.68 

1,373.84 

325.49 

926.35 

122.00 

642.98 

331.53 

40.00 

271.45 

31.32 

3.47 

4,558.26 

1,011.48 

3,546.78 

641.60 

128.39 

513.21 

1,770.18 

414.94 

1,355.24 

732.43 

47.57 

670.79 

14.07 



$1,117.54 
843.74 

40.69 

100.00 

4.45 

128.66 

196.76 

67.30 
442.59 
392.59 

50.00 
139.18 
616.33 

21.50 

435.98 

158.85 

1,073.39 

351.26 



Sup- 
plies. 



171.96 
129.98 



24.00 
17.98 



69.37 
73.30 
5^25 
2.25 
50.00 



493.53 

8.60 

397.62 

87.31 

388.09 



722.13 
463.68 
232.98 
3,156.40 
1,723.95 
1,432.45 
833.09 
274.70 
558.39 
895.22 
618.87 
276.35 
737.31 
402.53 
334.78 



388.09 



12.65 

1,260.69 

259.41 

1,001.28 

200.26 

35.54 
164.72 
403.21 
168.75 
234.46 

95.38 



92.10 



3.28 



Libra- 
ries. 



$ 399.79 
351.87 



47.92 



20.00 
105.00 
105.00 



210.00 
491.50 
240.00 
251.50 



15.00 
15.00 



165.00 



580.01 

185.48 

394.53 

40.00 

40.00 



135.10 
135.10 



50.00 
50.00 



Insur- 
ance 
and 
Rent. 



93.26 
76.07 



11.00 
6.19 



60.24 

22.74 

37.50 

25.00 

269.50 

27.50 

42.00 

200.00 

153.10 

85.60 

20.00 

47.50 

6.00 

15.00 

330.10 

330.10 



Interest 

on 
Loans, 
Install- 
ments, 

etc. 



New 

Buildings, 

White. 



$1,858.40 
1,542.40 



82.50 

60.00 

22.50 

172.50 

85.00 

87.50 

110.00 

110.00 



194.15 
121.85 



503.30 

1,562.24 

564.24 

1,000.00 

282.80 

912.00 

852.00 

60.00 



714.00 

64.00 

350.00 

300.00 

379.72 

125.60 

1,977.10 

1,695.60 

281.50 

1,450.94 

357.44 

1,093.50 

1,069.92 

1,069.92 



1,397.20 
512.20 
884,00 

1.00 



3,462.89 

1,792.85 

1,351.86 

38.65 

21,19 

258.34 

1,466.94 

1,095.37 

5,985.23 

2,985.23 

3,000.00 

603.73 

994.73 

826.76 

167.97 



2,273.11 
1,137.96 



1,135.15 

4,892.67 

906.34 

22,924.62 

7,211.29 

15,713.33 

410.30 

271.30 

139.00 

5,565.27 

1,668.28 

1,896.99 

3,058.19 

2,159.44 

898.75 



New 
Build- 
ings, i 
Colored. 



Total. 



118.70 
118.70 



230.00 



838.30 
838.30 



2.80 
89.41 
74.67 
14.74 



523.12 
523.12 



210.47 
240.55 
385.18 



385.18 
4.00 



4.00 
390.14 
390.14 



87.67 
87.67 



$10,831.75 

5,090.64 

4,189.14 

764.61 

308.11 

479.25 

2,273.68 

1,759.27 

9,487.06 

5,149.56 

4,337.50 

1,376.19 

5,240.84 

2,376.52 

2,296.16 

568.16 

5,782.79 

2,508.47 

410 00 

2,864.32 

6,148.86 

1,536.59 

35,172.36 

12,417.31 

22,755.05 

3,662.69 

1,167.37 

2,495.32 

8,401.54 

4,551.00 

3,850.54 

6,268.18 

3,369.41 

2,880.42 

18.35 



EXPENDITUKES, 1908-'09. 



37 



Table VI. Spent for Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 





Fuel 

and 

Janitors. 


Furni- 
ture. 


Sup- 
plies. 


Libra- 
ries. 


Insur- 
ance 
and 
Rent. 


Interest 

on 
Loans, 
Install- 
ments, 

etc. 


New 

Buildings, 

White. 

i 
1 


New 
Build- 
ings, 
Colored. 


Total. 


Camden 


$ 80.50 


$ 77.34 


$ 32.50 


$ 90.00 


$ -- 


S- 


$ 265.03 


$ 66.25 


$ 611.62 


Carteret 

Caswell 


84 43 


444 13 


20 00 


60 00 


28.50 


362.60 


3,902.86 




4,902.52 


96.75 

i 

937.64 


232.42 
290.19 


77.78 
358.14 


100.42 
75.00 


67.00 
147.65 


406.50 
1,376.24 


57.80 
4,273.36 ' 


340.30 
07.84 


1,378.97 


Catawba 


7,576.06 


Rural 


454.92 


260.54 


241.28 


75.00 


54.80 ! 


775.12 


3,855.68 


67.84 


5,785.18 


Hickory 


323 75 ' 




87.46 




2,25 


54.00 


229.73 




697.19 


208 97 


29 65 


29 40 




90.60 


547.12 


187.95 




1,093.69 


Chatham 


335.26 


305.72 


14.37 


95.00 


102.31 


748.40 


1,587.07 


279.96 


3,468.09 




420.00 




148.19 
98.19 
30.00 


45.00 
15.00 
15.00 


5.00 
5.00 


885.60 
885.60 


1,055.35 
964.35 




2,559.14 


Rural 






1,968.14 




300 00 






345.00 


Murphy 


120 00 




20.00 


15.00 






91.00 




246.00 


610 59 


576 06 


143 59 


60.00 


50.00 




476.67 


232.47 


2,149.38 


Rural 


369 32 


498 49 


85 32 


60.00 






156.57 


232.47 


1,402.17 


TT.Hpntnn 


241 27 


77 57 


58 27 




50.00 




320.10 




747.21 


Clav 


5.94 
1,246.35 




15.00 
221.39 






80.80 
637.67 


331.25 
2,814.47 




432.99 


Cleveland 


1,061.17 


45.02 


120.13 


31.50 


6,177.70 


Rural 


802.35 


986.17 


121.39 


15.02 


90.13 


637.67 


2,384.47 


1.50 


5,038.70 


Shelby 

Kings Mountain 
Columbus 


400.00 
44 00 




50.00 
50 00 


30.00 






380.00 
50.00 


30.00 


890.00 


75 00 


30 00 




249.00 


166.89 


1,069.32 




42.00 


9.90 


1,520.05 


5,247.58 


412.41 


8,468.15 


Craven 


1,008.47 


521.96 


324.13 


390.00 


42.00 


290.70 


17,094.78 


1,005.77 


20,677.81 


Rural 


110.52 


364.28 


185.79 


390.00 


7.00 


280.20 


1,353.08 


571.66 


3,262.53 


New Bern 


897.95 


157.68 


138.34 




35.00 


10.50 


15,741.70 


434.11 


17,415.28 


Cumberland 


603.97 


1,513.88 


239.16 


120.00 


751.57 


1,322.33 


4,504.70 


1,124.00 


10,179.61 


Rural 


187.00 


1,229.73 


171.02 


120.00 


76.80 


322.90 


4,504.70 


795.71 


7,407.86 


Fayetteville 

Hope Mills 

Currituck 


344.12 

79 85 


244 16 


22 70 




44 77 


999 43 




328.29 


1,983.47 


! 39 99 


45 44 




630 00 








788.28 


.54.00 


606.25 


8.50 


42.00 


33.00 


458.20 


722.29 


137.20 


2,061.44 


Dare 






209.57 
249 02 


5.00 


90.00 
133.50 


292.88 
1,024.00 


148.91 
570.35 




746.30 




1 369 57 


1 

1,054.48 
411.24 


58.32 


4,459.24 


Rural 


703 96 


88.. 56 




7.50 


524.00 


570.35 


58.32 


2,363.93 


Lexington 


1 

470.85 
194.76 
174 14 


575 40 


91 45 


1 


15 40 








1,153.10 


67 84 


69 01 




110.60 


500.00 






942.21 




95 34 


7 30 


255.00 


1 

! 5.00 




986.19 




1,522.97 


Duplin 


233.66 


483.15 


.37.21 


' 75.00 


' 30.00 


1,932.77 


3,824.40 


25.00 


■ 6,641.19 



38 



EXPENDITUEES^ 1908-'09. 



Table VI. Spent for Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 



Fuel 

and 

Janitors. 



Furni- 
ture. 



Sup- 
plies. 



Durham $4,926.82 

Rural I 891.40 

Durham 4,035.42 

Edgecombe ; 1,476.05 

Rural 396.97 

Tarboro ' 1,079.08 

Forsyth ; 3,329.36 

Rural 1 1,199.44 

Winston | 2,072.00 

Kernersville . . . 57 . 92 

Franklin 624.46 

Rural I 80.73 

Franklinton ; 231.74 

Louisburg | 223.19 

Youngsville I 88.80 

Gaston 1,901.95 

Rural 795.40 

Gastonia 1,031.55 

Cherry ville I 75.00 

Gates 266.66 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural . 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford 

Rural ' 1,318.08 

Greensboro 1,563.55 

High Point 

Guilford College 

Halifax 

Rural ' 

Scotland Neck J 

Weldon 

Enfield 

Roanoke Rapids 



615.56 
343.79 
271.77 
194.38 
3,866.66 



899.43 
85.60 
1,643.48 
512.98 
430.40 
314.00 
111.15 
274.95 



$1,865.14 

1,115.25 

749.89 

982.67 I 

347.67 

635.00 

1,100.38 

981.38 

100.00 

; 19.00 

j 1,884.35 

858.42 

125.14 

801.79 

99.00 

4,793.77 

2,438.71 

2,315.06 

40.00 

622.85 

I 11.29 

1,129.05 

1,064.97 

"64.08 

I 379.58 

I 1,516.26 

; 1,370.61 

145.65 



$1,814.99 

236.84 

1,578.15 

I 174.84 

124.84 

50.00 

745.48 

372.48 

373.00 



Libra- 
ries. 



Insur- 
ance 
and 

Rent. 



Interest 

on 
Loans, 
Inst.all- 
ments, 

etc. 



New 

Buildings, 

White. 



New 
Build- 
ings, 
Colored. 



Total. 



378.34 
378.34 

215.26 
211.26 

4.00 
315.00 
315 00 



409.08 
224.03 
185.05 
116.90 
71.90 
45.00 
287.71 
162.71 
125.00 



281.69 
45.74 
26.47 

150.00 

59.48 

1,215.35 

875.46 

319.89 
20.00 
23.35 



152.00 
125 00 



319.82 
138.27 



27.00 

260.25 
260.25 



148.55 

33.00 

181.00 

181.00 



30.00 



105.21 

90.20 

15.01 

61.47 

1,786.20 

224.14 

1,109.96 

452.10 



395.29 
395.29 

80.00 
334.51 
334.51 



57.00 

5.00 

171.55 

1.59.. 30 

12.25 

60.00 

575.28 

436.28 



$ 939.10 

345.00 

594.10 

51.20 

51.20 

548.58 
4.55.20 

93.38 
5,520.88 
193.92 
1,073.71 
2,200.00 
2,053.25 
1,555.00 
1,531.00 

24.00 

223.20 

27.20 

824.06 

681.30 

142.76 

233.20 

2,098.90 

1,642.80 



139.00 



456.10 



$14,422.27 

11,182.47 

3,2.39.80 

4,794.57 

4,549.57 

245.00 

8,214.97 

7,898.14 

240.00 

76.83 

2,266.71 

1,068.36 

394.18 

783.85 

20.32 

2,546.12 

2,372.77 

153.35 

20.00 

1,795.92 

50.00 

12,234.78 

12,174.08 

60.70 

869.16 

7,801.41 

5,068.59 

1,538.73 

1,194.09 



$3,977.34 



3,977.34 

1,222.78 

1,. 197. 78 

25.00 

602.31 

502.31 

100.00 



3,495.62 

124.62 

96.00 

3,275.00 

800.54 

796.54 

4.00 

138.30 



1,384.49 
703.44 
681.05 
45.49 
411.53 
221.97 
189.56 



I 



1,724.76 
j 89.73 

46.96 

, 151.50 

1,436.51 



419.50 
27.50 
79.87 

115.84 
15.10 

181.19 



273.04 
255.00 



18.64 



595.60 
141.29 
208.65 
76.00 
54.00 
115.66 



2,174.25 



420.00 
634.75 
225.00 
904.50 



11,437.10 1,521.40 

630.00 I 508.80 

43.24 \ 

754.20 ! 12.60 

I 

9.66 I 

10,000.00 1,000.00 





.128,733.08 


14,373.33 


14,359.75 


9.034.27 


6,951.19 


2,083.08 


15,143.79 


11,886.66 

1 


3,010.00 


1 247.13 


14, 545.. 53 


2,635.06 


1,947.24 


7,609.38 


2,353.85 


13,253.98 


9,070.13 


4,004.85 


179.00 


3,157.28 


93.49 


16,859.99 


1 15,612.37 


1,247.62 


1 1,923.28 


i 18,390.95 


10,616.98 


4,401.80 


3,286.37 


85.60 


19,787.73 


2,165.30 


1,182.16 

1 


! 1,962.99 

1 


i 566.47 


13,912.81 



Expenditures, 1908-'09. 



39 



Table VI. Spent for Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 



Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn..' 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville . . 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville. 

Hertford.. 

Hyde 

Rural 

Swan Quarter.. 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville 

Statesville 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

Smithfield 

Jones 

Lee 

Rural 

Sanford 

Lenoir 

Rural 

Kinston 

LaGrange 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincolnton 

Macon 

Madison 



Fuel 

and 

Janitors . 



Furni- 
ture. 



$ 480.38 
345.60 
134.78 

1,322.60 



1,322.60 
406.25 
85.00 
321.25 
297.21 
154.47 
154.47 



$ 387.96 

358.44 

29.52 



Sup- 
plies. 



Libra- 
ries. 



$ 61.88 
41.58 
20.30 



45.00 
45.00 



Insur- 
ance 
and 

Rent. 



Interest 

on 
Loans, 
Install- 
ments, 

etc. 



$ 245.20 S2,723.90 
245.20 2,723.90 



5.00 
5.00 



358.76 

330.00 

28.76 

148.30 

85.40 

85.40 



68.85 
45.00 
23.85 
64.17 
4.88 
4.88 



45.00 
45.00 



1,688.33 

525.16 

360.92 

802.25 

45.87 

1,322.30 

1,041.05 

135.50 

145.75 



1,430.67 
1,245.49 
127.98 
57.20 
200.00 
774.32 
656.19 I 
43.50 I 
74.63 i 



509.84 
123.29 
100.00 
286.55 
15.00 
102.95 

83.94 
19.01 



120.00 
30.00 
30.00 



100.00 



100.00 
59.00 
29.00 
30.00 
11.30 



New 

Buildings, 

White. 



I New 
Build- 
ings, 
Colored. 



795.20 
195.20 
600.00 
640.20 
602.40 
37.80 



$ 2,595.37 j $ 785,59 
2,468.55 ' 785.59 

126.82 ! 

1,035.00 [ 15.23 
1,035.00 ! 15.23 



Total. 



245.85 
195.00 



305.30 
305.30 



50.85 
120.00 
300.00 
300.00 



245.36 
41.86 
68.50 
135.00 
104.15 
71.15 
36.05 
13.10 
22.00 



10.75 
10.75 



380.00 
69.00 
311.00 

1,670.14 I 1,423.51 
291.05 278.38 
704.66 89.98 
674.43 ; 1,0.55.15 
791.18 458.19 
312.53 458.19 

478.65 I 

65.70 } 304.98 
15.68 ' 153.65 



58.84 
36.84 
22.00 

290.97 
52.94 

238.03 



20.00 
21.92 
21.92 



1,354.98 
655.82 
175.00 
524.16 
264.00 
1,027.29 
1,027.29 



1,952.74 
1,875.00 
77.74 
1,994.72 
1,911.89 
1,911.89 



246.30 
14.80 
2.31.50 
530.84 
190.63 
190.63 



$7,325.28 
7,013.86 
311.42 
3,273.03 
1,250.43 
2,022.60 
3,777.10 
3,026.20 
750.90 
3,166.54 
2,682.57 
2,682.57 



6,914.37 
4,061.63 



395.58 
385.08 



147.65 

105.00 

42.65 



414.06 

12.11 

401.95' 

9.00 



218.14 
218.14 

300.92 
30.00 



62.75 
39.75 
23.00 

133.12 
74.22 
G.40 
52.50 
43.30 
3.30 
40.00 

101.00 
36.00 



1,070.56 
332.80 
737.76 
548.50 
136.00 

412.50 
740.48 
635.65 
104.83 
322.56 
511.14 



2,852.74 

3,413.67 

5,120.50 

5,077.22 

11.50 

31.78 

1,768.25 

91.82 

75.57 

16.25 

1,434.35 

1,176.43 

90.21 

167.71 

1,151.61 

1,142.61 

9.00 

1,863.49 

5,601.20 



10.50 

30.00 

497.12 

479.62 

3.25 

14.25 

306.23 

23.07 

23.07 



211.09 

207.18 

3.91 



18.61 
18.61 



49.00 



12,784.98 
7,233.33 

832.40 
4,719.25 
4,192.69 
9,215.63 
8,617.42 

290.79 

307.42 
2,094.48 
1,719.71 

609.70 
1,110.01 
5,859.33 
2,321.20 
1,175.84 
2,362.29 
3,835.57 
2,801.14 
1,034.43 
3,007.65 
6,356.67 



40 



EXPEXDITUEES, 1908-'09. 



Table VI. Spent fob Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 



Fuel 

and 

Janitors. 



Martin 

Rural I 

Williamston I 

Robersonville._ 

McDowell 

Rural 

Marion 

Mecklenburg 

Rural 

Charlotte 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Rural 

Troy 

Moore 

Rural 

Southern Pines- 

Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount . . 
Spring Hope.-- 

New Hanover 

Rural 

Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Rural 

Elizabeth City . 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 



Furni- 
ture. 



Sup- 
plies. 



Libra- 
ries. 



Insur- 
ance 
and 

Rent. 



$ 502.44 

165.27 

257.92 

79.25 ^ 

348.80 ' 

97.60 

251.20 

5,678.75 

1,265.19 

4,413.56 

75.00 

65.51 

39.63 

25.88 

265.85 

9.25 

256.60 

1,540.02 

448.42 

982.00 

109.60 

1,646.54 

243.11 

1,403.43 

528.55 



299.84 
144.84 
155.00 



891.08 

632.75 

258.33 

2,013.26 

1,048.79 

964.47 

175.00 

200.00 

50.00 

150.00 

381.84 

210.10 

171.74 

2,234.12 

1,411 36 



S 242.60 $ 285.00 
33.45 285.00 

63.28 

145.87 

219.56 
13.05 
206.51 
1,107.80 
183.19 
924.61 



3.90 



3.90 
85.24 

85.24 

1,473.42 

255.41 



88.30 
105.55 

1,746.00 
364.00 

1,382.00 
132.90 
661.60 
189.83 
471.77 



$ 165.66 

50.16 

115.50 



90.00 
90.00 



190.00 
190.00 



197.80 
56.80 

141.09 
30.80 
30.80 



Interest 
on 



New 



New 



&t- Bmldin^^. ^ Total, 
ments, wmte. colored, 
etc. 



$ 442.23 I $ 



75.00 
25.00 
25.00 



30.00 
66.00 
66.00 



307.85 
307.85 

80.00 
30.00 



809.51 


1,145.99 


50.00 


13 25 


72.02 
4,057.25 




55.32 


30.68 


55.32 


14.73 


30.68 




4,042.52 




183.29 


15.61 




172.25 


229.75 


60.00 


325.22 


11.84 


75.00 


572.08 


19.53 


40.62 


557.39 


245.74 


73.54 


142.02 


24.57 


73.54 


415.37 
1,546.41 


221.17 
79.26 




197.10 


31.26 


10.55 


30.00 


31.26 


10.55 


30.00 



107.00 

1.00 

106.00 

1,694.29 

486.03 

1,198.51 

9.75 

151.90 

72.20 

79.70 



322.23 
120.00 
240.70 
240.70 



949 . 30 
949.30 



492.50 
318.80 
318.80 



582.54 ; 
582.54 I 



1,945.63 
824.54 
750.00 
371.09 



78.95 


721.70 




421.49 




475.76 


105.55 


795.60 


238.45 


1,687.96 


5.25 


92.80 


233.20 


1,595.16 


49.50 


824.43 


236.00 


1,491.24 




128.40 


236.00 


1,362.84 



2,994.13 
2,822.05 
41.50 
130.58 
5,231.84 
4,973.07 

258.77 I 

11,536.72 

10,566.03 

970.69 

815.00 

902.31 

696.84 

205.47 

624.45 

546.03 

78.42 

26,231.47 

6,021.47 

20,210.00 



199.33 

163.82 
35.51 



. 5.20 


5.20 


300.72 


300.72 


20.00 


103.32 


103.32 


739.53 


739.53 



1,490.35 
940.35 
550.00 







1,064.67 


97.53 


885.89 


9.15 


178.78 


88.38 


1,722.79 


321.69 


947.21 


161.28 


1,219.12 


337.61 


1,405.44 


38.05 


37,831.88 


401.93 


747.01 


342.30 


37,084.87 


59.63 


2,128.02 


54.89 


1,077.52 


266.66 


858.14 


259.02 


219.38 


7.64 



$5,131.23 
3,664.59 
990.94 
475.70 
7,224.98 
6,109.17 
1,115.81 

21,807.35 

14,534.02 
7,273.33 
1,682.50 
1,684.84 
1,299.59 
385.25 
3,094.30 
2,390.30 
698.00 

36,689.30 

10,417.58. 

25,696.01 
575.71 
7,103.89 
1,311.08 
5,792.81 
3,572.58 
1,991.98 
2,532.85 
3,082.42 

42,782.89 
1,791.49 

40,991.40 
5,012.51 
3,804.83 
1,507.20 
2,297.63 



Expenditures, 1908-'09. 



41 



Table VI. Spent for Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 



Person 

Rural 

Roxboro 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville. 

Polk 

Randolph 

Rural 

Ashboio 

Randleman 

Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham 

Hamlet 

Robeson 

Rural 

Lumberton 

Maxton 

Rocldngham 

PiUral 

Reidsville 

Ruffin 

Madison 

Rowan 

Rural 

Salisbury 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Rural 

Albemarle 



Fuel 

and. 

Janitors. 



Furni- 
ture. 



$ 37.5.35 

165.58 

209.77 

1,136.60 

621.66 

, 514.94 

! 65.32 

1,011.06 

285.49 

375.57 

350.00 

1 

608.89 

94.50 

t 

I 360.39 

i 150.00 

i 727.39 

., 284.89 

280.50 

162.00 

1,021.46 

250.35 

571.11 

,50.00 

150.00 

1,449.86 

765.86 

684.00 

31.17 

217.01 

141.51 

75.50 

111.75 

354.98 

189.33 

165.65 



Sup- 
plies. 



$ 170.28 

80,05 

90.23 

712.78 

610.18 

102.60 

59.07 

715.28 

580,28 

135.00 

081.49 
405.89 
103.60 
172.00 
1,178.48 
1,178.48 



1,826 20 
1,826.20 



$ 2.52.68 

127.60 

125.08 

1,354.15 

883.35 

470.80 

3.00 

37.65 



Libra- 
ries. 



Insur- 
ance 
and 
Rent. 



Interest 

on 
Loans, 
Install- 
ments, 

etc. 



$ 105.59 $ 28.00 $ 



906.11 
906.11 

182.61 
677.31 
677.31 



117.81 
117.81 



12.31 

25.34 

323.03 

20.62 

293.16 

9.25 

310.55 

185.55 

100.00 

25.00 

661.71 

280.16 

156.55 

200.00 

25.00 

76.00 

60.00 

16.00 

10.55 

258.56 

166.95 

91.61 



119.53 



105.59 



28.00 



110.00 


415.18 


110.00 


326.98 




88.20 


231.28 


714.50 


187.00 


25.00 


44.28 


689.50 



1,650.04 
1,650.04 



129.96 

89.96 

30.00 

10.00 

270.00 

270.00 



94.10 
94.10 



60.90 

2,066.35 

1,682.20 

9.15 

375.00 

830.45 

530.45 



770.94 
670.94 
100.00 



300.00 
1,265.80 
1,090.80 



90.00 681.58 

90.00 I 556.58 

125.00 



175.00 
637.50 



New ^'^^ 

Buildings, I ^"i^*^" 
Whitp ings, 

vvnite. I Colored. 



$ 83.40 
83.40 



$ 28.14 
28.14 



473.80 
473.80 



5,835.43 
4,740.29 
1,095.14 

537.29 17.24 

6, .577. 61 I 233.52 
6,577.61 233.52 



3,849.66 
1,305.71 
2,193.95 
350.00 
5,915.51 
5,375.26 



753.33 

708.35 

34.98 

10.00 

1,037.03 

tl,027.03 



637.50 



15.00 
15.00 



172.95 
172.95 



896.25 
896.25 



135.00 320.60 590.85 
465.85 I 130.35 j 688.38 
465.85 i 130.35 ' 688.38 



30.00 I 27.85 
30.00 ( 20.35 
' 7.50 



' 119.53 

tOf this sura ?414.22 was paid for Croatan Indian .schools. 



672.42 
498.88 
173.54 



540.25 
6,932.67 

6,832.67 
100.00 



10.00 
272.13 
187.83 

84.30 



3,328.04 
3,328.04 



501.87 
501.87 



1,187.51 193.49 
4,275.76 , 790.85 
4,275,76 790.85 



Total. 




$1,043.44 

618.36 

425.08 

11,687.98 

9, 416.. 30 

2,271.68 

742.82 

11,587.25 

9,571.10 

1,205.81 

750.34 

7,266.91 

3,249.58 

3,016.08 

1,001.25 

11,475.70 

10.082.95 

480.50 

912.25 

12,123.25 

10,023.79 

1,674.46 

250.00 

175.00 

7,346.08 

6,646.08 

700.00 

2,651.78 

7,504.07 

7,336.96 

167.11 

1,625.98 

3,941.34 

2,475.12 

1,466.22 



42 



Expenditures^ 1908-'09. 



Table VI. Spent for Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 



Fuel 

and 

Janitors. 



Stokes 

Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy 

Pilot Mountain, 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Rural 

Monroe 

Vance 

Rural 

Henderson 

Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Rural - 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive 

Fremont 

Wilkes 

Rural 

Wilkesboro 

N. Wilkesboro ^ 



$ 138.17 

731.71 

112.27 

554.23 

65.21 

311.62 

230.75 

73.28 

624.23 

203.42 

420.81 

1,172.62 

373.55 

799.07 

4,687.36 

1,171.01 

3,516.35 

100.26 

157.38 

157.38 



Furni- 
ture. 



$ 446.57 
444.95 
444.95 



Sup- 
plies. 



169.99 
827.. 57 

29.35 
269.23 
201.35 

67.88 
190.36 
190.36 



8.90 
8.90 



36.15 



337.03 



1,213.19 
1,181.19 
32.00 
69.20 
27.00 
27.00 



337.03 

341.80 

44.32 

297.48 

590.33 

325.00 

265.33 

29.60 

61.26 

47.86 



Libra- 
ries. 



Insur- 
ance 
and 
Rent. 



Interest 

on ' ^ New 

^^- I ^IS^^H Init Total, 
ments, j ^nite. j colored, 
etc. ! 



$ 90.00 S- 
59.99 
59.99 i 



160.00 



130.00 
120.00 
10.00 
194.45 
194.45 



S 377.46 $ 

47.10 1,684.10 i 

22.00 934.10 

11.00 750.00 

14.10 

I 
71.50 ; 544.40 i 

21.60 i 584.40 ! 



315.00 
265.00 
50.00 
60.00 
10 00 
10.00 



174 . 30 
106.80 

67.50 
204.30 
155.35 

48.95 

1,244.46 

995.41 



340 10 

295.90 

44.20 



1,175.00 
5,422.98 
4,192.87 
1,130.11 

100.00 

440.97 
2,467.04 

882.29 
1,021.39 

999.99 

21.40 

1,655.78 

1,655.78 



$ 02.15 
50 . 45 
56.45 



2,325.23 
16.67 



249.05 2,308.56 
22.00 ; 680.00 
56.25 ' 248.00 

188.00 



16,284.86 

14,492.01 

1,792.85 

1,587.09 

86.74 

86.74 



8.04 

3.04 

20.00 

81.83 

79.43 

2.40 I 

189.88 

58.28 j 

131.60 

983.48 

687.31 

296.17 

480.91 i 

28.70 

28.70 



$2,289.35 
8,456.18 
5,831.53 
2,445.34 

179.31 
1,546.52 
4,330.55 
1,004.92 
2,978.11 
2,006.89 

971.22 
3,949.19 
2,672.09 
1,277.10 
27,643.91 
19,133.60 
8,510.31 
3,029.06 

675.33 

545.68 



13.40 



I 6.00 

2,035.87 J 2,389.49 

731.27 I 1,. 592. 76 

1,160.60 i 49.28 



497.61 

29.19 

3,35.26 



90.00 
367.45 
177.69 
189.76 



56.25 60.00 
-i 154.08 

! 

233.40 , 1,886.08 

94.95 1,353.50 



25.15 



532.58 



346.75 

6,249.76 

3,364.73 

26.97 



129.65 

.._ I 596.83 

827.95 14,487.61 

805.55 8,149.64 

22.40 : 2,342.00 



144.00 
324.21 
134.21 
65.00 
125.00 



747.45 
495.94 
376.94 



133.16 

209,96 

187.92 

22.04 



119.00 



I 113.30 

1,175.00 26.00 

1,170.00 

: 26.00 

5.00 



744.04 
744.04 



1,000.00 j.. ..] 1,000.00 

1,858.06 I -! 2,995.97 

3,530.77 I 63.55 6,569.47 

3.139.77 63.55 5,816.43 

6.00 119.04 

385.00 634.00 



Expenditures^ 1908-'09. 



43 



Table VI. Spent for Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 



Fuel 

and 

Janitors. 



Wilson $2,233.00 

Rural ; 708.81 

Wilson City I 1,449.19 

Lucama , 75.00 

Yadldn \ 236.65 

Yancey 

North Carolina ..82,741.20 



Furni- 
ture. 



Sup- 
plies. 



$1,393.86 
872.77 
521.09 



Libra- 
ries. 



50.00 
5.00 



$ 961.83 I $ 160.00 
510.69 I 120.00 
451.14 I 

_: 40.00 

53.21 240.00 



Insur- 
ance 
and 

Rent. 



$ 126.00 
27.00 
99.00 



Interest 

on 
Loans, 
Install- 
ments, 

etc. 



$1,120.54 
464.00 
656.54 



10.00 
4.50 



158.48 
223.00 



New- 
Buildings, 
White. 



64,943.25 27, 892. 20 13,988.97 15,673.39 79,890.37 

Rural 27,744.17 46,119.07 j 8,562.02 112,662.84 8,536.76 J51,546.33 

City '54,997.03 18,824.18 !l9,330.18 I 1,326.13 7,1.36.63 28,344.04 



$ 5,953.30 

5,835.30 

103.00 

15.00 

591.49 

836.76 



New 
Build- 
ings, 
Colored. 



Total. 



$1,413.82 $13,362.35 



1,379.92 
33.90 



135.00 
10.00 



9,918.49 
3,313.80 
130.00 
1,474.83 
1,079.26 



389,466.49 137,244.09 711,839.96 



254,590.89 
134,875.60 



25,056.90 |434,818.98 
12,187.19 277,020.98 



44 



ExPEIs-DITUEES, 1908-'09. 



TABLE VII. SPENT FOR ADMINISTRATION, ETC., 1908-'09. ' 

This table shows what was paid for the admiuistration of the school fuud — 
treasurer, board of education, committeemen, taking school census, errors, over- 
charges and borrowed money, and all other expenses. 

Summary of Table VII and Compaeison with 1907-'08. 



Rural. 



City. 



North Carolina. 



Treasurer, 1908- '09 

Treasurer, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Board of Education, 1908-'09 

Board of Education, 1907-'O8 

Increase 

Taking census and committeemen, 1908-'09 — 
Taking census and committeemen, 1907-'08 — 

Increase 

Other expenses, 1908-'09 

Other expenses, 1907-'08 - 

Increase 

Total for administration, 1908- '09 

Total for administration, 1907-'08t 

Increase 

Percentage spent for administration, 1908-'09 
Percentage spent for administration, 1907-'08 

Increase 



40.347.79 
37,793.84 
2, 553. 95 
19,342.18 
18,384.35 
957. 83 
10,760.22 
10,270.27 

489.95 

i 

22,049.21 
34,228.75 
*12, 179.54 
92,499.40 
100,677.21 
*8,177.81 
4.6 
t5.4 
* _s 



6,834.50 

5,617.64 

1,216.86 

60.88 

51.92 

8.96 

1,211.83 

1,956.09 

*744.26 

15, 053. 63 

13,937.94 

1,115.69 

23,160.84 

21,563.59 

1,597.25 

2.2 

tl.9 

* .3 



47,182.29 

43,411.48 

3,770.81 

19,403.06 

18,436.27 

966.79 

11,972.05 

12,226.36 

*254.31 

37,102.84 

48,166.69 

*11.063.85 

115,660.24 

122, 240. 80 

*6, 580.56 

3.8 

t4.1 

• .3 



Alamance 

Rural 

Burlington - 

Graham 

Haw River - 

Mebane 

Alexander -— 
Alleghany — 

Anson-. 

Rural 

Wadesboro - 



Treasurer. 



652.36 
627.36 



25.00 



206.37 
149.64 
500.46 
389. 66 
110.80 



Board of ' S^"^"f,f"^ All Other 

Education. Conimittee- Expenses. 

men. 



I 



211.81 

150. 93 

29.70 

20.98 

10.20 



95. 55 
147.82 
253.10 
253. 10 



353.51 
52.26 



Total for 
Administra- 
tion. 



287.58 

4.91 

8.76 

63.20 

58.24 

150. 70 

137. 70 

13.00 



103. 00 
103.00 



213.88 
469.68 
148.92 
320. 76 



1,320.68 

933.55 

29.70 

333. 56 

15.11 

8.76 

365. 12 

569.58 

1,373.94 

929.38 

444.56 



* Decrease. 

tThis item represents actual administration expenses. Borrowed money, etc., has been sub- 



tracted. 



EXPENDITUEES, 1908-'09. 



45 



Table VII. Spent for Administration— Continwcd. 



Ashe 

Beaufort 

Rural 

Washington 
Belhaven — 

Bertie 

Rural 

Aulander -- 
Windsor — 

Bladen 

Brunswick — 
Buncombe — 

Rural 

Asheville -- 

Burke 

Rural 

Morganton - 

Cabarrus 

Rural 

Concord 

Caldwell 

Rural 

Lenoir 

Granite 

Rhodhiss-— 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Rural 

Hickory 

Newton 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Rural 

Andrews — 
Murphy 



Treasurer. 



Board of 
Education. 



294.35 

551.25 

500. 00 

51.25 



Census and 
Committee- 
men. 



132.80 $ 
303. 72 
303.72 



All Other 
Expenses. 



384.27 
384.27 



84.15 
84.15 



53.94 I $ 
160.16 
145.16 

15.00 



Total for 
Administra- 
tion. 



91.62 
91.62 



11.50 $ 492.59 
530.86 1,545.99 



87.76 
443.10 



159.09 
159.09 



462.99 
257. 12 
1,285.55 
562.22 
723.33 
338-98 
188. 98 
150.00 
568.66 
518.66 
50.00 
546. 66 
344. 80 
201.86 



147.98 
304. 70 
222. 38 
559.83 
559. 83 



470. 60 
211.93 
162.12 



266.55 
215.27 
352. 85 
352. 85 



234.11 
234.11 



71.70 
71.70 



92.23 
92.23 



216. 44 

31.61 

431.32 

308. 02 

123.30 

172.52 

144.26 

28.26 

88.95 

60.95 

28.00 

102.80 

75.42 

22.74 



355.24 
51.36 

2,761.02 
549.99 

2,211.03 
577.43 
115.00 
462.43 
164.83 
164.83 



46.00 

66.58 

118.35 

351.94 

351. 94 



4.64 
22.14 
58.23 
88.76 
84.30 
81.42 



1,257.60 

87.15 

n, 020.45 

150.00 



169.40 
570.44 
570.44 



2.88 
90.99 
82.14 
82.14 



1 49.81 

tOf this sum $924.45 was spent for text-books. 



93.28 
174.92 
153.16 
142.11 



11.05 

601.15 

20.50 

20.50 



1,036.64 
509.35 



719.13 
719.13 



1,301.22 

555. 36 

4,830.74 

1,773.08 

3, 057. 66 

1,323.04 

682. 35 

640.69 

894. 14 

816. 14 

78.00 

1,999.29 

599. 60 

1,245.05 

150.00 

4.64 

216.12 

522.79 

604.41 

1,149.23 

1,135.30 



13.93 

1,332.14 

885.01 

835.20 



49.81 



46 



Expenditures^ 1908-'09. 



Table VII. Spent for Administration— Continwed. 



Treasurer. 



Board of 
Education. 



Census and 
Committee- 
men. 



Chowan $ 380.49 $ 

Rural 199.35 ! 

Edenton 181.14 — 

Clay 63.53 

Cleveland 702. 05 

Rural ' 606.05 

Shelby 96.00 

Kings Mountain , 

Columbus 1 575.85 

Craven ' 653.28 

Rural - ' 493.28 

New Bern ] 160. 00 

Cumberland 1,157.78 

Rural 673.19 

Fayetteville 1 1440.19 

Hope Mills 1 44. 40 

Currituck- ; 218.34 

Dare - — ; 138.74 

Davidson 576.93 

Rural 466.93 

Lexington 

Thomasville 110.00 

Davie 1 207.84 

Duplin 573.48 

Durham 1,054.44 

Rural 754.44 

Durham 300.00 

Edgecombe 652.77 

Rural ' 561.50 

Tarboro 91.27 

Forsyth 435.00 

Rural 400.00 

Winston 25.00 

Kernersville 10. 00 



88.46 $ 
88.46 



78.10 
91.60 
91.60 



580. 15 
118. 82 
118.82 



111.88 

101.88 

10.00 

30.00 

205.12 

183. 12 

10.00 

12.00 

169.18 

159.80 

159.80 



All Other ' 
Expenses. 



182.25 

109.00 

73.25 



143.65 
143.65 



253.15 

200.82 



208.51 
208.51 



92.00 
92.00 



219.85 
92.91 

206.78 
206.78 



30.54 

22.88 

197.30 

197.30 



200. 82 

229. 18 

3.50 

225.68 



6.64 
55.34 

96.88 
96.88 



Total for 
Administra- 
tion. 



I 



257.64 
116.02 
313.30 
313.30 



28.12 
106. 45 
101.95 
101.95 



73.10 
73.10 



181.10 

181.10 



176. 27 
176.27 



247.82 

167.72 

75.00 

5.10 



60.55 
179.45 

1,727.79 
102.06 

1,625.73 
474.09 
254.09 
220.00 
485. 00 
235. 00 



250. 00 



763.08 

498.69 

264.39 

171.63 

1,142.42 

1,024.42 

106. 00 

12.00 

1,578.33 

1,132.72 

771.90 

360. 82 

1,687.47 

977.20 

665.87 

44.40 

475.37 

309.87 

1,077.89 

967.89 



110.00 

554. 15 

975. 40 

3,197.48 

1,271.75 

1,925.73 

1,381.06 

1,069.79 

311.27 

1,344.09 

978.99 

100.00 

265.10 



t$257.50 paid to sheriff for collection of taxes. 



Expenditures, 1908-'09. 



47 



Table VII. Spent for Administration— Cowtmwed. 



Franklin 

Rural 

Franklinton 

Louisburg- 

Youngsville 

Gaston 

Rural 

Gastonia 

Cherryville 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford 

Rural 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Guilford College 

Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck --. 

Weldon 

Enfield 

Roanoke Rapids-. 

Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville— 

Hertford 



Treasurer. 

$ 709.57 

420.96 



Board of 

Education. 



Census and 
Committee- 
men. 



248.18 - 
40.43 - 
100.00 I 
100.00 



259.28 
60.53 
854. 93 
775.27 
79.66 
210.69 
379.40 



379.40 



1,034.07 I 
657.79 



100. 00 
176.28 
100.00 
548. 14 
548.14 



295.05 I $ 
295.05 



All Other 
Expenses. 



Total for 
Administra- 
tion. 



142.70 $ 
142.70 



27.40 
27.40 



265.50 
255. 50 



134.99 

76.50 

245. 95 

245.95 



10.00 

77.34 

33.00 

165.70 

165.70 



58.74 
791.95 
791.95 



79.18 
158.82 

158. 82 



211.85 

211.85 



274. 92 
262. 92 



704. 38 $ 
457.20 

86.25 

75.00 

85.93 

735.59 

721.59 

4.00 

10.00 

36.04 
120. 48 
945.63 
682.35 
263.28 

98.90 

2,378.37 

1, 828. 58 

291.25 

207.41 

51.13 
487.30 

35.80 



531.03 
531.03 



12.00 
143.24 
143.24 



151.50 
50.00 
250.00 
209.32 
209. 32 



385. 97 
385.97 



90.40 
90.40 



92.40 
92.40 



218.60 
218.60 



943.92 
t943.92 



239. 50 
239.50 



280.48 



212.52 



44.53 

29. 57 

14.96 

161.76 



662. 16 

643. 56 

18.60 



1,851.70 

1,315.91 

86.25 

323. 18 

126.36 

1,128.49 

1.104.49 

4.00 

20.00 

507.65 

290.51 

2,212.21 

1,869.27 

342.94 

448.51 

3,708.54 

2,779.35 

291.25 

586.81 

51.13 

2,008.14 

1,168.36 



251.50 

226. 28 

362. 00 

1,431.73 

1,431.73 



787.37 
787.37 



1,890.11 

1,856.55 

33.56 

654.76 



tFor collection and disbursement. 



48 



Expenditures^ 1908-'09, 



Table VII. Spent for Administration— Cowti«Med. 



Hyde 

Rural 

Swan Quarter- 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville — 
Statesville 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

Smithfield 

Jones 

Lee 

Rural 

■ Sanford 

Lenoir 

Rural 

Kinston 

LaGrange 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincolnton 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Rural 

Williamston--. 
Robersonville - 

McDowell 

Rural 

Marion 

Mecklenburg — 

Rural 

Charlotte 

Mitchell 



Treasurer. 



Board of 
Education. 



! Census and 
Committee- 
men. 



All Other 
Expenses. 



Total for 
Administra- 
tion. 



190.28 ! $ 
190.28 



827.02 
617.02 
110. 00 
100.00 
301.41 
919.67 
809.57 
34.00 
76.10 
160.45 
252.00 
206.00 
46.00 
642. 02 
492.02 
150.00 



100.80 I $ 
100.80 



33.62 $ 
33.62 



335.88 
335. 88 



282.35 

354.27 

499.32 

375.72 

73.60 

50.00 

458.12 

408. 12 

50.00 

606.00 

606. 00 



274.99 
274.99 



77.40 
86.05 
86.05 



158. 50 
118.68 
118. 68 



82.95 
82.95 



152.51 
152.51 



100.00 
130.60 
270. 35 
270.35 



917.84 
917.84 



501.56 

501.56 



108.57 
108.57 



56.05 
193.59 
181.59 

12.00 



56.00 
79.48 
79.48 



207. 02 

149. 00 

58.02 



49.08 

30.56 

18.52 

68.26 

118.02 

125.42 

115.42 



10.00 
88.68 
88.68 



61.85 
61.85 



255. 98 



126. 00 



311.00 

128.88 
182.12 
120. 00 



360. 73 

77.00 

283.73 



92.24 

620. 71 

570. 92 

49.79 



15.80 
15.80 



435.07 
271.53 



163. 54 
267. 06 
267.06 



54.20 

170.13 

447.40 

192.50 

250.00 

4.90 

772. 13 

741.00 

31.13 

2,813.36 

597.75 

2,215.61 



386.55 
386. 55 



1,571.31 

1,077.58 

393.73 

100.00 

527.10 

1,820.02 

1,648.13 

95.79 

76.10 

374. 95 

465. 96 
419.96 

46.00 

1,367.06 

995.50 

208.02 

163. 54 

804.53 

786. 01 

18.52 

504.81 

773.02 

1,342.49 

953. 99 

323.60 

64.90 

2,236.77 

2,155.64 

81.13 

4,231.92 

1,834.19 

2,397.73 

501.98 



Expenditures, 1908-'09. 



49 



Table VII. Spent for Administration— CowtmMed. 



Montgomery 

Rural 

Troy 

Moore 

Rural 

Southern Pines ■ 

Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount -- 

Spring Hope 

New Hanover 

Rural 

Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Rural 

Elizabeth City - 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 

Person 

Rural 

Roxboro 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville 

Polk 

Randolph 

Rural 

Ashboro 

Randleman 



Treasurer. 



Board of 
Education. 



803.61 

t766.41 

37.20 

389. 06 

389.06 



877.07 
752. 07 
125.00 



Census and 
Committee- 
men. 



90.75 
90.75 



33.00 
33.00 



44.60 
44.60 



All Other 
Expenses. 



Total for 
Administra- 
tion. 



77.38 
3.50 
116.84 
114.84 
2.00 
341.00 
341.00 



887.20 
887. 20 



480.91 
326.25 
279.26 
228.61 
540.03 
256.70 
283.33 
403.50 
162.66 
162.66 



409.11 
271.94 
137. 17 
853.23 
853.23 



147.97 

675.76 

613.64 

37.12 

25.00 



123.79 
123.79 



31.68 
31.68 



167.01 

229.86 

213.68 

96.20 

77.65 

77.65 



181.76 
69.60 
69.60 



143. 59 
143.59 



293.65 
293. 65 



125.35 
71.98 
70.68 
55.04 

105.58 
50.78 
54.80 

137.34 
50.16 
50.16 



105. 20 

96.38 

8.82 

60.30 

60.30 



128.22 
334. 58 
334. 58 



43.46 
89.54 
66.94 
12.60 
10.00 



80.42 
80.42 



268.39 
250.09 



18.30 
430.40 
430. 40 



192. 65 



67.53 
114.26 
295.35 

43.65 
251.70 
588.27 



107. 99 
107.99 



674.49 
674.49 



151. 59 

333. 12 

275.95 

57.17 



975.24 

934. 54 

40.70 

619.32 

617. 32 

2.00 

1,512.76 

1,387.76 

125. 00 

18.30 

1,473.07 

1,473.07 



965.92 
628.09 
630.15 
494. 11 

1,018.61 
428.78 
589.83 

1,310.87 
282.42 
282.42 



765. 89 

619.90 

145. 99 

1,881.67 

1,881.67 



471.24 
1,433.00 
1,291.11 

106.89 
35.00 



tincludes sheriff's commissions for collection. 



Part II— 4 



50 



Expenditures, 1908-'09. 



Table VII. Spent for Administration— CowtiwMed. 



Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham -- 

Hamlet 

Robeson 

Rural 

Lumberton 

Maxton 

Rockingham 

Rural 

Reidsville 

Ruffin 

Madison 

Rowan 

Rural 

Salisbury 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Rural 

Albemarle 

Stokes 

Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy 

Pilot Mountain - 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Rural 

Monroe 

Vance 

Rural 

Henderson 



Treasurer. 



Board of 
Education. 



Census and 
Committee- 



337.11 
337. 11 



48.90 j $ 
48.90 



All Other 
Expenses. 



Total for 
Administra- 
tion. 



90.54 $ 
82.54 ! 



1,143.20 
1,083.20 



798. 15 
798.15 



8.00 
226. 00 
215.00 



60.00 
780.48 
342.36 
438.12 



59.50 
59.50 i. 



11.00 
258.60 
147. 10 

76.50 



450.00 
450.00 



383.33 
712.44 
630.46 

81.98 
172.31 
304.69 
260.81 

43.88 
278.12 
451.86 
451.86 



135. 10 
135.10 



414.00 
253.44 
253.44 



35.00 
184.36 
184. 36 



159. 42 
233.80 
233.80 



188.05 
44.30 
44.30 



70.90 
98.46 
98.46 



78.68 
85.44 
85.44 



140.97 
48.63 
48.63 



217.50 
281.70 
111. 74 
572.37 
572.37 



120. 57 
185.81 
54.60 
146.05 
146.05 



752.17 
627. 17 
125. 00 



119.97 
119.97 



33.94 

45.18 

19.92 

224.30 

224.30 



125.82 
125.82 



29.60 I $ 
19.60 



10.00 
502.53 
502.53 



595. 69 
295. 69 



300.00 



134. 10 
134.10 



156.15 
551.37 
551.37 



5.70 
5.70 



364. 28 
261.27 
261. 27 



11.25 
244.40 

69.50 
138.95 

96.95 

42.00 
163.62 
105.45 

58.17 



506.15 

488. 15 



18.00 

2,669.88 
2,598.88 



71.00 
1,694.27 
844.65 
514.62 
300.00 
35.00 
903. 56 
903. 56 



1,112.90 

1,751.05 

1,669.07 

81.98 

439.04 

440.13 

396.25 

43.88 

854. 27 

860. 22 

860.22 



383. 26 

757.09 

255.76 

1,081.67 

1,039.67 

42.00 

1,161.58 

978.41 

183. 17 



Expenditures, 1908-'09. 



51 



Table VII. Spent for Administration— CowfinMed. 



Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive 

Fremont 

Wilkes 

Rural 

Wilkesboro 

North Wilkesboro- 

Wilson 

Rural 

Wilson City 

Lucama 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

North Carolina 

Rural 

City 



Treasurer. 



$ 1,932.25 
1,413.65 
518. 60 
337-50 
160. 48 
160.48 



Board of 
Education. 



$ 1,181.23 
1,181.23 



30.80 
80.64 
80.64 



Census and 
Committee- 



217.03 
217.03 



226.26 
22.96 
22.96 



168.16 
982.24 
818. 84 
50.00 
113.40 



622.09 
572.09 



50.00 
843.58 
768.58 

75.00 



238.80 
125. 59 



44.05 
148.60 
148.60 



134.95 
134.95 



188.46 
188.46 



92.04 
267.87 
258. 79 



9.08 
80.68 
68.94 



11.74 
95.89 
95.89 



105.20 
103.40 



100.00 
89.10 



47, 182. 29 

40,347.79 

6,834.50 



19,403.06 

19,342.18 

60.88 



11,972.05 

10,760.22 

1,211.83 



All Other 
Expenses. 



3,617.47 

1,558.99 

2,058.48 

646.89 

200. 00 

200.00 



15.00 
413.09 
210.98 
192.11 



10.00 
630.19 
604. 49 

25.70 



427.72 
155.07 
272.65 



25.00 
93.87 



Total for 
Administra- 
tion. 



37, 102. 84 
22,049.21 
15,053.63 



6,947.98 
4,370.90 
2,577.08 
1,241.45 
464.08 
464. 08 



319.25 

1,811.80 

1,437.21 

242. 11 

113. 40 

19.08 

1,467.91 

1,380.47 

25.70 

61.74 

1,555.65 

1,208.00 

347.65 



469.00 

411.96 



115,660.24 
92,499.40 
23,160.84 



C. SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



TABLE VIII. 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE BY COUNTIES AND 
TOWNS 1908-'09. 



This table gives the school population, enrollment and average daily at- 
tendance, by races, for the several counties and towns, numerically, and also 
the percentage of school population enrolled, percentage of enrollment in aver- 
age daily attendance for the State. 

Summary of Table VIII and Comparison vv^ith 1907-'08. 



Rural. 



y. 


North 
Carolina. 


128,908 


727.565 


125,166 


715,716 


3,742 


11.849 


80,051 


490,710 


77,759 


483,915 


2,292 


6.795 


48,857 


236,855 


47.407 


231.801 


1,450 


5.054 


78.267 


521.202 


74,495 


497.716 


3,772 


23.486 


52,867 


360,775 


50.567 


346, 575 


2.300 


14,200 


25,400 


160,427 


23,928 


151,141 


1,472 


9,286 


55,175 


335,969 


50,255 


308,488 


4.920 


27,481 


39.591 


240,879 


36.696 


220,371 


2.895 


20,508 


15,584 


95,090 


13,559 


88,117 


2.025 


6,973 


60.7 


71.5 


59.5 


69.5 


1.2 


2.0 



Total school population, 1908-'09 

Total school population, 1907-'08 

Increase 

White school population, 1908-'09 

White school population, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Colored school population, 1908-'09 

Colored school population, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Total enrollment, 1908-'09 

Total enrollment, 1907-'08 

Increase 

White enrollment, 1908-'09 

White enrollment, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Colored enrollment, 1908-'09 

Colored enrollment, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Total average daily attendance, 1908-'09-- 
Total average daily attendance, 1907-'08 -- 

Increase 

White average daily attendance, 1908-'09-- 
White average daily attendance, 1907-'08 - 

Increase 

Colored average daily attendance, 1908-'09 
Colored average daily attendance, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Percentage of school population enrolled, 

1908- '09. 
Percentage of school population enrolled, 

1907-'08. 
Increase 



598.657 

590. 555 

8.102 

410,659 

406, 156 

4,503 

187,998 

184,394 

3,604 

442, 935 

423.221 

19.714 

307,908 

296. 008 

11,900 

135,027 

127,213 

7,814 

280,794 

258,233 

22,561 

201,288 

183,675 

17.613 

79,506 

74,558 

4,948 

73.9 

71.7 

2.2 



School Attendance, 1908-'09. 



53 



Table VIIl. School Attendance— Continwed. 



Percentage of white school population en- 
rolled, 1908-'09. 

Percentage of white school population en- 
rolled, 1907-'08. 
Increase 

Percentage of colored school population en- 
rolled, 1908-'09. 

Percentage of colored school population en- 
rolled, 1907-'08. 
Increase 

Percentage of enrollment in average daily 

attendance, 1908-'09. 
Percentage of enrollment in average daily 

attendance, 1907-'08 
Increase 

Percentage of white enrollment in average 

daily attendance, 1908-'09. 
Percentage of white enrollment in average 

daily attendance, 1907-'08. 
Increase 

Percentage of colored enrollment in average 

daily attendance, 1908-'09. 
Percentage of colored enrollment in average 

daily attendance, 1907-'08. 
Increase 



Rural. 



74.9 
72.9 

2.0 
71.8 
68.9 

2.9 
63.3 
61.0 

2.3 
65.3 
62.0 

3.3 

58.8 

58.6 

.2 



City. 



66.0 
65.0 

1.0 
51.9 
50.5 

1.4 
70.4 
67.5 

2.9 
74.8 
72. ff 

2.2 
61.3 
56.7 

4.6 



North 
Carolina. 



73.3 
71.6 

1.7 
67.7 
65.2 

2.5 
64.4 
61.8 

2.6 
66.7 
63.6 

3.1 

59.2 

58.3 

.9 



I I I I I White 

White ; Colored Total ! White ! Colored Total Aver- 
School , School School School School School age 



Colored Total 
Aver- ! Aver- 
age age 



Popu- 
lation. 



Popu- Popu- Enroll- i Enroll- Enroll- Daily ' Daily Daily 
lation. lation. , ment. ment. menl. Attend- Attend- Attend- 
ance. I ance. i ance. 



Alamance 6,862 

Rural 4,155 

Burlington 1,281 

Graham 676 

Haw River 510 

Mebane 240 

Alexander 3,767 

Alleghany 2,969 

Anson — 3,950 

Rural 3,226 

Wadesboro ! 724 

Ashe 7,242 

Beaufort 5,539 

Rural 4,128 

Washington 1,011 

Belhaven 1 400 



2,611 
1,919 
154 
258 
81 
199 
287 
152 
4,667 
4,048 ! 
619 : 
225 
3,986 
2,634 i 
1,002 ! 
350 



9,473 

6,074 

1,435 

934 

591 

439 

4,054 

3,121 

8,617 

7,274 

1,343 

7,467 

9,525 

6,762 

2,013 

750 



4,723 

2,950 

900 

448 

274 

151 

3,270 

2,420 

3,412 

2,884 

528 

4,567 

4,347 

3,273 

683 

391 



1,822 

1,372 

148 

148 

35 

119 

224 

68 

3,906 

3,567 

339 

180 

2,738 

1,990 

508 

240 



6,545 1 
4,322 ; 
1,048 
596 
309 
270 
3,494 
2,488 
7,318 
6,451 
867 
4.747 
7,085 
5,263 
1,191 I 
631 '' 



3,628 

2,179 

843 

295 

209 

102 

2,930 

1,432 

2,221 

1,883 

338 

3,745 

2,778 

1,984 

538 

256 



1,044 

762 

117 

79 

20 

66 

182 

53 

2,587 

2,385 

202 

61 

1,632 

1,247 

290 

95 



4,672 

2,941 

960 

374 

229 

168 

3,112 

1,485 

4,808 

4,268 

540 

3,806 

4,410 

3,231 

828 

351 



54 



School Attendance^, 1908-'09. 



Table VIII. School Attendance — Continued. 



Bertie 

Rural 

Aulander -- 
Windsor — 

Bladen 

Brunswick — 
Buncombe — 

Rural 

Asheville -- 

Burke 

Rural 

Morgan ton - 

Cabarrus 

Rural 

Concord 

Caldwell 

Rural 

Lenoir 

Granite 

Rhodhiss— - 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Rural 

Hickory — 

Newton 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Rural 

Andrews — 

Murphy 

Chowan 

Rural 

Edenton — 
Clay 



White 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 



Colored 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 



3,120 


4,587 


2,808 


4,378 


131 





181 


209 


2,977 


2.808 


2,535 


1,764 


14, 106 


3,025 


9,884 


1.082 


4,222 


1,943 


5,935 


953 


4,856 


590 


1,079 


363 


6,411 


2.175 


4,291 


1,625 


2,120 


550 


5,999 


801 


4,755 


547 


783 


254 


230 




231 




1,196 


932 


3,461 


714 


2.331 


2,611 


8,489 


1,333 


6,766 


793 


958 


397 


765 


143 


5.132 


2,927 


5,829 


212 


5,016 


172 


349 


40 


464 




1,608 


1,773 


1,157 


1,637 


451 


136 


1,430 


68 



Total 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 



7,707 

7,186 

131 

390 

5,785 

4,299 

17,131 

10, 966 

6,165 

6,888 

5,446 

1.442 

8,586 

5,916 

2.670 

6,800 

5,302 

1,037 

230 

231 

2,128 

4,175 

4,942 

9,822 

7,559 

1,355 

908 

8,059 

6,041 

5,188 

389 

464 

3,381 

2,794 

587 

1,498 



White Colored 



School 
Enroll- 
ment. 



2,528 

2,191 

167 

170 

2,520 

2,250 

9,951 

7,565 

2,386 

3,361 

2,792 

569 

4,427 

3,096 

1,331 

4,811 

3,903 

589 

175 

144 

884 

2,282 

1,553 

5,753 

4,742 

612 

399 

3,729 

4,330 

3,655 

420 

255 

1,219 

881 

338 

1.043 



School 
Enroll- 
ment. 



3,363 
3,212 



151 

2,438 

1,762 

1.575 

707 

, 868 

581 

438 

143 

1,423 

1,102 

321 

724 

450 

274 



698 
391 

1,713 

871 

565 

209 

97 

2,057 

201 

151 

50 



Total 
School 
Enroll- 
ment. 



White 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance. 



1,323 
1,248 

75 
35 



5,891 

5,403 

167 

321 

4,958 

4,012 

11.526 

8,272 

3,254 

3,942 

3,230 

712 

5,850 

4,198 

1,652 

5,535 

4,353 

863 

175 

144 

1,582 

2,673 

3,266 

6,624 

5,307 

821 

496 

5,786 

4,531 

3,806 

470 

255 

2,542 

2,129 

413 

1,078 



Colored 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance. 



1,632 

1,383 

120 

129 

1,640 

1.219 

6,159 

4,426 

1,733 

2,174 

1,692 

482 

3,200 

1,983 

1,217 

3,594 

3,057 

376 

100 

61 

729 

1,434 

973 

4,231 

3,485 

446 

300 

2,550 

2.953 

2.527 

291 

135 

761 

516 

245 

643 



1.983 
1.926 



57 

1,242 

989 

1.100 

419 

681 

392 

307 

85 

890 

677 

213 

520 

351 

169 



444 

222 

1.049 

527 

338 

109 

80 

1,295 

110 

80 

30 



Total 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance. 



837 

791 

46 

18 



3,615 

3,309 

120 

186 

2,882 

2.208 

7.259 

4,845 

2,414 

2,564 

1,999 

567 

4,090 

2,660 

1,430 

4,114 

3,403 

545 

100 

61 

1,173 

1,656 

2,022 

4,758 

3,823 

555 

380 

3,845 

3,063 

2,607 

321 

135 

1.598 

1.307 

291 

661 



School Attendance^ 1908-'09. 



55 



Table VIII. School Attendance— Cowitntted. 



Cleveland 

Rural 

Shelby 

Kings Mountain 

Columbus 

Craven 

Rural 

New Bern 

Cumberland 

Rural 

Fayetteville 

Hope Mills 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Rural 

Lexington 

Thomasville 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Rural 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Rural 

Tarboro 

Forsyth 

Rural 

Winston 

Kernersville 

Franklin 

Rural 

Franklinton 

Louisburg 

Youngsville 



White 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 


Colored 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 


Total 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 


7,914 


1,695 


9,609 


6,658 


1,444 


8,102 


720 


159 


879 


536 


92 


628 


6,018 


2,997 


9,015 


3,206 


4,353 


7,559 


2,249 


2,610 


4,859 


957 


1,743 


2,700 


6,803 


5,293 


12,096 


5,018 


4,111 


9,129 


1,240 


1,182 


2,422 


545 




545 


1,802 


989 


2,791 


1,486 


166 


1,652 


8,118 


1,154 


9,272 


6,588 


723 


7,311 


901 


202 


1,103 


629 


229 


858 


3,719 


917 


4,636 


4,905 


3,013 


7,918 


6,763 


3,900 


10,663 


3,643 


2,204 


5,847 


3,120 


1,696 


4,816 


3,118 


5,708 


8,826 


2,207 


4,440 


6,647 


911 


1,268 


2,179 


10,091 


4,202 


14,293 


7,074 


1,874 


8,948 


2,741 


2,264 


5,005 


276 


64 


340 


4,128 


4,334 


8,462 
6,430 


3,260 


3,170 


289 


400 


689 


329 


594 


923 


250 


170 


420 



White 
School 
Enroll- 
ment. 



Colored 
School 
Enroll- 
ment. 



5,624 

4,720 

500 

404 

4,418 

2,545 

1,771 

774 

4,960 

3,912 

717 

331 

1,332 

1,142 

5,924 

4,929 

572 

423 

2,679 

4,775 

4,539 

2,467 

2,072 

2,122 

1,613 

509 

6,625 

4,887 

1.513 

225 

3,131 

2,499 

209 

268 

155 



1,242 
1,084 
83 
75 
2,148 
2,661 
1,917 

744 
3,918 
3,360 

558 



680 

117 

956 

629 

172 

155 

868 

2,469 

2,510 

1,323 

1,187 

3,410 

2,838 

572 

2,355 

1,245 

1,030 

. 80 

2,644 

1,940 

283 

290 

131 



Total 
School 
Enroll- 
ment. 



White 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance. 



6,866 

5,804 

583 

479 

6,566 

5,206 

3,688 

1,518 

8,878 

7,272 

1,275 

331 

2,012 

1,259 

6.880 

5,558 

744 

578 

3,547 

7,244 

7,049 

3,790 

3,259 

5,532 

4,451 

1.081 

8,980 

6,132 

2,543 

305 

5,775 

4,439 

492 

558 

286 



Colored 

Aver- 
age 
Daily 
Attend- 



3,576 

2,884 

452 

240 

2,705 

1,621 

1,031 

590 

3,190 

2,468 

538 

184 

904 

909 

4,025 

3.353 

391 

281 

1,652 

4,081 

3,089 

1,509 

1,580 

1,275 

874 

401 

4,392 

3,011 

1,196 

185 

1,896 

1,492 

147 

177 

80 



641 

545 

61 

35 

1,400 

1,436 

1,040 

396 
2,672 
2,320 

352 



292 

95 

537 

339 

115 

83 

424 

1,750 

1,354 

575 

779 

1,645 

1,351 

294 

1,282 

654 

573 

55 

1,515 

1,229 

108 

108 

70 



Total 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance. 



4,217 

3,429 

513 

275 

4,105 

3.057 

2,071 

986 

5,862 

4,788 

890 

184 

1,196 

1,004 

4,562 

3,692 

506 

364 

2,076 

5,831 

4,443 

2,084 

2,359 

2,920 

2,225 

695 

5,674 

3,665 

1,769 

240 

3,411 

2,721 

255 

285 

150 



56 



School Attendance^ 1908-'09. 



Table VIII. School Attendance— Cowtinwed. 



Gaston 

Rural 

Gastonia 

Cherryville 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford 

Rural 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Guilford College 

Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck -- 

Weldon 

Enfield 

Roanoke Rapids 

Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville-- 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Rural 

Swan Quarter- -- 



White 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 



9,315 
7,316 
1,465 

534 
1,964 
1,637 
4.043 
3,499 

544 
2.180 
13,556 
8,891 
2,514 
1,976 

175 
4,011 
2,371 

380 

335 

296 

629 

5,455 

.4, 930 

525 
5,850 
5,115 

735 
4,481 
3,994 

487 
2,165 
1,815 
1,657 

158 



Colored 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 



3,001 
2,556 

445 



1,995 

46 

4,332 

3,502 

830 
1,973 
5,018 
2,757 
1,653 

608 



7,684 

6,638 

160 

394 

418 

74 

2,215 

2,215 



Total 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 



235 



235 

669 

408 

. 261 

3.235 

1,483 

1,431 

52 



12,316 
9,872 
1,910 

534 
3,959 
1,683 
8,375 
7,001 
1,374 
4,153 
18,574 
11,648 
4,167 
2,584 

175 

11,695 

9,009 

540 

729 

714 

703 
7,670 
7,145 

525 
6.085 
5,115 

970 
5,150 
4,402 

748 
5,400 
3,298 
3,088 

210 



White 
School 
Enroll- 
ment. 



6,107 

4,884 

856 

367 

1,547 

1,250 

2,887 

2.502 

385 

1.704 

9.341 

6,227 

1,820 

1,142 

152 

3.182 

2,084 

332 

268 

233 

265 

4,030 

3,604 

426 

4,405 

3,751 

654 

3,499 

3,040 

459 

1,232 

1,325 

1,201 

124 



Colored 
School 
Enroll- 
ment. 



2,076 

1,743 

333 



1,254 



2,854 

2,439 

415 

1,532 

2,789 

1,876 

538 

375 



Total 
School 
Enroll: 

ment. 



White 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 
Attend 
ance. 



4,689 

4,036 

155 

216 

212 

70 

1,159 

1,159 



173 



173 

496 

332 

164 

2,336 

1,235 

1,197 

38 



8,183 
6.627 
1,189 

367 
2,801 
1,250 
5,741 
4,941 

800 
3,236 
12, 130 
8,103 
2,358 
1,517 

152 
7,871 
6,120 

487 

484 

445 

335 
5,189 
4,763 

426 
4,578 
3,751 

827 
3,995 
3,372 

623 
3,568 
2,560 
2,398 

162 



3.831 

3.003 

575 

253 

1,036 

637 

1,856 

1,554 

302 

1,005 

6,317 

3,986 

1,389 

838 

104 

1,854 

1,056 

242 

217 

191 

148 

2,472 

2,257 

215 

2,706 

2,245 

461 

2,120 

1,772 

348 

754 

913 

826 

87 



Colored 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance. 



1,238 

1,068 

170 



772 



1,478 

1,246 

232 

764 

1,851 

1,202 

444 

205 



2,331 

1,991 

69 

101 

141 

29 

693 

693 



105 



105 

331 

235 

96 

1,311 

875 

851 

24 



Total 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance. 



5,069 
4,071 

745 

253 
1,808 

637 
3,334 
2,800 

534 
1,769 
8,168 
5,188 
1,833 
1,043 

104 
4,185 
3,047 

311 

318 

332 

177 
3,165 
2, 950 

215 
2,811 
2,245 

566 
2,451 
2,007 

444 
2,065 
1,788 
1,677 

111 



School Attendance, 1908-'09. 



57 



Table VIII. School Attendance — Continued. 



Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville — 
Statesville 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

Smithfield 

Jones 

Lee 

Rural 

Sanford 

Lenoir 

Rural 

Kinston 

LaGrange 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincoln ton - — 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Rural 

Williamston--- 
Robersonville - 

McDowell 

Rural 

Marion 

Mecklenburg - - 

Rural 

Charlotte 

Mitchell --. 

Montgomery — 

Rural 

Troy 



White 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 



Colored 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 



8,522 
6,637 

870 

1,015 

4,461 

10,156 

9,292 

459 

405 
1,474 
2,624 
1,944 

680 
3,896 
2,248 
1,316 

332 
4,890 
4,256 

634 
4,127 
7,723 
2,892 
2,430 

241 

221 
5.104 
4,638 

466 
12,585 
6,739 
5,846 
6,324 
3,709 
3,359 
350 



2,727 

2,261 

200 

266 

230 

3,343 

2,780 

270 

293 

1,317 

1,233 

1,233 



Total 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 



2,742 

1,,555 

855 

332 

1,167 

877 

290 

220 

183 

2,941 

2,509 

325 

107 

404 

404 



8,722 
5,480 
3,242 

169 
1,351 
1,138 

213 



11,249 
8,898 
1,070 
1,281 
4,691 
13, 499 
12,072 
729 
698 
2,791 
3,857 
3,177 
680 
6,638 
3,803 
2,171 
664 
6,057 
5.133 
924 
4,347 
7,906 
5,833 
4,939 
566 
328 
5,508 
5,042 
466 
21,307 
12,219 
9,088 
6,493 
5,060 
4,497 
563 



White 
School 
Enroll- 
ment. 


Colored 
School 
Enroll- 
ment. 


6,769 


1,778 


5,610 


1,394 


531 


187 


628 


197 


3,023 


184 


7,454 


2,534 


6,887 


2,162 


284 


175 


283 


197 



1,059 
2,037 
1,545 

492 
4,339 
3,237 

854 

248 
3,693 
3,242 

451 
3,097 
5,190 
2.615 
2,170 

216 

229 
3,463 
3,131 

332 
8,973 
5,486 
3,487 
4,556 
2, 777 
2,573 

204 



1,095 
957 
957 



White 
Total i Aver- 
School ' age 
Enroll- Daily 
ment. Attend- 
ance. 



1,619 

1,045 

398 

176 

584 

394 

190 

128 

84 

2,237 

1,978 

203 

56 

288 

288 



5,077 
3,543 
1,534 
103 
964 
789 
175 



8,547 

7,004 

718 

825 
3,207 
9,988 
9,049 

459 

480 
2,154 
2,994 
2,502 

492 
5,958 
4,282 
1,252 

424 
4,277 
3,636 

641 
3,225 
5,274 
4,852 
4,148 

419 

285 
3,751 
3,419 

332 
14,050 
9,029 
5,021 
4,659 
3,741 
3,362 

379 



Colored 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance. 



4,505 
3,628 
363 
514 
1,846 
4,586 
4,212 
201 
173 
614 
1,423 
1,030 
393 
3,138 
2,348 
628 
162 
2,490 
2,063 
427 
1,964 
3,166 
1,860 
1,574 
146 
140 
2,411 
2,150 
261 
6,613 
4,054 
2,559 
2,807 
1,910 
1,778 
132 



1,125 

889 

96 

140 

99 

1,371 

1,171 

65 

135 

641 

586 

586 



Total 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance. 



1,099 

856 

150 

"93 

605 

440 

165 

97 

52 

1,456 

1,285 

145 

26 

179 

179 



3,168 

2,125 

1.043 

81 

618 

468 

150 



5.630 
4,517 
459 
654 
1,945 
5,957 
5,383 
266 
308 
1,255 
2,009 
1,616 
393 
4.237 
3,204 
778 
255 
3,095 
2,503 
592 
2,061 
3,218 
3,316 
2,859 
291 
166 
2,590 
2,329 
261 
9,781 
6,179 
3,602 
2,888 
2.528 
2,246 
282 



58 



School Attendakce^ 1908-'09. 



Table VIII. School Attendance— ConiiwMed. 



Moore 

Rural 

Southern Pines 

Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount -- 
Spring Hope — 

New Hanover 

Rural 

Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Rural 

Elizabeth City - 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 

Person 

Rural 

Roxboro 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville 

Polk 

Randolph 

Rural 

Ashboro 

Randleman 

Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham 

Hamlet 



White 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 


Colored 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 


3,922 
3,827 


2,000 
2,000 


95 




6,547 


4,728 


4,876 


3,363 


1,360 


1,000 


311 


365 


3,942 


3,747 


814 


941 


3,128 


2,806 


2,802 


4,275 


3,176 


1,530 


3,142 


1,723 


2,164 


1,322 


2,641 


2,645 


1,223 


1,323 


1.418 


1,322 


2,223 


2,579 


1,773 


1.812 


1,533 


1,586 


240 


226 


3.338 


2.493 


2,991 


2,380 


347 


113 


6,361 


5,864 


5,875 


5,152 


486 


712 


2,119 


399 


8,820 


1,386 


7,592 


1,190 


455 


196 


773 




3,497 


3,199 


2.851 


2,610 


386 


277 


260 


312 



Total 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 



5,922 

5.827 

95 

11,275 

2,360 

676 

7.689 

1,755 

5,934 

7,077 

4,706 

4,865 

3,486 

5,286 

2,546 

2,740 

4,802 

3,585 

3,119 

466 

5,831 

5,371 

460 

12, 225 

11,027 

1,198 

2,518 

10,206 

8,782 

651 

773 

6,696 

5,461 

663 

572 



White 
School 
Enroll- 
ment. 



3,116 

3,035 

81 

3.971 

2,774 

925 

272 

2,862 

627 

2,235 

2,077 

2,659 

2,349 

1,729 

1,861 

963 

898 

1,776 

1,344 

1,121 

223 

2,319 

1,993 

326 

5,667 

5,221 

446 

1,423 

6,257 

5,412 

416 

429 

2,153 

1,644 

258 

251 



Colored 
School 
Enroll- 
ment. 



1,528 
1,528 



2,314 

1,682 

440 

192 

2,010 

703 

1,307 

3,013 

1,257 

1,044 

878 

1,509 

1,036 

473 

1,792 

1,431 

1,275 

156 

1,802 

1,564 

238 

3,634 

3,220 

414 

397 

975 

833 

142 



2,341 

2,001 

174 

166 



I 



417 



Total 
School 
Enroll- 
ment. 


White 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 
Attend- 




ance. 


4,644 


2,100 


4,563 


2,044 


81 


56 


6, 285 


2,631 


4,456 


1,604 


1,365 


871 


464 


156 


4,872 


2,161 


1,330 


387 


3,542 


1,774 


5,090 


1,328 


3,916 


1,984 


3,393 


1,506 


2,607 


1,097 


3,370 


1,370 


1,999 


627 


1,371 


743 


3,568 


1,175 


2,775 


974 


2,396 


789 


379 


185 


4.121 


1,401 


3,557 


1,146 


564 


255 


9,301 


4,482 


8.441 


4,110 


860 


372 


1,820 


899 


7,232 


4,432 


6,245 


3,848 


558 


329 


429 


255 


4,494 


1,342 


3,645 


986 


432 


195 



Colored 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance. 



161 



967 
967 



1,505 

l,-075 

350 

80 

1,217 
426 
791 

1,558 
928 
590 
544 
850 
552 
298 

1,143 
812 
704 
108 
890 
761 
129 

1.779 

1,608 
171 
260 
678 
561 
117 



Total 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 
Attend- 



1,340 

1,168 

97 

75 



3,067 
3,011 
56 
4,136 
2,679 
1,221 

236 
3,378 

813 
2,565 
2,886 
2,912 
2,096 
1,641 
2,220 
1,179 
1,041 
2,318 
1,786 
1,493 

293 
2,291 
1,907 

384 
6,261 
5,718 

543 
1,159 
5,110 
4,409 

446 

255 
2,682 
2,154 

292 

236 



School Attendance, 1908-'09. 



59 



Table VIII. School Attendance — Continued. 



Robeson 

Rui'al 

Lumberton 

Maxton 

Rockingham 

Rural 

Reidsville 

RufRn 

Madison 

Rowan 

Rural 

Salisbury 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Rural 

Albemarle 

Stokes 

Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy — 
Pilot Mountain- 
Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Rural 

Monroe 

Vance 

. Rural 

Henderson 



White 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 


Colored 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 


Total 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 


White 
School 
Enroll- 
ment. 


Colored 
School 
Enroll- 
ment. 


Total 
School 
Enroll 
ment. 


White 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance. 


Colored 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance. 


7,276 


8,737 


16,013 


5,925 


6,965 


12,890 


3,858 


4,033 


6,643 


*8,332 


14,975 


5,387 


*6, 716 


12, 103 


3,466 


•3,886 


436 


290 


726 


370 


159 


529 


258 


92 


197 


115 


312 


168 


90 


258 


134 


55 


9,067 


4,739 


13,806 


5,556 


2,675 


8,231 


3,732 


1,745 


7,442 


3,041 


10,483 


4,541 


1,788 


6,329 


2,877 


1,019 


1,115 


1,123 


2.238 


615 


520 


1,135 


532 


452 


160 


150 


310 


125 


90 


215 


100 


60 


350 


425 


775 


275 


277 


552 


223 


214 


9,316 


3,004 


12,320 


6,509 


2,223 


8,732 


4,687 


1,353 


7,798 


2,258 


10,056 


5,609 


1,824 


7,433 


3,852 


1,153 


1,518 


746 


2,264 


900 


399 


1,299 


835 


200 


7,211 


1,635 


8,846 


5,175 


986 


6,161 


3,495 


568 


6,679 


4,058 


10,737 


5,451 


3,064 


8,515 


4,061 


1,789 


6,313 


3,587 


9,900 


5,151 


2,671 


7,822 


3,858 


1,578 


366 


471 


837 


300 


393 


693 


203 


211 


1,508 


1,851 


3,359 


829 


1,623 


2,452 


529 


967 


5,676 


737 


6,413 


3,821 


546 


4,367 


2,862 


372 


4,851 


737 


5,588 


3.506 


546 


4,052 


2,631 


372 


825 




825 


315 




315 


231 




6,058 


868 


6,926 


4,630 


573 


5,203 


2,490 


. 380 


9,572 


986 


10,558 


6,832 


817 


7,649 


4,556 


503 


8,204 


718 


8,922 


5,956 


615 


6,571 


3,947 


378 


1,144 


268 


1,412 


678 


202 


880 


483 


125 


224 




224 


198 




198 


126 




3,053 


111 


3,164 


2,212 


68 


2,280 


1,170 


40 


2,118 


252 


2,370 


1,776 


219 


1,995 


1,140 


125 


1,088 


442 


1,530 


820 


334 


1,154 


512 


181 


7,388 


3,431 


10,819 


6,846 


2,594 


9,440 


4,433 


1,713 


6,609 


3,154 


9,763 


6,266 


2,388 


8,654 


3,968 


1,587 


779 


277 


1,056 


580 


206 


786 


465 


126 


2,935 


3,624 


6,559 


2,135 


2,132 


4,267 


1,608 


1,204 


1,562 


2,404 


3,966 


1,404 


1,559 


2,963 


1,094 


918 


1,373 


1,220 


2,593 


731 


573 


1,304 


514 


286 



Total 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance. 



7,891 

7,352 

350 

189 

5,477 

3,896 

984 

160 

437 

6,040 

5,005 

1,035 

4,063 

5,850 

5,436 

414 

1,496 

3,234 

3,003 

231 

2,870 

5,059 

4,325 

608 

126 

1,210 

1,265 

693 

6,146 

5,555 

591 

2,812 

2,012 

800 



*Including Croatan Indians. 



60 



School Attendance^ 1908-'09. 



Table VIII. School Attendance— Cowiinwed. 



Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive 

Fremont 

Wilkes 

Rural 

Wilkesboro 

North Wilkesboro 

Wilson 

Rural 

Wilson City 

Lucama 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

North Carolina 

Rural 

City 



White 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 



Colored 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 



11,163 

7,360 

3,803 

2,335 

1,741 

1,292 

180 

269 

5,129 

6,679 

4,514 

1,556 

340 

269 

10,064 

9,265 

312 

487 

4,979 

3,728 

1,034 

217 

4,936 

4,354 

490, 710 

410,659 

80, 051 



9,427 

5,852 

3,575 

4,687 

1,907 

1,234 

320 

353 

77 

4,725 

2,780 

1,306 

454 

185 

1,037 

947 



90 

4,260 

2,384 

1,775 

101 

490 

101 



Total 
School 
Popu- 
lation. 



236, 855 

187, 998 

48, 857 



20, 590 

13,212 

7,378 

7,022 

3,648 

2,526 

500 

622 

5,206 

11,404 

7,294 

2,862 

794 

454 

11,101 

10,212 

312 

577 

9,239 

6,112 

2,809 

318 

5,426 

4,455 



727, 565 
598, 657 
128,908 



White 
School 
Enroll- 
ment. 



Colored Total 
School School 



7,615 

5,648 

1,967 

1,451 

1,207 

836 

139 

232 

3,847 

5,458 

3,765 

1,100 

349 

244 

7,734 

7,154 

264 

316 

3,910 

2,993 

764 

153 

3,733 

2,990 



360, 775 

307, 908 

52,867 



Enroll- 
ment. 



5,609 

4,483 

1,126 

3,246 

1,200 

824 

188 

188 



3,528 
2,218 
874 
306 
130 
804 
737 



67 

2,622 

1,974 

566 

82 

302 

76 



Enroll- 
ment. 



White 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance. 



160,427 

135,027 

25,400 



13.224 

10,131 

3,093 

4,697 

2,407 

1.660 

327 

420 

3.847 

8.986 

5.983 

1.974 

655 

374 

8,538 

7,891 

264 

383 

6,532 

4,967 

1,330 

235 

4,035 

3.066 



Colored 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance. 



521.202 

442,935 

78,267 



4,803 

3,390 

1,413 

899 

841 

596 

80 

165 

1,885 

3,463 

2,204 

865 

241 

153 

4,633 

4,200 

179 

254 

3,520 

2,862 

577 

81 

2,493 

1,552 



240, 879 

201,288 

39. 591 



3,290 

2,436 

854 

1,703 

667 

500 

90 

77 



2,214 
1,223 
715 
211 
65 
517 
470 



Total 
Aver- 
age 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance. 



47 

1,324 

1,028 

262 

34 

179 

16 



95,090 
79,506 
15.584 



8,093 

5,826 

2,267 

2,602 

1,508 

1,096 

170 

242 

1,885 

5,677 

3,427 

1,580 

452 

218 

5,150 

4,670 

179 

301 

4,844 

3,890 

839 

115 

2.672 

1,568 



335, 969 

280,794 

55, 175 



D. SALARIES OF TEACHERS AND LENGTH OF SCHOOL TERM. 



TABLE IX. SALARIES AND TERM, 1908-'09. 

This table shows, by races, the total number of teachers, the school term 
in days, the whole anmial amount paid teachers, the average annual amount 
paid each teacher. ' 

Summary of Table IX and Compaeison with 1907-'0S. 



Rural. 



City. 



North 
Carolina. 



Total number of teachers, 1908-'09 

Total number of teachers, 1907-'08 

Increase 

White teachers, 1908-'09 

White teachers, 1907-'08— 

Increase 

Colored teachers, 1908-'09 

Colored teachers, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Amount paid all teachers, 1908-'09 

Amount paid all teachers, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Amount paid white teachers, 1908-'09 

Amount paid white teachers, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Amount paid colored teachers, 1908-'09 

Amount paid colored teachers, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Average annual amount paid each teacher, 1908-'09— 
Average annual amount paid each teacher, 1907-'08— 

Increase 



Average annual amount paid each white teacher, 

1908-'09. 
Average annual amount paid each white teacher, 

1907-'08. 
Increase 



Average annual amount paid each colored teacher, 

1908-'09. 
Average annual amount paid each colored teacher, 

1907-'08. 
Increase 



Average term of all schools (in days), 1908-'09 

Average term of all schools (in days), 1907-'08 

Increase 

Average term of white schools (in days), 1908-'09 

Average term of white schools (in days), 1907-'08 — 

Increase 



9,370 

9,052 

318 

6,926 

6,650 

276 

2,444 

2,402 

42 

$ 1,264,955.76 

1,174,272.78 

90,682.98 

1,037,442.78 

952,445.93 

84, 996. 85 

227,512.98 

221,826.85 

5,686.13 

135.00 

129.72 

5.28 

149.81 

143.84 

5.97 

93.09 

92.35 

.74 

89.6 

87.1 

2.5 

92.7 

89.2 

3.5 



1,587 

1,498 

89 

1,203 

1,125 

78 

384 

373 

11 

543, 076. 95 

513,784.37 

29,292.58 

449,555.48 

421,697.28 

27,858.20 

93,521.47 

92,087.09 

1,434.38 

342.07 

342. 98 

* .91 

373. 69 

374. 84 

1.15 

240. 94 

246. 88 

*5.94 

172.3 

165.6 

6.7 

175.8 

165.5 

10.5 



$ 1, 



10,957 

10, 550 

407 

8,129 

7,775 

354 

2,828 

2,775 

53 

032. 71 

1,688,057.15 

119,975.56 

1,486,998.26 

1,374,143.21 

112,855.05 

321,034.45 

313,913.94 

7,120.51 

165. 02 

160.00 

5.02 

182.93 

176.73 

6.20 

113.52 

113.12 

.40 

101.3 

98.3 

3.0 

105.0 

100.0 

5.0 



*Decrease. 



62 



Salaries and Term^ 1908-'09. 



Table IX. Salaries and Tervl— Continued. 



Average term of colored schools (in days), 1908-'09 — 
Average term of colored schools (in days), 1907-'08— 

Increase 

Average monthly salary paid all teachers, 1908-'O9 -- 
Average monthly salary paid all teachers, 1907-'08 — 

Increase 

Average monthly salary paid white teachers, 1908-'09 
Average monthly salary paid white teachers, 1907-'08 

Increase . 

Average monthly salary paid colored teachers, 1908- 

1909. 
Average monthly salary paid colored teachers, 1907- 

1908. 
Increase 



Rural. 



City. 



North 
Carolina. 



81.2 
82.1 
*.9 
30.12 I $ 
29.78 

.34 j 
32.32 
32.24 

.08 
22.92 
22.48 

.44 



161.3 
163.1 

*1.8 
39.82 
41.42 
*1.60 
42.50 
45.04 
*2.54 
29.87 
30.20 
*.33 



91.9 

93.0 

•1.1 

32.58 

32.58 



34.80 
35.34 
•.54 
24.70 
24.32 
.08 



Alamance 

Rural 

Burlington 

Graham 

Haw River 

Mebane 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Rural 

Wadesboro 

Ashe 

Beaufort 

Rural 

Washington 

Belhaven 

Bertie 

Rural 

Aulander 

Windsor 

*Decrease. 



White. 






118 
80 
18 
10 

6 

4 

67 \ 
51 
61 
52 

9 

118 

92 

69 

17 

6 
79 
69 

5 

5 



<» .A 

bo" 

0)0 



150 

147 

180 

170 

140 

160 

72 

80 

99 

89 

160 

73 

103 

85 

157 

160 

90 

90 

160 

160 






160 



100 



115 



130 



128 



142 



4J Tfi 

C ea fci 



23,817.47 

12, 487. 47 

5,291.25 

3,278.75 

1, 400. 00 

1, 360. 00 

6,746.20 

4,778.49 

10,080.48 

7, 440. 48 

2,640.00 

11,208.34 

21,538.35 

13,906.35 

6,271.00 

1,361.00 

11.869.15 

10,009.15 

740.00 

1,120.00 



■5.1= 



Colored. 



$201.99 
156. 09 
293.95 
327.87 
233.33 
340.00 
100.68 

93.79 
165.25 
143.08 
293. 22 

94.98 
234. 11 
201.54 
368.88 
226.83 
150.24 
145.06 
148.00 
224. 00 






34 

28 
2 
2 



2 

8 

3 

46 

42 

4 

10 

46 

38 

6 

2 

58 

54 



IS ^ 

u ™ 



101 

87 
180 
170 



160 
65 
80 
93 
82 

160 
73 
83 
67 

157 

160 
79 
73 



160 



u o 

0) O " 

1) -- 

<a. 



115 



S S5 ^^ 

E-iPLh<m 



"> ^ 

^ w 



^3 0) 

> E rt f5 



$ 4,332.58 

2,845.83 

450.00 

446.75 



440. 00 

412.37 

264.00 

4.261.02 

3,541.02 

720.00 

410. 13 

5,969.15 

3, 989. 51 

1,500.00 

480. 00 

4,788.87 

4.363.87 



$127.42 
101.63 
225.00 
223.37 



220. 00 

51.54 

88.00 

96.84 

84.31 

180.00 

41.01 

129.76 

104.98 

250.00 

260.00 

82.60 

80.80 



425.00 106.25 



Salaries and Teem^ 190 8-' 09. 



68 



Table IX. Salaries and Term — Continued. 



Bladen 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Rural 

Asheville 

Burke 

Rural 

Morgan ton 

Cabarrus 

Rural 

Concord 

Caldwell 

Rural 

Lenoir 

Granite 

Rhodhiss 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Rural 

Hickory 

Newton 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Rural 

Andrews 

Murphy 

Chowan 

Rural 

Edenton 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Rural 

Shelby 

Kings Mountain 



White. 



S3 



78 
46 
182 
135 
47 
74 
61 
13 
87 
61 
26 
95 
76 
13 

4 

2 
27 
60 
49 
127 
108 
11 

8 
88 
98 
86 

8 

4 
28 
20 

8 

15 

131 

111 

11 

9 



1) 



85 

72 

125 

102 

190 

101 

92 

145 

114 

90 

170 

98 

81 

180 

140 

130 

80 

83 

80 

93 

81 

160 

160 

79 

91 

80 

160 

180 

128 

107 

180 

80 

99 

88 

160 

160 



E "i ,^ 

fj u m 



128 
90 



154 



123 



140 
100 
107 



101 



107 



100 



160 



123 



S rt i; 



> £ cs ^5 



11.034.26 

6,741.91 

52,270.97 

21,450.70 

30,820.27 

9,015.72 

5,689.22 

3,326.15 

20, 127. 97 

11,774.75 

8, 353. 22 

15,904.52 

9,313.32 

4,568.60 

1,502.60 

520.00 

4,854.70 

7,072.61 

5, 800. 02 

19,146.13 

14,438.63 

2,987.50 

1, 720. 00 

11,417.84 

9,242.97 

4,022.97 

2,870.00 

2,350.00 

6,579.25 

3,949.25 

2, 630. 00 

2,342.00 

20.836.09 

15,796.09 

2,840.00 

2,200.00 






$141.46 
146.12 
287.20 
158. 88 
698. 30 
121.83 
93.13 
255.85 
231.35 
193.02 
321.27 
171.01 
122.54 
415.32 
375. 65 
260.00 
179.80 
117.87 
118.36 
150.75 
133. 69 
271.59 
215.00 

129. 74 
94.31 
46.76 

358. 75 
587.50 
234. 93 
197.46 
328.75 
156. 13 
171.60 
142. 30 
258.18 
244.44 



Colored. 






46 
23 
33 
17 
16 
11 

8 

3 
27 
21 

6 
18 
14 

4 



12 

8 

38 

20 

15 

3 

2 

40 

4 

3 

1 



23 

22 

1 

1 

28 

25 

2 

1 



H 

=« :? 
u ss 

<.B 



78 

63 

88 

86 

190 

103 

75 

145 

102 

78 

170 

89 

75 

140 



80 
68 
80 
93 
80 
160 
120 
78 
80 
80 
80 



104 

101 

180 

80 

89 

80 

160 

100 



£-3 






O o 

1) - 

<.£ 



100 



135 



92 



107 



100 



80 



■<J CO 

§1 

C '^ 

E cs fc. 

o cs o 
HOh.2 



3,777.30 

2,161.99 

7,773.50 

1,279.25 

6,494.25 

1,262.94 

682.94 

580. 00 

3, 470. 16 

1,851.41 

1,618.75 

1,499.20 

945. 00 

554.20 



1,265.92 

710.00 

3,018.22 

1,907.40 

1,185.40 

.522.50 

199.50 

3, 507. 99 

240.00 

140.00 

100.00 



2,805.56 

2,580.56 

225. 00 

, 80.00 

2,569.20 

2,004.20 

440.00 

125.00 






> S rt >:5 

$ 82.11 
93.99 

235.56 
75.23 

405.89 

114.81 
85.36 

193. 33 

128.52 
88.16 

269.79 
79.40 
67.50 

138. 65 



105.49 
88.75 
79.42 

100.38 
79.02 

261.25 
99.75 
87.69 
60.00 
46.66 

100. 00 



121.98 

117.29 

225. 00 

80.00 

95.15 

80.16 

220. 00 

125. 00 



G4: 



Salaries and Tekm^ 1908-'09. 



Table IX. Salaries and Term— Continued. 



White. 



S Si 



Columbus 113 

Craven 70 

Rural 51 

New Bern 19 

Cumberland 119 

Rural 101 

Fayetteyille 12 

Hope Mills 6 

Currituck 43 

Dare 35 

Davidson 119 

Rural 103 

Lexington 10 

Thomasville 6 

Davie 54 

Duplin 99 

Durham 115 

Rural 61 

Durham 54 

Edgecombe 56 

Rural 44 

Tarboro 12 

Forsyth 154 

Rural 109 

Winston 39 

Kernersville 6 

Franklin 78 

Rural 64 

Franklinton 4 

Louisburg 5 

Youngsville 5 

Gaston 126 

Rural 100 

Gastonia 18 

Cherryville 



Eh 
01 • 

bo" 



94 
111 

89 
169 
108 
100 
160 
140 

90 

93 
162 

79 
160 
160 

83 

80 
172 
161 
185 
134 
122 
180 
122 
102 
176 
140 
102 

89 
160 
180 
140 
124 
115 
160 
155 



g M 



C CO 



140 



136 



144 



106 

94 



120 



130 
120 



174 



153 



137 



151 



150 



-p oa 

C cS s-i 
^H 0) 



23, 674. 18 

17,268.55 

8,912.40 

8,356.15 

22,821.02 

16,491.70 

5,249.93 

1,079.39 

5,790.75 

5,406.61 

17,943.67 

12.775.42 

3,180.00 

1,988.25 

5,548.46 

15,269.07 

5.186.59 

18,398.84 

32, 787. 75 

16,070.81 

11,940.81 

4,130.00 

34,735.69 

19,025.69 

15,000.00 

710. 00 

13, 762. 67 

9,742.67 

1,200.00 

2,160.00 

660. 00 

28,365-42 

20,376.67 

6,539.00 

1,449.75 



'2 fe 
> c cs j; 



$121.01 
246. 69 
174.75 
439. 79 
191. 77 
163.28 
437.49 
179.89 
134.66 
125.90 
150. 79 
124.03 
318.00 
331.37 
102.75 
154.23 
450.91 
302. 62 
607.18 
285.90 
271.38 
344. 16 
225. 55 
174.54 
384.61 
118.33 
176.44 
152.22 
300. 00 
432. 00 
132.00 
225.28 
203. 76 
363.27 
181.21 



Colored. 



OJ o 



36 
44 
35 

9 
64 
58 

6 



13 

3 

24 

19 

3 

2 

15 

46 

42 

18 

24 

42 

35 

7 

41 

24 

15 

2 

50 

42 

2 

4 

2 

35 

31 

4 



E 

H 

4) • 
OJQ 



74 
94 
80 

147 
87 
80 

160 



90 

93 

97 

81 

160 

160 

74 

80 

168 

145 

185 

98 

86 

160 

127 

112 

154 

110 

94 

83 

160 

180 

100 

67 

63 

160 



S a 
u o 

4) O - 
HhJ. 
<t> -. 



120 



80 



98 
94 



120 



163 



101 



106 



4J CQ 

G ^ 
C c3 •„ 



3,065.68 
5,110.00 
3,350.00 
1,760.00 
5,436.74 
3,885.75 
1,550.99 



1,436.95 

355.50 

2,602.05 

1,522.05 

560.00 

520.00 

1,056.91 

3,981.75 

9,963.25 

2,263.25 

7, 700. 00 

5, 426. 80 

4,051.80 

1,375.00 

6, 827. 63 

3,312.63 

3,240.00 

275.00 

4,780.40 

3,205.40 

400.00 

900.00 

275.00 

3,191.24 

2,191.24 

1,000.00 



A, O 

> c S fe 



$ 85.15 

116.13 

95.71 

195.55 

84.94 

66.99 

258.49 



110.52 

118.50 

104.25 

80.11 

186. 66 

260.00 

70.46 

86.55 

237.22 

125.73 

320. 83 

129.20 

115.76 

196.42 

166. 52 

138. 02 

216.00 

137.50 

95.60 

76.32 

200.00 

225.00 

137.50 

91.17 

70.68 

250. 00 



Salaeies and Term, 1908-'09. 



65 



Table IX. Salaries and Term— Continued. 



Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford- 

Rural 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Guilford College 

Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck— 

Weldon 

Enfield 

Roanoke Rapids 

Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville - 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Rural 

Swan Quarter 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville — 
Statesville 






41 

28 

88 

76 

12 

35 

212 

137 

50 

22 

3 

85 

54 

10 

9 

7 

5 

100 

90 

10 

79 

66 

13 

77 

69 

8 

39 

41 

37 

4 

148 

126 

10 

12 



White. 



0) 

^ s 



116 

80 

113 

102 

180 

80 

136 

117 

180 

156 

137 

148 

136 

178 

175 

160 

160 

89 

82 

150 

121 

110 

180 

102 

94 

175 

76 

99 

93 

160 

119 

84 

160 

170 



^5 « «! 
U u "i 



140 



130 



134 



127 



150 



114 



127 



125 



c ^ 

S Ot Sh 

15 -a I^ 

EhPlkh 



5,404.38 

3,058.50 

16,113.71 

12, 280. 37 

3,833.34 

4,626.61 

56,813.82 

29,392.28 

17,769.04 

8,602.50 

1,050.00 

22,111.76 

12,788.12 

3,330.00 

2,843.64 

1,910.00 

1,240.00 

16,489.16 

13, 693. 91 

2,795.25 

17, 799. 55 

13,427.05 

4,372.50 

11,175.00 

9,400.00 

1,775.00 

5,069.48 

4,194.69 

2,994.69 

1,200.00 

21,892.33 

14,350.93 

2,860.00 

4,681.40 






> C d S 3 OJ 



$139.23 
109.23 

183. 11 
161. 58 
319.44 
132. 18 
309.20 
214.54 
355.38 
391.02 
350-00 
260. 13 
236.81 
333. 00 
315.96 
272. 85 
248.00 
164.89 

152. 12 
279. 52 
225.31 
203. 44 
336.34 
145.12 
136. 23 
221.87 
129. 98 
102.30 

80.93 
300.00 
147. 92 
113.89 
286.00 
390.11 



go 



24 



48 
43 
5 
22 
56 
35 
10 
11 



68 

59 

2 

3 

3 

1 

28 

28 



3 

12 
10 
2 
43 
21 
21 



39 

33 

3 

3 



Colored. 



B 
(.1 

H 

0) . 



63 



91 

81 
180 

80 
120 

89 
180 
166 



113 
104 

178 
175 
160 
160 
70 
70 



180 



180 

120 

109 

175 

71 

64 

64 



75 
160 
160 



== =3 ,^ 

^4 O " 

0) .+3 
bo m M 



111 



91 



101 



4J CQ 

3S 

§ " . 

C OJ t. 

o'rt fe 



> £ 



$ 2,332.41 



5,202.08 
4, 167. 08 
1,035.00 
1,917.10 
9,865.57 
4,385.57 
2, 990. 00 
2,490.00 



120 



100 



86 



9,468.71 

7,759.96 

450. 00 

618. 75 

440.00 

200.00 

1.491.49 

1<491.49 



753.00 



W.2 



$ 98.01 



107.37 
96.90 
207.00 
87.14 
176. 17 
125.30 
299. 00 
226.30 



753.00 
1,390.00 
950.00 
440.00 
3,283.95 
2,066.55 
2,066.55 



3,989.86 

2,625.86 

544. 00 

820.00 



139.24 
131.55 
225.00 
206.25 
146.66 
200.00 
53.26 
53.26 



251.00 



251.00 
115.83 
95.00 
220.00 
76.37 
98.55 
98.55 



102.30 

79.54 

181.33 

273.33 



Part II— 5 



66 



Salaries and Tspai^ 1908-'09. 



Table IX. Salaries and Term— Continued. 



White. 



2; Eh 



Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

Smithfield 

Jones 

Lee 

Rural 

Sanford 

Lenoir 

Rural 

Kinston 

LaGrange 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincolnton 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Rural 

Williamston 

Robersonville -- 

McDowell 

Rural 

Marion 

Mecklenburg' 

Rural 

Charlotte 

Mitchell 

Mon tgomer y 

Rural 

Troy 

Moore 

Rural 

Southern Pines- 



60 
144 
132 

6 

6 
32 
49 
39 
10 
76 
50 
20 

6 
87 
76 
11 
71 
80 
57 
47 

5 

5 
61 
53 

8 
186 
110 
76 
84 
69 
65 

4 
85 
81 

4 



01 



104 

99 

92 

180 

175 

80 

91 

73 

160 

124 

98 

180 

160 

101 

93 

160 

80 

82 

103 

91 

160 

160 

96 

83 

180 

145 

120 

182 

78 

85 

80 

160 

84 

80 

172 



u u m 

2|5 

<.S43 



149 



145 



160 



143 



127 



121 
117 



160 



143 



145 



140 



137 



C c^ ^ 

^H I) 

O M S 






$ 9, 830. 55 

25, 067. 57 

21,580.07 

1,890.00 

1, 597. 50 

5,740.96 

7,618.27 

5,198-27 

2, 420. 00 

20, 599- 79 

9,278.86 

9,560.93 

1,760.00 

12, 823- 70 

9,408.60 

3,415.10 

9,784.85 

9,185.28 

9,819.01 

6,949.01 

1,710.00 

1,160.00 

10,982.47 

8,367.47 

2,615.00 

57,343.35 

22,301.63 

35,041.72 

8, 796. 00 

7,667.49 

6, 827. 49 

840.00 

10,964.23 

9,849.83 

1,114.40 



n. V 



$163.92 
174.08 
163. 48 
315.00 
266.25 
179.40 
155. 47 
133.28 
242.00 
271.05 
185.57 
478.04 
293.33 
147.30 
123.79 
310.46 
137. 81 
114.81 
154.71 
147.85 
342. 00 
232.00 
180.04 
157.87 
326. 87 
308.29 
202.74 
461.06 
104.71 
111.12 
105.38 
210.00 
128.99 
121.60 
276. 60 



Colored. 



5 a 



4 
42 
37 

2 

3 
22 
20 
20 



29 

23 

4 

2 

15 

13 

2 

4 

3 

36 

32 

3 

1 

10 

10 



74 
52 
22 

4 
21 
17 

4 
32 
32 









80 
88 
80 
180 
120 
77 
74 
74 



98 

81 

180 

135 

88 

77 

160 

80 

82 

93 

85 

160 

160 

75 

75 



113 

85 
180 
76 
95 
80 
160 
80 
80 



fcl O CO 

bo E? m 



120 



140 



91 



81 



E 0! i: 

^H 0) 

"(5 13'*^ 



418.70 
4,791.94 
3,876,94 
450. 00 
465. 00 
2,097.50 
1,627.82 
1,627.82 



3.842.24 

2,532.24 

1, 025. 00 

285.00 

1,385.05 

945. 05 

440.00 

322. 50 

287.83 

4,244.33 

3,364.33 

640.00 

240. 00 

1,110.36 

1,110.36 



10,328.33 
4,128.83 
6,199.50 

301.94 
2,082.06 
1,582.06 

500.00 
2,791.91 
2,791.91 



'5- 

2g 
« 



^1 



$104,67 
114.09 
104.78 
225. 00 
155.00 
95.34 
813. 91 
813. 91 



132. 49 

110.09 

256. 25 

142.50 

92.33 

72.69 

220. 00 

80.62 

95.94 

117.89 

105.13 

213.33 

240.00 

111.03 

111.03 



139. 16 
79.40 

281.79 
75.48 
99.14 
93.06 

125. 00 
87.24 
87.24 



Salaeies and Term^ 1908-'09. 



67 



Table IX. Salaries and Term— Continued. 



White. 



Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount--- 
Spring Hope -— 

New Hanover 

Rural 

Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Rural 

Elizabeth City- 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 

Person 

Rural 

Roxboro 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville 

Polk 

Randolph 

Rural-— — 

Ashboro 

Randleman 

Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham 

Hamlet 



5 a 
,2 " 



115 

83 

26 

6 

67 

17 

50 

70 

65 

61 

43 

48 

24 

24 

51 

35 

29 

6 

CO 

50 

10 

138 

126 

12 

36 

136 

119 

9 

8 

56 

44 

8 

4 



E 

u 
Eh 
MM 

0.S 



o «i ,/ 

fc, O M 



116 

93 

180 

160 

155 

142 

160 

89 

91 

90 

73 

134 

88 

180 

100 

90 

78 

150 

110 

100 

160 

112 

107 

156 

80 

91 

81 

160 

157 

128 

114 

180 

180 



160 



§ " • 

P ^ u 

<< in Ei 



155 

147 

115 

92 



144 



125 



160 



113 



150 



$ 26,818.33 

14,861.23 

10,494.10 

1,463.00 

24,982.20 

5,092.52 

19,889.70 

10,505.20 

10,278.44 

8,299.00 

5,008.05 

13,880.05 

3,210.25 

10, 669. 80 

8, 560. 70 

4,860.17 

3,322.67 

1,537.50 

10,740.00 

7,990.00 

2,750.00 

29,736.55 

24,914.75 

4,821.80 

4,609-70 

17,749.08 

14,349.08 

1,680.00 

1,720.00 

10,166.62 

6,226.62 

2,680.00 

1,260.00 



> C S >:! 



$233.22 
179.05 
403.23 
243.83 
372. 86 
299. 56 

357. 79 
150.07 
158. 15 
136. 04 
116.46 
289.16 
133.76 
444.57 
167.85 
138.86 
114.57 
256.25 
179. 00 

159. 80 
275.00 
215.48 
197. 73 

401. 81 
128.04 
130. 50 
120.58 
186. 60 
215.00 
181.52 
141.51 
335.00 
315.00 



Colored. 



So 



47 
39 

6 

2 
36 
13 
23 
46 
25 
24 
19 
23 
16 

7 
39 
24 
21 

3 
35 
32 

3 
57 
52 

5 
10 
25 
22 

3 



31 

27 

2 

2 



H 
be" 



92 

75 

180 

160 

150 

140 

160 

82 

80 

81 

84 

115 

81 

180 

82 

83 

74 

150 

105 

100 

160 

87 

80 

157 

80 

89 

80 

160 



101 

90 

180 

18(1 



Els 

h St 

<!.S. 



87 



90 
85 



89 



115 



4J Vi 

E C3 t. 



w .J 5 



n, U 

> E (s >- 



cS bt 



100 



120 



; 6,105.40 
4, 160. 40 
1,745.00 

200.00 
9,389.59 
2,730.00 
6,659.50 
4,984.18 
2, 036. 73 
2,297.13 
1,638.56 
3,796.35 
1,681.35 
2,115.00 
3,340.25 
2,555.25 
1,955.25 

600.00 
3,098.45 
2,522.45 

576.00 
5, 250. 75 
4,095.75 
1,155.00 

869. 70 
2,244.56 
1,644.56 

600. 00 



3,433.49 

2,443.49 

495.00 

495.00 



$129.90 

106. 67 

290.63 

100.00 

260. 82 

210.00 

289.54 

108.13 

81.46 

95.71 

86.22 

165.05 

105.08 

302. 14 

85.64 

106.46 

93.10 

200.00 

88.52 

78.82 

192.00 

92.11 

78.76 

231.00 

86.97 

89.78 

74.75 

200. 00 



110. 75 

90.49 

247.50 

247. 50 



68 



Salaries and Teem, 1908-'09. 



Table IX. Salaries and Term— Continued. 



Robeson 

Rural 

Lumberton 

Maxton 

Rockingham 

Rural 

Reidsville 

Ruffin 

Madison 

Rowan 

Rural 

Salisbury 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Rural 

Albemarle 

Stokes 

Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy 

Pilot Mountain- 
Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Rural 

Monroe 

Vance 

Rural 

Henderson 



White. 



2H 



113 

100 

8 

5 

117 

95 

12 

4 

6 

156 

130 

26 

100 

120 

114 

6 

25 

87 

78 

9 

85 

120 

103 

13 

4 

50 

40 

25 

128 

114 

14 

62 

44 

18 



0) 

V ■ 
bo" 



114 
106 
170 
176 
107 

96 
160 
140 
160 
103 

92 
160 



84 
160 
104 

88 

79 
160 

82 
"94 

83 
163 
160 

96 
108 

82 
102 

93 

180 

141 

,125 

180 






137 



176 



158 



155 



108 



120 



105 



104 



160 
139 
145 



101 



142 



S n! iH 
"St-?*' 
H^<2 



$ 27,597.96 

23. 390. 46 

2,677.50 

1,530.00 

19,547.32 

12,777.32 

4,090.00 

1,300.00 

1,380.00 

30,060.76 

18,682.76 

11,378.00 

13,533.98 

17,704.26 

16,264.26 

1,440.00 

4,778.11 

12,043.46 

9, 776. 21 

2,267.25 

9,642.19 

18,596.81 

12, 996. 81 

4,950.00 

650.00 

7,131.42 

7,196.93 

3, 615. 58 

23,826.25 

18,386.25 

5,440.00 

15,592.49 

8, 733. 99 

6,858.50 



> C rt ^- 



$244.22 
233. 90 
334. 68 
306.00 
167. 07 
134.49 
340. 83 
325.00 
230.00 
192.62 
143.71 
437.61 
135.33 
147.53 
142.67 
240.00 
191.12 
138. 43 
123. 62 
251.91 
113.43 
154. 97 
126.18 
380. 76 
162. 50 
142.62 
179.92 
144. 62 
186. 14 
161.28 
388. 56 
251.49 
198. 49 
381-03 



Colored. 






93 

*88 

3 

2 

45 

35 

6 



4 
45 
40 

5 
21 
55 
51 

4 
23 
10 
10 



10 

15 

13 

2 



2 

3 

8 

43 

40 

3 

32 

24 



<u 
<u ■ 



81 

80 

102 

100 

89 

76 

160 



100 
89 
80 

160 
89 
87 
84 

120 
85 
60 
60 



O -4-3 

ho » m 



109 



176 



90 



100 



83 

75 

62 

163 



100 



75 

117 

80 

88 

81 

180 

106 

81 

180 



92 



go . 

C CS Vi 

^H 4) 

O bJ S 



$12,290.89 

11,453.39 

550.00 

287.50 

5,016.96 

3,256.96 

1,360.00 



400. 00 
5,794.28 
4,444.28 
1,350.00 
1,602-23 
4,579.72 
4, 009. 72 

570. 00 
2,812.21 

724.49 

724.49 



798.45 

1,477.20 

945.20 

532.00 



183. 05 

501.41 

744.31 

4,813.00 

4,093.00 

720.00 

4,282.53 

2,167.53 

2,115.00 



S§3 
> E CIS ^; 



$132.16 
130.15 
183.33 
143.75 
111.48 
93.17 
226.66 



100. 00 

128.76 

111.10 

270.00 

76.29 

83.26 

78.62 

142.50 

122.27 

72.49 

72.49 



79.84 

98.48 

72.70 

266.00 



91.02 
167.13 

93.03 
111.46 
102.32 
240.00 
133.82 

90.31 
264.37 



*0f this number, 21 are for Croatan Indian schools. 



Salaries and TerM;, 1908-'09. 



69 



Table IX. Salaries and Term— Continued. 



Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive- 
Fremont 

Wilkes 

Rural 

Wilkesboro 

North Wilkes- 
boro. 
Wilson 

Rural 

Wilson City — 

Lucama 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

North Carolina -- 

Rural 

City 



^ 






187 

136 

51 

50 

36 

26 

4 

6 

85 

117 

81 

26 

6 

4 

167 

155 

5 

7 

91 

69 

19 

3 

64 

57 



8,129 
6,926 
1,203 



White. 



S 

« 

0) • 

"-I ^ 
<!.S 






121 
111 
147 
105 
101 

80 
160 
155 

80 
115 



83 
137 
160 
129 
117 
180 
160 
83 
80 



105.0 

92.7 

175.8 



134 



150 



160 



120 



88 ' 133 

I 
180 

160 

180 



101 



140 



140 
134 



o , 

V cs 

PM<H 



3 V 

Oi " 

> £ c« ^ 



$ 42,385.75 

20,887.74 

21,498.01 

8,621.00 

5, 666. 50 

3, 476. 50 

750.00 

1,440.00 

7, 126. 15 

27,241.34 

12,669.25 

11,442.09 

1,600.00 

1,530.00 

20,316.27 

17,281.27 

1,075.00 

1,960.00 

22,754-37 

13,449.37 

8,505.00 

800. 00 

8, 638. 83 

5,845.00 



1,486,998.26 

1,037,442.78 

449,555.48 



$226. 66 
153.59 
421.53 
172.42 
157.40 
131.71 
187.50 
240. 00 
183.83 
232. 83 
156.41 
440. 08 
266. 66 
382.50 
121.65 
111.49 
215.00 
280. 00 
250.04 
194. 62 
448. 05 
266.66 
134. 98 
102.54 



182.93 
149.81 
373.60 



5 a 



107 

81 

26 

46 

25 

20 

2 

3 

3 

57 

39 

11 

5 

2 

23 

22 



1 
39 

28 

10 

1 



Colored. 



2.828 

2,444 

384 



V 

H 

o • 
bi" 



94 

76 

147 

81 

95 

80 

160 

155 

80 

111 

82 

180 

160 

180 

79 

75 



160 
122 
101 
180 
120 
75 
80 



91.9 

81.2 

161.3 



£"5 • 

fci O M 

bJ3 " m 
2|5 



S3 



83 



160 



102 



86 



c ^ 



c ra fc. 



> £ rt fe 



$12,090.71 

5,986.33 

6, 104. 38 

3,769.00 

2,362.50 

1,612.50 

300.00 

450.00 

170.00 

8,267.40 

3, 736. 00 

3,269.40 

905.00 

357.00 

2,165.58 

1,965.58 



200. 00 

7", 635. 99 

4, 277. 49 

3,178.50 

180.00 

596.25 

200.00 



321,034.45 

227,512.98 

93,521.47 



112. 99 

73.90 

234.77 

81.93 

94.50 

80.62 

150.00 

150.00 

56.66 

145. 91 

95.79 

297.21 

181.00 

178.50 

94.15 

89.34 



200.00 
195.79 
152. 76 
317. 85 
180.00 
74.53 
100.00 



113.52 

93.09 

240.94 



E. SCHOOLHOUSES, DISTRICTS, AND SCHOOLS. 



TABLE X. SCHOOL PROPERTY 1908-'09. 

This table shows by races the number and value of public schoolhouses and 
grounds, rural and city. 

SUMMAEY OF TABLE X AND COMPARISON WITH 1907-'08. 



Total value all school property, 1908-'09 

Total value all school property, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Value white school property, 1908-'09 

Value white school property, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Value colored school property, 1908- '09 

Value colored school property, 1907- '08 

Increase 

Total number schoolhouses, 1908-'09 

Total number schoolhouses, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Number white schoolhouses, 1908-'O9 

Number white schoolhouses, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Number colored schoolhouses, 1908-'09 

Number colored schoolhouses, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Average value each schoolhouse, 1908-'09— 

Average value each schoolhouse, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Average value each schoolhouse (white), 1908-'09 — 
Average value each schoolhouse (white), 1907-'08 — 

Increase 

Average value each schoolhouse (colored), 1908-'09- 
Average value each schoolhouse (colored), 1907-'08- 

Increase 




City. 



North 
Carolina. 



2, 846. 998 

2,508,671 

338,327 

2,487,614 

2,170,394 

317,220 

359,384 

338.277 

21,107 

7,401 

7,282 

119 

5,189 

5,104 

85 

2,212 

2,178 

34 

384 

344 

40 

479 

425 

54 

162 

156 

6 



2,588,791 I $ 

2,408,641 

180, 150 

2,303,926 

2,111,861 

192,065 

284,865 

296,780 

*11,915 

269 

255 

14 

173 

164 

9 

96 

91 

5 

9,623 

9,445 

178 

13,317 

12,877 

440 

2,965 

3,262 

297 



$ 



5,435,789 

4,917,312 

518, 477 

4,791,540 

4,282,255 

509, 285 

644,249 

635, 057 

9,192 

7,670 

7,537 

133 

5,362 

5,268 

94 

2,308 

2,269 

39 

708 

642 

66 

893 

810 

83 

279 

248 

31 



•Decrease. 



School Property, 1908-'09. 



71 



Table X. School Fropbrty— Continued. 



Alamance 

Rural 

Burlington - 

Graham 

Haw River - 

Mebane 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Rural 

Wadesboro - 

Ashe 

Beaufort 

Rural 

Washington 
Belhaven — 

Bertie 

Rural 

Aulander — 

Windsor 

Bladen 

Brunswick — 

Buncombe 

Rural 

Asheville — 

Burke 

Rural 

Morganton - 

Cabarrus 

Rural 

Concord 

Caldwell 

Rural 

Lenoir 

Granite 

Rhodhiss — 



White. 



Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 



60 

54 

3 

1 

1 

1 

49 

41 

45 

43 

2 

99 

78 

76 

1 

1 

64 

62 

1 

1 

70 

49 

98 

89 

9 

52 

51 

1 

45 

43 

2 

72 

69 

1 

1 

1 



Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 



77, 040 

32,265 

16,500 

16, 775 

6,000 

5,500 

4,800 

23, 600 

41,700 

25,700 

16,000 

30, 000 

66, 900 

19,900 

45, 000 

2,000 

47, 800 

23, 800 

4,000 

20,000 

30, 335 

12, 175 

171,605 

66,405 

105,200 

37,100 

12,100 

25,000 

92,350 

29, 350 

63, 000 

41,607 

19,407 

18,000 

3,000 

1,200 



Colored. 



Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 



29 

26 

1 

1 



1 

5 

3 

41 

40 

1 

10 

34 

33 

1 



56 
55 



1 

46 

25 

18 

13 

5 

9 

8 

1 

23 

22 

1 

16 

14 

2 



Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 



$ 5,520 

3,260 

1,500 

560 



200 

309 

300 

10,700 

8,700 

2,000 

500 

9,061 

4,061 

5,000 



10,480 
10,080 



400 
4,088 
4,150 

17, 355 
2,110 

15,245 
2,700 
1,700 
1,000 
8,075 
3,075 
5,000 
1.741 
1.091 
650 



Total 
Houses. 


Total 
Value. 


89 


$ 82,560 


80 


35,525 


4 


18,000 


2 


17,335 


1 


6,000 


2 


5,700 


54 


5,109 


52 


23,900 


86 


52,400 


83 


34,400 


3 


18,000 


109 


30,500 


112 


75,961 


109 


23,961 


2 


50,000 


1 


2,000 


120 


58,280 


117 


33,880 


1 


4,000 


2 


20,400 


116 


34,423 


74 


16,325 


116 


188,960 


102 


68,515 


14 


120,445 


61 


39,800 


59 


13,800 


2 


26,000 


68 


100,425 


65 


32,425 


3 


68,000 


88 


43,348 


83 


20,498 


3 


18,650 


1 


3,000 


1 


1.200 



T2 



School Pkopeety, 1908-'09. 



Table X. School Proferty— Continued. 



Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Rural 

Hickory 

Newton 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Rural 

Andrews 

Murphy 

Chowan 

Rural 

Edenton 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Rural 

Shelby 

Kings Mountain 

Columbus 

Craven 

Rural 

New Bern 

Cumberland 

Rural 

Fayetteville 

Hope Mills 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Rural 

Lexington 

, Thomasville 

Davie 

Duplin 



White. 



Colored. 



Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 


Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 


Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 


Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 


19 


$ 8,200 


12 


$ 1,400 


40 


20,380 


8 


1.975 


40 


10,000 


38 


3,750 


77 


57,690 


18 


4.500 


75 


28, 190 


16 


3,000 


1 


15,000 


1 


1,000 


1 


14, 500 


1 


500 


72 


25,000 


37 


3,000 


62 


49,980 


2 


1,500 


57 


30,980 


1 


500 


4 


14,000 


1 


1,000 


1 


5,000 






20 


18,000 


15 


4,000 


19 


6,000 


15 


4,000 


1 


12, 000 






16 


6,000 






75 


68.150 


23 


2,450 


73 


30, 150 


21 


1,100 


1 


35,000 


1 


1,000 


1 


3,000 


1 


350 


87 


50,060 


36 


4,955 


50 


96,600 


33 


14,590 


47 


16,600 


32 


4.590 


3 


80,000 


1 


10,000 


75 


86,000 


54 


13,700 


72 


48,500 


53 


8.700 


2 


30,000 


»1 


5,000 


1 


7,500 






33 


20,000 


14 


1,483 


19 


6,000 


3 


75 


89 


47,935 


18 


3,908 


87 


17,935 


16 


1,508 


1 


20,000 


1 


1,200 


1 


10,000 


1 


1,200 


34 


11,310 


11 


1,150 


72 


7,000 


40 


2,000 



Total 
Houses. 



31 

48 

78 

95 

91 

2 

2 

109 

64 

58 

5 

1 

35 

34 

1 

16 

98 

94 

2 

2 

123 

83 

79 

4 

129 

125 

3 

1 

47 

22 

107 

103 

2 

2 

45 

112 



Total 
Value. 



9,600 
22,355 
13,750 
62, 190 
31,190 
16,000 
15,000 
28,000 
51,480 
31,480 
15, 000 

5,000 
22, 000 
10,000 
12,000 

6.000 
70, 600 
31,250 
36,000 

3,350 
55,015 
111,190 
21,190 
90,000 
99,700 
57,200 
35, 000 

7,500 
21,483 

6,075 
51.843 
19,443 
21,200 
11,200 
12,460 

9,000 



School Peopeety, 1908-'09. 



i o 



Table X. School Property— Continued. 



Durham 

Rural 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Rural 

Tarboro 

Forsyth 

Rural 

Winston 

Kernersville 

Franklin 

Rural 

Franklin ton 

Louisburg 

Youngsville 

Gaston 

Rural 

Gastonia 

Cherryville 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford 

Rural 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Guilford College 

Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck - 

Weldon 

Enfield 

Roanoke Rapids 



White. 



Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 



31 

26 

5 

43 

39 

4 

85 

80 

4 

1 

45 

42 

1 

1 

1 

63 

61 

1 

1 

31 

22 

51 

49 

2 

28 

91 

82 

6 

2 

1 

47 

42 

1 

1 

2 

1 



Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 



$ 215,500 

40,500 

175, 000 

22, 100 

17, 600 

4,500 
185,500 
45, 500 
130,000 
10, 000 
71,010 
24,010 
17, 000 
25, 000 

5,000 
79,179 
45, 179 
30,000 

4,000 
13,000 

4,600 
31,080, 
24, 830 

6,250 
13,950 
243. 125 
79, 125 
85,000 
75, 000 

4,000 
63, 343 
13,310 
19,000 
15,033 

6,000 
10, 000 



Colored. 



Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 



18 
16 

2 
38 
35 

3 
23 
21 

1 

1 
38 
36 



1 
1 

30 

29 

1 



Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 



30, 500 
5,500 

25,000 

11,000 
8,000 
3,000 

24, 500 
8,500 

15, 000 
1,000 
7,980 
3,480 



4,000 
500 
8,090 
4,090 
4,000 



23 


2,500 


1 


25 


43 


6,603 


41 


4,203 


2 


2,400 


19 


2,875 


31 


23, 160 


29 


8,160 


2 


15,000 



52 


14,830 


48 


9,470 


1 


1,000 


1 


2,360 


1 


1,000 


1 


1,000 



Total 
Houses. 



49 

42 

7 

81 

74 

7 

108 

101 

5 

2 

83 

78 

1 

2 

2 

93 

90 

2 

1 

54 

23 

94 

90 

4 

47 

122 

111 

8 

2 

1 

99 

90 

2 

2 

3 

2 



Total 
Value. 



246,000 
46,000 

200, 000 

33, 100 

25, 600 

7,500 

210,000 
54,000 

145, 000 

11,000 

78, 990 

27,490 

17,000 

29,000 

5,500 

87,269 

49,269 

34, 000 

4,000 

15,500 

4,625 

37,683 

29,033 

8,650 

16,825 

266,285 
87,285 

100, 000 
75,000 
4,000 
78, 173 
22,780 
20,000 
17,393 
7.000 
11,000 



74 



School Pkoperty, 1908-'09. 



Table X. School Property— Continued. 



Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville — 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Rural 

Swan Quarter- 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville 

Statesville 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

• Smithfield 

Jones 

Lee 

Rural — 

Sanford 

Lenoir 

Rural 

Kinston 

LaGrange 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincoln ton 

Macon 



White. 



Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 



59 
58 

1 
52 
50 

2 
47 
46 

1 
32 
25 
24 

1 
90 
88 

1 

1 

44 

109 

107 

1 

1 
27 
29 
28 

1 

42 
39 

2 

1 
58 
57 

1 
59 



Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 



53,075 
38, 075 
15, 000 
45, 000 
25. 000 
20,000 
43,340 
31.340 
12,000 
7,500 
17, 075 
15,075 
2,000 
90, 538 
30,538 
25, 000 
35,000 
32,515 
50, 895 
43,395 
2,500 
5,900 
8,100 
22, 700 
6,200 
16,500 
63.000 
24, 000 
28,000 
11, 000 
39, 542 
19,542 
20,000 
18,670 



Colored. 



Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 



27 
27 



2 

1 

1 

9 

8 

1 

33 

19 

18 

1 

32 

30 

1 

1 

3 

38 
36 
1 
1 
17 
12 
12 



25 

23 

1 

1 

13 

12 

1 

4 



Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 



3,255 
3,255 



1,200 

600 

600 

2,200 

1,200 

1,000 

5,000 

2,410 

2,210 

200 

9,600 

5,600 

200 

3,800 

1,450 

7,425 

5,825 

600 

1,000 

1,850 

1,300 

1,300 



7,800 
4,300 
2,500 
1,000 
3,600 
2,600 
1,000 
375 



Total 
Houses. 



Total 
Value. 



86 
85 

1 
54 
51 

3 

56 
54 

2 
65 
44 
42 

2 
122 
118 

2 

2 

47 

147 

143 

2 

2 
44 
41 
40 

1 
67 
62 

3 

2 
71 
69 

2 
63 



56,330 
41,330 
15,000 
46,200 
25,600 
20, 600 
45,540 
32,540 
13,000 
12,500 
19, 485 
17,285 
2,200 
100,138 
36, 138 
25,200 
38, 800 
33, 965 
58,320 
49,220 
3,100 
6,000 
9,950 
24, 000 
7,500 
16, 500 
70,800 
28, 300 
30, 500 
12, 000 
43,142 
22, 142 
21, 000 
19,045 



School Pkoperty, 1908-'09. 



75 



Table X. School Froperty— Continued. 



Madison 

Martin 

Rural 

Williamston — 
Roberson ville- - 

McDowell 

Rural 

Marion 

Mecklenburg 

Rural 

Charlotte 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Rural 

Troy 

Moore 

Rural 

Southern Pines 

Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount -- 

Spring Hope — 

New Hanover — 

Rural 

Wilmington — 
Northampton — 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Rural 

Elizabeth City- 
Pender 



White. 



Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 



68 
45 
43 

1 

1 
57 
56 

1 

79 
69 
10 
62 
59 
58 

1 
61 
60 

1 
54 
50 

2 

2 
17 
14 

3 
41 
52 
39 
22 
24 
21 

3 
39 



Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 



27, 285 
30, 500 
22,000 

5,000 

3,500 
56, 300 
40.300 
16,000 
207, 153 
72, 153 
135,000 
18,250 
12,461 
10,961 

1,500 
55, 065 
43,065 
12, 000 
87,675 
34, 675 
45,000 

8,000 
92,725 

7,725 
85, 000 
14,750 
17, 000 
20. 665 
20,000 
66,500 
11,500 
55, 000 
25, 000 



Colored. 



Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 



3 
30 
28 
1 
1 
9 
9 



59 

56 

3 

3 

19 

17 

2 

22 

22 



38 
35 

1 

2 
13 
11 

2 
43 
20 
25 
13 
18 
16 

2 
33 



Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 



600 

10, 150 

8,000 

1,500 

650 
1,200 
1,200 



14,985 
7,485 
7,500 
450 
2,820 
1,820 
1,000 
2,575 
2.575 



13.000 

7,200 

5,000 

800 

16,200 
5,200 

11,000 
2,650 
2,250 
4,395 
1,700 
8,325 
4,325 
4,000 
5,000 



Total 
Houses. 



71 
75 
71 

2 

2 
66 
65 

1 
138 
125 
13 
65 
78 
75 

3 
83 
82 

1 

92 
85 

3 

4 

300 

25 

5 
84 
72 
64 
35 
42 
37 

5 
72 



Total 
Value. 



27, 885 
40, 650 
30,000 
6,500 
4,150 
57, 500 
4] , 500 
16,000 

222. 138 
79,638 

142, 500 
18,700 
15,281 
12,781 
2,500 
57, 640 
45,640 
12,000 

100.675 

41,875 

50. 000 

8,800 

108,925 
12, 925 
96, 000 
17, 400 
19,250 
25,060 
21,700 
74,825 
15, 825 
59,000 
30,000 



76 



School Property, 1908-'09. 



Table X. School Property — Continued. 



Perquimans — 

Rural 

Hertford 

Person 

Rural 

Roxboro 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville — 

Polk 

Randolph 

Rural 

Ashboro 

Randleman-- 

Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham - 
Hamlet 

Robeson 

Rural 

Lumberton - - 
Maxton 

Rockingham — 

Rural 

Reidsville — 

Ruffin 

Madison 

Rowan 

Rural 

Salisbury 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 



White. 



Number 

of 
School - 
houses. 



27 

26 

1 

47 

45 

2 

81 

80 

1 

28 

97 

94 

2 

1 

29 

27 

1 

1 

82 

79 

1 

2 

79 

73 

2 

2 

2 

84 

82 

2 

75 

91 

90 

1 



Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 



24, 500 

9,500 
15,000 
31.360 
11,360 
20, 000 
100,000 
75,000 
25, 000 

3,983 
86,102 
46, 102 
25, 000 
15, 000 
36, 100 
10,600 
18,000 

7,500 
87, 685 
48, 185 
35, 000 

4,500 
69, 517 
39,217 
25, 000 

1,300 

4,000 
91,960 
51,960 
40, 000 
35,006 
46, 900 
43, 400 

3,500 



Colored. 



Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 



19 
18 

1 

33 
32 

1 
52 
51 

1 

7 
17 
16 

1 



22 

20 

1 

1 

81 

*79 

1 

1 

46 

42 

1 

1 

2 

33 

32 

1 

23 

50 

50 



Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 



8,000 

3,000 

5,000 

4,595 

1,995 

2,600 

20, 500 

15,500 

5,000 

1,000 

903 

403 

500 



7,150 

4,900 

1,750 

500 

21,025 

15,025 
5,000 
1,000 
9,706 
5,456 
3,000 
250 
1,000 

14, 950 
4,950 

10,000 
3,240 
7,000 
7,000 



Total 
Houses. 



46 

44 

2 

80 

77 

3 

133 

131 

2 

35 

114 

110 

3 

1 

51 

47 

2 

2 

163 

158 

2 

3 

125 

115 

3 

3 

4 

117 

114 

3 

98 

141 

140 

1 



Total 
Value. 



32, 500 
12, 500 
20, 000 
35. 955 
13,355 
22,600 
120,500 
90, 500 
30, 000 

4,983 
87, 005 
46, 505 
25, 500 
15,000 
43,250 
15, 500 
19,750 

8,000 

108,710 

63,210 

40, 000 

5,500 
79, 223 
44,673 
28,000 

1,550 

5,000 
106,910 
56, 910 
50,000 
38,246 
53, 900 
50,400 

3,500 



*0f these, 22 are for Croatan Indians. 



School Property, 1908-'09. 



Y7 



Table X. School Property— Continued. 



Scotland 

Stanly — 

Rural 

Albemarle 

Stokes 

Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy 

Pilot Mountain 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Rural 

Monroe 

Vance 

Rural - 

Henderson 

Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive 

Fremont 

Wilkes 

Rural 

Wilkesboro 

North Wilkesboro • 



White. 



Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 



23 

58 

57 

1 

65 

91 

88 

2 

1 

43 

28 

25 

84 

83 

1 

27 

23 

4 

97 

88 

9 

34 

27 

25 

1 

1 

68 

72 

65 

4 

2 

1 

127 

124 

2 

1 



Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 



5,820 

27, 050 

17,050 

10,000 

25, 100 

49,300 

26,800 

20,000 

2,500 

19, 975 

23, 860 

7,425 

31,485 

19, 485 

12,000 

■ 44,875 

16,875 

28,000 

221,015 

106, 847 

114,168 

23,765 

15, 854 

3,354 

5,000 

7,500 

15, 000 

83, 390 

35, 890 

30, 000 

10, 500 

7,000 

39,535 

35,035 

1,000 

3,500 



Colored. 



Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 



22 
6 
6 



10 

14 

13 

1 



Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 



2 

1 

9 
37 
36 

1 
24 
21 

3 
66 
62 

4 
42 
18 
17 

1 



2 

42 

38 

2 

1 

1 

18 

17 



3,000 
900 
900 



1,900 

1,850 

1,300 

550 



100 

250 

1,600 

6,190 

4,690 

1,500 

20,200 

2,200 

18,000 

55,220 

19, 720 

35,500 

6,245 

2,378 

1,878 

500 



200 
16, 300 
7,300 
5,000 
3,000 
1,000 
2,129 
1,829 



300 



Total 
Houses. 



45 

64 

63 

1 

75 

105 

101 

3 

1 

45 

29 

34 

121 

119 

2 

51 

44 

7 

163 

150 

13 

76 

45 

42 

2 

1 

70 

114 

103 

6 

3 

2 

145 

141 

2 

2 



Total 
Value. 



8,820 

27, 950 

17, 950 

10,000 

27,000 

51, 150 

28,100 

20, 550 

2,500 

20, 075 

24,110 

9,025 

37,675 

24, 175 

13,500 

65,075 

19,075 

46, 000 

276,235 

126, 567 

149, 668 

30. 010 

18, 232 

5,232 

5,500 

7,500 

15,200 

99. 690 

43, 190 

35,000 

13, 500 

8,000 

41,664 

36, 864 

1,000 

3.800 



78 



School Pkoperty, 1908-'09. 



Table X. School Property— Continued. 



Wilson 

Rural 

Wilson City - 

Lucama 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

North Carolina 

Rural 

City 



White. 



Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 



5.362 
5,189 



Total 

Value of 

School 

Property. 



54 $ 69,500 



51 


27,500 


2 


32,000 


1 


10,000 


52 


16,000 


36 


8,495 



4,791,540 
2,487,614 



173 2,303,926 



Colored. 



Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 



Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 



Total 
Houses. 



28 
26 
1 
1 
6 
2 



21, 700 
9,200 

12,000 
500 
500 
275 



2,308 

2,212 

96 



644, 249 
359.384 

284,865 



7,670 

7,401 

269 



Total 
Value. 



82 I $ 
77 

3 

2 
58 
38 



91,200 
36,700 
44,000 
10, 500 
16,500 
8,770 



5, 435, 789 
2,846,998 
2,588,791 




Z 
O 

a 
z 

o 

« 
a 
> 
o 
P 



o 
o 
K 

w 

W 
o 

M 
ffl 



1^ 

N 
D 
Pa 

D 



Log Houses and Districts, 1908-'09. 



79 



TABLE XI. LOG SCHOOLHOUSES, DISTRICTS, AND DISTRICTS 
WITHOUT HOUSES, 1908'-09. 

This table shows the number of districts, the number of log school houses, 
and the number of districts without schoolhouses, by counties and by races. 

SuMMAEi' OF Table XI and Comparison with 1907-'08. 



1907-'08. 



Number of school districts 

White 

Colored 

Number of log schoolhouses 

White 

Colored 

Number of districts having- no house 

White 

Colored 



7.631 
5,333 
2,298 
306 
111 
195 
379 
247 
132 



1908-'09. 



Decrease. 



7,670 
5,356 
2,314 
283 
102 
181 
345 
207 
138 



*39 
*23 
*16 

23 
9 

14 
•34 

40 

*6 



Alamance — 
Alexander — 
Alleghany-— 

Anson 

Ashe 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick — 

Buncombe 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

*Increase 



White. 



School 
Districts. 



54 
52 
41 
42 
99 
75 
63 
70 
41 
98 
53 
47 
66 
20 
44 
42 
77 
80 
51 



Districts 
Having 

Log 
Houses. 



Districts 
Having 

No 
House. 



Colored. 



School 
Districts. 



26 

6 

3 

41 

10 

33 

55 

46 

27 

17 

10 

22 

14 

12 

8 

38 

18 

38 

3 



Districts 
Having 

Log 
Houses. 



24 
4 
3 



Districts 
Having 

No 
House. 



Decrease in 

School Districts. 



White. 



*1 
- 1 



*2 



*3 
*2 



Colored. 



*2 



*1 



*2 
1 
4 

*1 



80 



Log Houses axd Districts, 1908-'09. 



Table XI. Log Schoolhouses, Districts, etc.— Continued. 



School 
Districts. 



Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Columbus — 

Craven 

Cumberland - 
Currituck — 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe — 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson -_ 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 

*Increase 



19 
17 
69 
90 
46 
72 
33 
19 
93 
43 
72 
26 
39 
80 
44 
65 
31 
20 
52 
31 
85 
49 

. 61 
53 
52 
31 
27 
92 
44 

110 
28 
36 
39 
59 
59 



White. 



Districts 
Having 

Log 
Houses. 



Colored. 



Districts 
Having i School 

No i Districts. 
House. 



15 

1 
21 
38 
33 
55 
14 

1 
16 
13 
41 
16 
35 
21 
36 
24 
23 

1 
42 
20 
32 
59 
30 

1 

10 
33 
19 
33 

3 
37 
20 
17 
23 
13 

4 



Districts 
Having 

Log 
Houses. 



11 



Districts 
Having 

No 
House. 



Decrease in 
School Districts. 



White. 



Colored. 



1 
*1 



1 
1 

*4 
1 



4 
*36 



*2 



Log Houses and Districts, 1908-'09. 



81 



Table XI. Log Schoolhouses, Districts, etc.— Continued. 



Madison 71 

Martin 43 

McDowell 55 

Mecklenburg 72 

Mitchell 73 

Montgomery 60 

Moore 68 

Nash 51 

New Hanover 14 

Northampton 43 

Onslow 52 

Orange 42 

Pamlico 23 

Pasquotank 21 

Pender 44 

Perquimans 26 

Person 41 

Pitt - 81 

Polk 33 

Randolph 100 

Richmond 35 

Robeson 82 

Rockingham 70 

Rowan 83 

Rutherford 78 

Sampson 90 

Scotland 23 

Stanly 61 

Stokes 67 

Surry 88 

Swain 45 

Transylvania 30 

Tyrrell 25 

Union 83 

'Increase. 

Part II— 6 



White. 



School 
Districts. 



Districts 
Having 

Log 
Houses. 



Districts 
Having 

No 
House. 



5 i 

4 

1 



Colored. 



School 
Districts. 



4 
28 
12 
56 
4 
18 
29 
37 
12 
44 
21 
22 
14 
16 
38 
18 
32 
51 
10 
21 
24 
89 
35 
40 
23 
50 
20 
11 
10 
13 
2 
2 
9 
38 



Districts 
Having 

Log 
Houses. 



16 



Districts 
Having 

No 
House. 



Decrease in 
School Districts. 



White. 



*1 
2 



*2 

23 

2 



1 

*1 



*3 



*2 
1 

*4 



Colored. 



*3 



*2 

12 
1 



*1 
*1 

*1 



1 
*2 

1 

*3 
*1 



82 



Log Houses ais'd Districts, 100S-'09. 



Table XI. Log Schoolhouses, Districts, etc.— Continued. 



Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Total — . 



White. 



School 
Districts. 



22 

88 
33 
25 
71 
65 
128 
47 
54 
49 



Districts 
Having 

Log 
Houses. 



Colored. 



Districts ' Districts ] Districts 

Having School Having Having 

No Districts. Log No 

House. Houses. House. 



5,356 



1 

7 
102 



4 
1 
1 
3 

4 
1 
3 

14 
207 



21 
61 
39 
18 
3 

38 

17 

26 

9 

2 

2,314 



Decrease in 
School Districts. 



White. 



Colored. 



1 
*1 



181 



138 



*23 



*1 
1 

*3 
1 



*I6 



♦Increase. 



Kinds of Rural Schools^, 190S-'09. 



83 



TABLE XII. NUMBER OF WHITE RURAL SCHOOLS, ETC., 1908-'09. 

This table shows the number of white rural scliools, the school poimlatiou 
and the land area of the counties, the number of white rural schools having 
only one teacher, the number of white rural schools having two or more teach- 
ers, and the number of white rural schools in which some high-school subjects 
are taught. 

Summary of Table XII and Comparison with 1907-'0S. 



White. 



Number of rui-al white schools j 

Rural white school population 

Land area of State 

Average area covered by each rural school 

School population to each rural school 

Number of schools having only one teacher 

Number of schools having two or more teachers — 

Number of schools in which some high-school sub 
jects are taught 



1907-'08. 



5,302 

406,156 

48, 580 

9.1 

76 

4,177 

1,139 

909 



1908-'09. 



5,371 

410,659 

48,580 

9.0 

76 

4,120 

1, 251 

1,013 



Increase. 



69 

4,503 



*57 
112 

104 



Alamance - 
Alexander - 
Alleghany-■ 

Anson 

Ashe 

Beaufort -- 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick 
Buncombe - 

Burke 

Cabarrus -- 
Caldwell- -- 
Camden — 
Carteret — 

Caswell 

Catawba -- 
Chatham - - 



Number 

of 

Rural 

White 

Schools. 


Rural 
White 
School 
Popula- 
tion. 


Land 
Area of 

the 
County. 


Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Only 

One 

Teacher. 


Number 
of Rural 
Schools 
Having 
Two or 
More 
Teachers. 


Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 

Some High 

School 

Subjects 

Are 
Taught. 


54 


4,155 


494 


31 


23 


14 


52 


3,767 


297 


40 


12 


5 


39 


2,969 


223 


30 


■ 9 


5 


46 


3,226 


551 


41 


5 


14 


98 


7,242 


399 


78 


20 


25 


75 


4,128 


819 


69 


6 


12 


62 


2,808 


712 


57 


5 


4 


69 


2,977 


1,013 


65 


4 


12 


41 


2,535 


812 


37 


4 


5 


97 


9,884 


624 


75 


22 


22 


52 


4,856 


534 


46 


6 


5 


51 


4,291 


387 


32 


19 


5 


72 
20 


4,755 
1.196 


507 

218 


"ifi 


16 




15 


5 


3 


41 


3,461 


538 


34 


7 


3 


43 


2,331 


396 


36 


7 


6 


77 


6,766 


408 


49 


28 


45 


80 


5,132 




72 


8 


9 



84 



Kinds of Eueal Schools^ 1908-'09. 



Table XII. Number op White Schools— Continued. 



Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland — 
Columbus -- 

Craven 

Cumberland • 
Currituck — 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe-. 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson — 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 



Number 

of 

Rural 

White 

Schools. 



51 
19 
15 
67 
116 
47 
72 
33 
19 
93 
43 
72 
28 
39 
80 
46 
66 
31 
24 
52 
30 
84 
49 
59 
50 
52 
33 
29 
91 
43 
108 
28 
36 
39 
57 



Rural 
White 
School 
Popula- 
tion. 



5,016 
1,157 
1,430 
6,658 
6,018 
2,249 
5.018 
1,802 
1,486 
6,588 
3,719 
4,905 
3,643 
2,207 
7,074 
3,260 
7,316 
1,964 
1,637 
3,499 
2,180 
8,891 
2.371 
4,930 
5,115 
3,994 
2,165 
1,657 
6,637 
4,461 
9,292 
1,474 
1,944 
2,248 
4,256 



Land 
Area of 

the 
County. 



451 
161 
185 
485 
937 
685 
1,008 
273 
405 
563 
264 
830 
284 
515 
369 
471 
359 
356 
302 
504 
258 
674 
681 
596 
541 
362 
339 
596 
592 
494 
688 
403 



. Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Only 

One 

Teacher. 



436 
296 



34 
18 
13 
31 
91 
43 
56 
25 
13 
84 
36 
55 
13 
35 
58 
32 
50 
24 
17 
33 
27 
52 
44 
43 
36 
37 
24 
22 
56 
31 
89 
24 
31 
28 
41 



Number 
of Rural 
Schools 
Having 
Two or 
More 
Teachers. 



17 

1 

2 

36 

25 

4 

16 

8 

6 

9 

7 

17 

15 

4 

22 

14 

16 

7 

7 

19 

3 

32 

5 

16 

14 

15 

9 

7 

35 

12 

19 

4 

5 

11 

16 



Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 

Some High 

School 

Subjects 

Are 
Taught. 



3 
2 
2 

12 
25 

19 
3 
8 
3 
8 
9 

24 
6 
5 
5 

17 
8 
5 

18 
3 

10 
2 

14 
8 
7 
6 

10 

19 

15 
9 

10 
7 

17 

15 



Kinds of Kueal Schools, 1908-'09. 



85 



Table XII. Number of White Schooi^s— Continued. 



Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg - 

Mitchell 

Montgomery -■ 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 
Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank — 

Pender 

Perquimans — 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham — 

Rowan 

Rutherford — 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly — - 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania - 

Tyrrell 

Union 



Number 

of 

Rural 

White 

Schools. 



58 
67 
43 
54 
70 
72 
59 
66 
51 
14 
43 
52 
42 
21 
21 
44 
26 
47 
80 
33 
100 
35 
82 
68 
82 
78 
90 
23 
61 
66 
86 
47 
29 
25 
84 



Rural 
White 
School 
Popula- 
tion. 



4,127 
7,723 
2,430 
4,638 
6.739 
6,324 
3,904 
3,827 
4,876 
814 
2,802 
3,176 
3,142 
2,164 
1,223 
2,223 
1,533 
2,991 
5,875 
2,119 
7,592 
2,851 
6,643 
7,442 
7,798 
7,211 
6,313 
1,508 
4,851 
6,058 
8,204 
3,053 
2,118 
1,088 
6,609 



Land 
Area of 

the 
County. 



531 
431 
438 
437 
590 
362 
489 



584 
199 
523 
645 
386 
358 
231 
883 
251 
386 
644 
258 
795 
466 
1,043 
573 
483 
547 
921 
387 
413 
472 
531 
560 
371 
397 
561 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Only 

One 

Teacher. 



50 
55 
39 
46 
40 
57 
54 
60 
26 
11 
21 
44 
25 
7 
18 
38 
24 
44 
59 
31 
83 
28 
48 
47 
44 
57 
68 
21 
46 
49 
72 
41 
23 
25 
64 



Number 

of Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Two or 

More 

Teachers. 



Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 

Some High 

School 

Subjects 

Are 
Taught. 



12 

4 

8 

30 

15 

5 

6 

25 

3 

22 

8 

17 

14 

3 

6 

2 

3 

21 

2 

17 

7 

34 

21 

38 

21 

22 

2 

15 

17 

14 

6 

6 



20 



3 

9 

10 
8 

32 
4 
5 
6 

20 
5 

22 
2 
8 
5 

10 
2 
1 

25 

18 

7 

34 

21 

17 

15 

18 

13 

7 

1 

16 

2 

6 

19 

10 



86- 



KlA^DS OF EUEAL ScHOOLS;, 1908-'09. 



Table XII. Number of White ScHOOVS—Contimied. 



Number 


Rural 


of 


White 


Rural 


School 


White 


Popula 


Schools. 


tion. 



Land 
Area of 

the 
County. 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Only 

One 

Teacher. 



Number 

of Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Two or 

More 

Teachers. 



Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 

Some High 

School 

Subjects 

Are 
Taught. 



Vance 

Wake-- 

Warren 

Washington 
Watauga -— 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Total — 



23 


1,562 


88 


7,360 


36 


2,335 


25 


1,292 


72 


5,129 


65 


4.514 


124 


9,265 


49 


3,728 


53 


4,936 


47 


4,354 



276 
841 
432 
334 
330 
597 
718 
392 
334 
302 



9 
54 
30 
24 
58 
55 
100 
34 
42 
40 



14 

34 

6 

1 

14 

10 

24 

15 

11 

7 



5,371 I 410,659 



48,580 



4,120 



1,251 



7 

27 

8 

1 

8 

10 

23 

4 

7 

9 

1,013 



Kinds of Kukal Schools^ 1908-'09. 



8Y 



TABLE XIII. NUMBER OF COLORED RURAL SCHOOLS, ETC., 1908-'09. 

This table shows the number of colored rural schools, the school population 
and the land area of the counties, the number of colored rural schools having 
only one teacher, the number of colored rural schools having: two or more 
teachers, and the number of colored rural schools in which some high-school 
subjects ai-e taught. 

Summary of Table XIII and Comparison with 1907-'08. 



Colored. 



1907-'08. 



Number of colored rural schools — 

Colored rural school population 

Land area of State 

Average area covered by each rural school 

School population to each school 

Number of schools having only one teacher 

Number of schools having two or more teachers 

Number of schools in which some high-school suh 
jects are taught 



2,234 

184,394 

48,580 

21.7 

82 

2,071 

163 

66 



1908-'09. 



2,280 

187,998 

48, 580 

21.3 

82 

2,088 

192 

93 



Increase. 



46 
3,604 



17 
29 

27 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Colored 

Schools. 



Rural 
Colored 

School 
Popula- 
tion. 



Land 
Area of 

the 
County. 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Only 

One 

Teacher. 



Number 

of Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Two or 

More 

Teachers. 



Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 

Some High 

School 

Subjects 

Are 
Taught. 



Alamance -. 
Alexander-. 
Alleghany-. 

Anson 

Ashe 

Beaufort --. 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick 
Buncombe - 

Burke 

Cabarrus -- 
Caldwell- 
Camden — 
Carteret — 

Caswell 

Catawba — 
Chatham -- 



26 
5 
3 

43 
10 
33 
54 
46 
26 
15 

8 
21 
13 
12 

7 
38 
17 
36 



1,919 

287 

152 

4,048 

225 

2,634 

4,378 

2,808 

1,764 

1,082 

590 

1,625 

547 

932 

714 

2,611 

793 

2,927 



494 
297 
223 
551 
399 
819 
712 
1,013 
812 
624 
534 
387 
507 
218 
538 
396 
408 



25 

4 

3 
41 
10 
30 
52 
46 
23 
13 

8 
21 
13 
12 

6 
38 
15 
34 



10 
5 



88 



Kinds of Rural Schools, 1908-'09. 



Table XIII. Number of Colored Schools— Cowttwwed. 



Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland -- 
Columbus — 

Craven 

Cumberland ■ 
Currituck -— 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe-. 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson -■ 

Hertford 

Hyde- - 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Colored 

Schools. 



3 

15 
1 
21 
37 
33 
55 
14 
3 
17 
13 
41 
16 
35 
21 
39 
30 
23 



42 
19 
31 
59 
26 

1 
10 
33 
19 
32 

3 
37 
19 
17 
23 
12 



Rural 
Colored 

School 
Popula- 
tion. 



172 

1,637 

68 

1,444 

2,997 

2,610 

4,111 

989 

166 

723 

917 

3,013 

2,204 

4,440 

1,874 

3,170 

2,556 

1,995 

46 

3,502 

1,973 

2,757 

6,638 

2,215 



408 
3,235 
1,431 
2,261 

230 
2,780 
1,317 
1,233 
2,742 

877 



Land 
Area of 

the 
County. 



451 
161 
185 
485 
937 
685 
1,008 
273 
405 
563 
264 
830 
284 
515 
369 
471 
359 
356 
302 
504 
258 
674 
681 
596 
541 
362 
339 
596 
592 
494 
688 
403 



436 
296 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Only 

One 

Teacher. 



3 

10 
1 

17 
36 
31 
52 
13 
3 

15 
12 
36 
14 
35 
17 
36 
28 
22 



41 
16 
27 
55 
25 

1 

8 
25 
17 
31 

2 
31 
16 
14 
23 

9 



Number 
of Rural 
Schools 
Having 
Two or 
More 
Teachers. 



Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 

Some High 

School 

Subjects 

Are 
Taught. 



Kinds of Eueal Schools^ 1908-'09. 



80 



Table XIII. Number of Colored Schooi^s— Continued. 



Macon — 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg - 

Mitchell 

Montgomery - 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 
Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank --. 

Pender 

Perquimans --• 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham--. 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania - 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Colored 

Schools. 



4 

3 

28 

12 

52 

4 

17 
28 
36 
12 
43 
21 
22 
14 
15 
34 
17 
32 
51 
10 
21 
23 
*85 
34 
40 
19 
50 
22 
11 
9 
13 
2 
2 



Rural 
Colored 

School 
Popula- 
tion. 



220 

183 

2,509 

404 

5,480 

169 

1,138 

2,000 

3,363 

941 

4,275 

1,530 

1,723 

1,322 

1,323 

2,579 

1,586 

2,380 

5,152 

399 

1,190 

2,610 

8,332 

3,041 

2,258 

1,635 

3,587 

1,851 

737 

868 

718 

111 

252 



Land 
Area of 

the 
County. 



531 
431 
438 
437 
590 
362 
489 



584 
199 
523 
645 
386 
358 
231 
883 
251 
386 
644 
258 
795 
466 
1,043 
573 
483 
547 
921 
387 
413 
472 
531 
560 
371 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Only 

One 

Teacher. 



4 

3 

24 

10 

52 

4 

16 
26 
33 
11 
41 
15 
21 
10 
15 
32 
13 
32 
48 
10 
20 
18 
*72 
32 
37 
17 
49 
21 
10 
8 
13 
2 
1 



Number 

of Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Two or 

More 

Teachers. 



Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 

Some High 

School 

Subjects 

Are 
Taught. 



1 
5 
*13 
2 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



*18 
3 



*Including Croatan Indian schools. 



90 



KiKDs OF Rural Schools^ 1908-'09. 



Table XIII. Number of Colored ScHOOhS— Continued. 



Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington 
Watauga — 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Total — 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Colored 

Schools. 



9 

41 

21 

61 

38 

18 

2 

38 

17 

26 

8 

2 



2,280 



Rural 
Colored 

School 
Popula- 
tion. 



442 
3.154 
2,404 
5,852 
4,687 
1,234 
77 
2,780 

947 
2,384 

490 

101 



Land 
Area of 

the 
County. 



397 
561 
276 
841 
432 
334 
330 
597 
718 
392 
334 
302 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Only 

One 

Teacher. 



Number 

of Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Two or 

More 

Teachers. 



9 
41 
19 
44 
36 
17 

2 
36 
14 
24 

8 

2 



Number of 

Rural 

Schools in 

Which 

I Some High 

I School 

Subjects 

Are 
Taught. 



2. 
17 
2 
1 



187, 998 



48, 580 



2,088 



192 



93 



F. TEACHERS. 



TABLE XIV. NUMBER AND SEX OF TEACHERS EMPLOYED, 1908-'09. 

This table shows, by races, the number and sex of the public-school teachers, 
rural and city, employed during 190S-'U9. 

SUMMAEY OF TABLE XIV AND COMPARISON WITH 1907-'0S. 



Total number teachers employed, 1908-'09- 
Total number teachers employed, 1907-'08 

Increase 

White teachers. 1908-'09 - 

White teachers, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Colored teachers, 1908-'09 

Colored teachers, 1907-'08 — 

Increase 

White men employed, 1908-'09- 

White men employed, 1907-'08 

Increase 

White women employed, 1908- '09 

White women employed, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Colored men employed, 1908-'09 

Colored men employed, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Colored women employed, 1908-'09 

Colored women employed, 1907-'08 

Increase 



Rural. 



City. 



9,370 

9,052 

318 

6,926 

6,650 

276 

2,444 

2,402 

42 

2,167 

2,105 

62 

4,759 

4,545 

214 

833 

772 

61 

1,611 

1,630 

*19 



1,587 

1.498 

89 

1,203 

1,125 

164 

384 

373 

11 

141 

136 

5 

1,062 

989 

73 

103 

106 

*3 

281 

267 

14 



North 
Carolina. 



10, 957 

10,550 

407 

8,129 

7,775 

337 

2,828 

2,775 

53 

2,308 

2,241 

67 

5,821 

5,534 

287 

936 

878 

58 

1,892 

1.897 

*5 



Alamance 

Rural 

Burlington - 

Graham 

Haw River - 
Mebane 



White. 



G 



21 

18 

1 

1 
1 



a 

i 



97 
62 
17 
10 
5 
3 







Colored. 




Total 

White 

Teachers. 




<u 

1 


Total 

Colored 

Teachers. 


118 


14 


20 


34 


80 


11 


17 


28 


18 


1 


1 


2 


10 


1 


1 ' 


2 


6 








4 


1 


1 


2 



J u 



153 

108 

20 

12 

6 

6 



*Decrease. 



92 



Teachees, 1908-'09. 



Table XIV. Number and Sex of Teachers Employed— Conitnited. 



Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Rural 

Wadesboro-- 

Ashe 

Beaufort 

Rural 

Washington 
Belhaven — 

Bertie 

Rural 

Aulander — 

Windsor 

Bladen 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Rural 

Asheville — 

Burke 

Rural 

Morgan ton -- 

Cabarrus 

Rural 

Concord 

Caldwell 

Rural 

Lenoir 

Granite 

Rhodhiss 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Rural 

Hickory 

Newton '- 



White. 



Colored. 



Men. 


Women. 


Total 

White 

Teachers. 


Men. 


c 

£ 
o 


Total 

Colored 

Teachers. 


Total Whit 
and Colorec 
Teachers. 


51 


16 


67 


6 


2 


8 


75 


38 


13 


51 


3 




3 


54 


16 


45 


61 


14 


32 


46 


107 


14 


38 


52 


13 


29 


42 


94 


2 


T 


9 


' 1 


3 


4 


13 


104 


14 


118 


9 


1 


10 


128 


21 


71 


92 


13 


33 


46 


138 


18 


51 


69 


10 


28 


38 


107 


1 


16 


17 


2 


4 


6 


23 


2 


4 


6 


1 


1 


2 


8 


9 


70 


79 


15 


43 


58 


137 


7 


62 


69 


14 


40 


54 


123 


1 


4 


5 








5 


1 


4 


5 


1 


3 


4 


9 


14 


64 


78 


19 


27 


46 


124 


21 


25 


46 


10 


13 


23 


69 


60 


122 


182 


13 


20 


33 


215 


56 


79 


135 


9 


8 


17 


152 


4 


43 


47 


4 


12 


16 


63 


9 


65 


74 


6 


5 


11 


85 


8 


53 


61 


4 


4 


8 


69 


1 


12 


13 


2 


1 


3 


16 


30 


57 


87 


5 


22 


27 


114 


27 


34 


61 


3 


18 


21 


82 


3 


23 


26 


2 


4 


6 


32 


39 


56 


95 


9 


9 


18 


113 


36 


40 


76 


7 


7 


14 


90 


2 


11 


13 


2 


2 


4 


17 


1 


3 


4 








4 




2 


2 








2 


11 


16 


27 


5 


7 


12 


39 


17 


43 


60 




8 


8 


68 


3 


46 


49 


9 


29 


38 


87 


59 


68 


127 


11 


9 


20 


147 


56 


52 


108 


9 


6 


15 


123 


2 


9 


11 


1 


2 


3 


14 


1 ' 


7 


8 


1 


1 


2 


10 



Teachers, 1908-'09. 



93 



Table XIV. Number and Sex of Teachers Employed— Continued. 



Chatham 

Cherokee 

Rural 

Andrews 

Murphy 

Chowan 

Rural 

Edenton 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Rural 

Shelby 

Kings Mountain - 

Columbus 

Craven 

Rural 

New Bern 

Cumberland 

Rural 

Fayetteville 

Hope Mills 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Rural 

Lexington 

Thomasville 

Davie 

Duplin 

' Durham 

Rural 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Rural 

Tarboro 



White. 



34 

45 

40 

3 

2 

3 

1 

2 

15 

40 

38 

1 

1 

33 

7 

6 

1 

25 

22 

2 

1 

4 

10 
68 
68 



22 

6 

23 

12 

11 

5 

4 

1 



a 

V 

B 
o 



54 

53 

46 

5 

2 

25 

19 

6 

91 
73 
10 

8 
80 
63 
45 
18 
94 
79 
10 

5 
39 
25 
51 
35 
10 

6 
32 
93 
92 
49 
43 
51 
40 
11 



m 

u 
<u 

(s.t: o 



98 

86 

8 

4 

28 

20 

8 

15 

131 

111 

11 

9 

113 

70 

51 

19 

119 

101 

12 

6 

43 

35 

119 

103 

10 

6 

54 

99 

115 

61 

54 

56 

44 

12 



Colored. 



c 



20 
1 
1 



7 

7 

1 

12 
9 
2 
1 

13 

12 

9 

3 

21 

19 

2 

7 

1 

16 

13 

2 

1 

9 

15 

4 

2 

2 

14 

12 

2 



G 

s 

o 



20 
3 
2 
1 

16 

15 

1 

16 
16 



23 
32 
26 

6 

43 
39 

4 

6 

2 

8 

6 

1 

1 

6 

31 

38 

16 

22 

28 

23 

5 



m 
o! o y 

o o a) 
EhOEh 



40 
4 
3 
1 

23 

22 

1 

1 

28 

25 

2 

1 

36 

44 

35 

9 

64 

58 

6 

13 

3 

24 

19 

3 

2 

15 

46 

42 

18 

24 

42 

35 

7 



■ o K 
i " 
5 C ^ 



128 

102 

89 

9 

4 

51 

42 

9 

16 

159 

136 

13 

10 

149 

114 

86 

28 

183 

159 

18 

6 

56 

38 

145 

122 

14 

8 

69 
145 
157 
79 
78 
98 
79 
19 



94 



Teachers, 1908-'09. 



Table XIV. Number and Sex of Teachers Employed— Cowiijiwed. 



Forsyth 

Rural 

, Winston 

Kernersville 

Franklin 

Rural 

Franklinton 

Louisburg 

Youngsville 

Gaston 

Rural 

Gastonia 

Cherryville 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford 

Rural 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Guilford College 

Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck-- 

Weldon 

Enfield 

Roanoke Rapids- 

Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville 



White. 






50 

43 

6 

1 

10 

8 

1 

1 

25 

22 

1 

2 

4 

10 

9 

7 

2 

3 

29 

21 

5 

2 

1 

4 



1 

2 

1 

24 

23 

1 

39 

37 

2 



o 



104 

66 

33 

5 

68 

56 

4 

4 

4 

101 

78 

17 

6 

37 

18 

79 

69 

10 

32 

183 

116 

45 

20 

2 

81 

54 

10 

8 

5 

4 

76 

67 

9 

40 

29 

11 



cs.t: o 



154 

109 

39 

6 

78 

64 

4 

5 

5 

126 

100 

18 

8 

41 

28 

88 

76 

12 

35 

212 

137 

50 

22 

3 

85 

54 

10 

9 

7 

5 

100 

90 

10 

79 

66 

13 



Colored. 






16 

12 

3 

1 

16 

11 

2 

1 

2 

15 

14 

1 



12 

11 

1 

7 
16 
8 
2 
6 

22 

19 

1 

1 

1 

12 
12 



c 

e 

o 



25 
12 
12 
1 
34 
31 



20 

17 

3 

19 

36 
32 

4 
15 
40 
27 



46 

40 

1 

2 

2 

1 

16 

16 



'V a) 



o o a) 
HUH 



41 

24 

15 

2 

50 

42 

2 

4 

2 

35 

31 

4 

24 

48 
43 
5 
22 
56 
35 
10 
11 



59 
2 
3 
3 

1 
28 

28 



— O^ 
O c il 



Teachers, 1908-'09. 



95 



Table XIV. Number and Sex of Teachers Employed— Continued. 



Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville- 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Rural 

Swan Quarter— 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville 

Statesville 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

Smithfield 

Jones 



Lee 



Rural 

Sanford 

Lenoir 

Rural 

Kinston 

LaGrange 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincolnton 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Rural 

Williamston-- 
Robersonville 

McDowell 

Rural 

Marion 



White. 






33 
32 

1 
5 
11 
10 
1 
77 
74 



1 

22 

46 

44 

1 

1 

10 

5 

4 

1 

6 

4 

2 



25 

24 

1 

23 

34 

11 

9 

1 

1 

15 

14 

1 



44 
37 

7 
34 
30 
27 

3 
73 
52 
10 
11 
38 



5 

5 
22 
44 
35 

9 
70 
46 
18 

6 
62 
52 
10 
48 
46 
46 
38 

4 

4 
46 
39 

7 



m 



Colored. 



77 
69 

8 
39 
41 
37 

4 

148 

126 

10 

12 

60 

144 

132 

6 

6 
32 
49 
39 
10 
76 
50 
20 

6 
87 
76 
11 
71 
80 
57 
47 

5 
• 5 
61 
53 






3 

2 

1 

11 



15 

13 

1 

1 

2 

•12 

10 

1 

1 

9 

6 

6 



13 
11 
1 
1 
6 
6 



2 
2 
16 
14 
1 
1 
3 
3 



5 
o 



1 

32 
13 
13 



24 

20 

2 

2 

2 

30 

27 

1 

2 

13 

14 

14 



16 

12 

3 

1 

9 

7 

2 

2 

1 

20 

18 

2 



01 

* o a 

O O D 






12 

10 
2 
43 
21 
21 



39 

33 

3 

3 

4 

42 

37 

2 

3 

22 

20 

20 



29 

23 

4 

2 

15 

13 

2 

4 

3 

36 

32 

3 

1 

10 

10 






O 



o f 
CO) 



89 

79 

10 

82 

62 

58 

4 

188 

159 

13 

15 

64 

186 

169 



54 

69 

59 

10 

106 

73 

24 

8 

102 

89 

13 

75 

B3 

93 

79 

8 

6 

71 

63 



96 



Teachees, 190S-'09. 



Table XIV. Number and Sex of Teachers Employed— Continued. 



Mecklenburg 

Rural 

Charlotte 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Rural 

Troy 

Moore 

Rural 

Southern Pines 

Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount — ■ 

Spring Hope 

New Hanover 

Rural 

Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank —- 

Rural 

Elizabeth City- 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 

P«rson 

Rural 

Roxboro 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville 

Polk 



White. 






27 

22 

5 

43 

22 

21 

1 

32 

30 

2 

16 

13 

2 

1 

3 

1 

2 

12 

15 

14 

14 

7 

3 

4 

11 

2 

2 

4 
2 
2 



13 



a 
o 

S 
o 



159 
88 
71 
41 
47 
44 

3 

53 
51 

2 
99 
70 
24 

5 
64 
16 
48 
58 
50 
47 
29 
41 
21 
20 
40 
33 
27 

6 
56 
48 

8 

130 

118 

12 

23 



0^ 



186 

110 

76 

84 

69 

65 

4 

85 

81 

4 

115 

83 

26 

6 

67 

17 

50 

70 

65 

61 

43 

48 

24 

24 

51 

35 

29 

6 

60 

50 

10 

138 

126 

12 

36 



Colored. 



B 



1 
3 

11 
10 
1 
10 
10 

14 

12 

2 



2 

16 

13 

9 

4 

2 

1 

1 

6 

9 

8 

1 

7 

6 

1 

23 

22 

1 

4 



65 

44 

21 

1 

10 

7 

3 

22 

22 

33 
27 

4 

2 
34 
13 
21 
30 
12 
15 
15 
21 
15 

6 
33 
15 
13 

2 
28 
26 

2 
34 
30 

4 

6 



ni o y 

O O V 

HUH 



74 
52 
22 

4 
21 
17 

4 
32 
32 

47 
39 

6 

2 

36 
13 
23 
46 
25 
24 
19 
23 
16 

7 
39 
24 
21 

3 

35 
32 

3 

57 
52 

5 
10 



^ 



Teachees, 1908-'09. 



97 



Table XIV. Number and Sex op Teachers Employed— Contmued. 



Randolph 

Rural 

Ashboro 

Randleman 

Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham 

Hamlet 

Robeson 

Rural 

Lumberton 

Maxton 

Rockingham 

Rural 

Reidsville 

Ruffin 

Madison 

Rowan 

Rural 

Salisbury 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 

Scotland 

Stanly - 

Rural 

Albemarle 

Stokes 

Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy 

Pilot Mountain 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell — - 

I'art II— 7 





White. 






Colored. 




aJ-B 


Men. 


1 






g 
1 


^2 

Tj 0) 

=« o ii 
o o o 


ts o 2 

^J 'O CO 
c 4» 


sa 


97 


136 


7 


18 


25 


161 


37 


82 


119 


6 


16 


22 


141 


1 


8 


9 


1 


2 


3 


12 


1 


7 


8 


.. .. . 






8 


14 


42 


56 


18 


13 


31 


87 


12 


32 


44 


16 


11 


27 


71 


1 


7 


8 


1 


1 


2 


10 


1 


3 


4 


1 


1 


2 


6 


27 


86 


113 


43 


50 


93 


206 


25 


75 


100 


41 


47 


88 


188 


1 


7 


8 


1 


2 


3 


11 


1 


4 


5 


1 


1 


2 


7 


22 


95 


117 


14 


31 


45 


162 


19 


76 


95 


11 


24 


35 


130 


1 


11 


12 


2 


4 


6 


18 


1 


3 


4 








4 


1 


5 


6 


1 


3 


4 


10 


48 


108 


156 


17 


28 


45 


201 


44 


86 


130 


16 


24 


40 


170 


4 


22 


26 


1 


4 


5 


31 


28 


72 


100 


7 


14 


21 


121 


26 


94 


120 


21 


34 


55 


175 


25 


89 


114 


19 


32 


51 


165 


1 


5 


6 


2 


2 


4 


10 


1 


24 


25 


7 


16 


23 


48 


50 


37 


87 


3 


7 


10 


97 


49 


29 


78 


3 


7 


10 


88 


1 


8 


9 








9 


i 20 


65 


85 


2 


8 


10 


95 


41 


79 


120 


7 


8 


15 


136 


40 


63 


103 


6 


7 


13 


116 


1 


12 
4 


13 
4 


1 


1 


2 


15 
4 


i 21 


29 


50 


1 


1 


2 


62 


13 


27 


40 


1 


2 


3 


43 


' 5 


20 


25 




8 


8 


33 



98 



Teachers, 1908-'09. 



Table XIV. Number and Sex of Teachers Employed— CoMimwed. 



Union 

Rural 

Monroe 

Vance 

Rural 

Henderson 

Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive 

Fremont 

Wilkes 

Rural 

Wilkesboro 

North Wilkesboro - 

Wilson 

Rural 

Wilson City 

Lucama 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

North Carolina 

Rural 

City 



White. 






50 
47 
3 
4 
3 
1 

37 

33 

4 

5 

8 

6 

1 

1 

49 

15 

12 

1 

1 

1 

82 
81 



1 
12 
10 

2 



25 
32 



2,308 

2,167 

141 



5 
o 



m 

B!-tJ O 



Colored. 



78 

67 i 

11 ' 

58 ! 

41 

17 I 
150 
103 

47 : 

45 

28 ' 

20 

3i 

5I 

j 

36 

102 

69 

25 

3 , 

85 
74 

5 

6 
79 
59 



128 

114 

14 

62 

44 

18 

187 

136 

51 

50 

36 

26 

4 

6 

85 

117 

81 

26 

6 

4 

167 

155 

5 

7 

91 

69 



17 


19 


3 


3 


39 


64 


25 


57 


5,821 


8,129 


4,759 


6,926 


1,062 


1,203 



19 

18 

1 

5 

4 

1 

22 

19 

3 

10 

9 

8 



1 
1 
9 
3 
3 
2 
1 
11 
10 



1 

10 
9 
1 



936 
883 
103 



24 

22 

2 

27 

20 

7 

85 

62 

23 

36 

16 

12 

2 

2 

2 

48 

36 

8 

3 

1 

12 
12 



29 
19 
9 
1 
3 
1 






s 


V, 










J3 


h 




^ 


~ 




rt 








-M 


Tl 


C8 





n 


Oi 


H 


Cj 


H 



43 

40 

3 

'32 

24 

8 

107 

81 

26 

46 

25 

20 

2 

3 

3 

57 
39 
11 
5 
2 
23 
22 



1,892 

1,611 

281 



1 
39 

28 

10 

1 

8 

2 

2,828 

2,444 

384 



171 

154 

17 

94 

68 

26 

294 

217 

77 

96 

61 

46 

6 

9 

88 

174 

120 

37 

11 

6 

190 

177 

5 

8 

130 

97 

29 

4 

72 

59 

10,957 

9,370 

1,587 



Teachees, 1908-'09. 



99 



TABLE XV. SCHOLARSHIP OF WHITE TEACHERS, 1908-'09. 

This table shows the grade of scholarship of rural white teachers employed 
during the year, as reported by the county superintendents, also something of 
the training and experience of all white teachers, rural and city, and the num- 
ber of teachers employed in local-tax districts, not including those in city 
schools. 

Summary of Table XV and Compaeison with 1907-'08. 



Total white teachers, 1908-'09 

Total white teachers, 1907-'08 

Increase 

First grade, 1908-'09 

First grade, 1907-'08 — 

Increase 

Second grade, 1908- '09 

Second grade, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Third grade, 1908-'09 

Third grade, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Number having normal training, 1908-'09 

Number having normal training, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Number having four years' experience, 1908-'09 

Number having four years' experience, 1907-'08 

Increase 

Number holding college diploma, 1908-'09 

Number holding college diploma, 1907'-08 

Increase 

Number teachers employed in local-tax districts, 
1908-'09 

Number teachers employed in local-tax districts, 
1907-'08 

Increase 



Rural. 



City. 



6,926 

6,650 

276 

5,355 

4,996 

359 

1,458 

1,551 

93 

113 

103 

10 

1,833 

1,418 

415 

2,977 

3,052 

*75 

927 

821 

106 

1,436 

1,035 
401 



1,203 

1,125 

78 



734 
732 
2 
793 
807 
*14 
682 
685 
*3 



North 
Carolina. 



8,129 
7,775 

354 
5,355 
4,996 

359 

1,458 

1,551 

93 

113 

103 

10 

2,567 

2,150 

417 
3,770 
3,859 

*89 
1,609 
1,506 

103 

1,436 

1,035 
401 



*Decrease. 



100 



Teachees, 1908-'09. 



Table XV. Scholarship of White Teachers — Continued. 



Total 
Number 

of 
Teachers. 



Alamance 

Rural 

Burlington . 

Graham 

Haw River - 

Mebane 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Rural 

Wadesboro - 

Ashe 

Beaufort 

Rural 

Washington 
Belhave^ — 

Bertie 

Rural 

Aulander-— 

Windsor 

Bladen 

Brunswick — 

Buncombe 

Rural 

Asheville -— 

Burke 

Rural 

Morganton - 

Cabarrus 

Rural 

Concord 

Caldwell 

Rural 

Lenoir 

Granite 

Rhodhiss — 



118 
80 
18 
10 



4 
67 
51 
61 
52 

9 

118 

92 

69 

17 

6 

79 
69 

5 

5 
78 
46 
182 
135 
47 
74 
61 
13 
87 
61 
26 
95 
76 
13 

4 

2 



First 
Grade. 



62 
62 



43 
35 
52 
52 



96 
68 
68 



62 
62 



75 

38 

124 

124 



30 
30 



51 
51 



43 
43 



Number 
of 



Number 



Second 
Grade. 



18 
18 



Third 
Grade. 



Teachers Number ' Having Number 
— - - Havmg 

College 
Di- 



Em- Having 1 Four 
ployed Normal ' Years' 



18 
16 



22 
1 
1 



3 

8 
11 
11 



31 
31 



33 
33 



in Rural Training. 
Local -tax! 
Districts. 



10 
10 



23 
23 



6 
14 
14 



10 
10 



13 

4 

36 

36 



13 
13 



40 

24 

5 

8 



3 

3 

25 

22 

18 

4 

44 

29 

20 

7 

2 

31 

25 

1 

5 

36 

11 

113 

79 

34 

6 



6 
47 
29 
18 
58 
44 
11 
2 
1 



Ex- 
perience. 



56 

32 

15 

2 

4 

3 

43 

12 

28 

24 

4 

43 

54 

38 

12 

4 

36 

30 

2 

4 

52 

44 

104 

63 

41 

14 

6 

8 

29 

8 

21 

53 

38 

12 

1 

2 



ploma. 



Tkachers, 1908-'09. 



101 



Table XV. Scholarship of White Teachers — Continued. 



Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Rural 

Hickory 

Newton 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Rural 

Andrews 

Murphy 

Chowan 

Rural 

Edenton 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Rural 

Shelby 

Kings Mountain 

Columbus 

Craven 

Rural 

New Bern 

Cumberland 

Rural 

Fayetteville 

Hope Mills 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Rural 

Lexington 

Thomasville 

Davie 

Duplin 



Total 
Number 

of 
Teachers. 



27 
60 
49 
127 
108 
11 



98 

86 

8 

4 

28 

20 

8 

15 

131 

111 

11 

9 

113 

70 

51 

19 

119 

101 

12 

6 

43 

35 

119 

103 

10 

6 

54 

99 



First 
Grade. 



24 

48 
42 

78 
78 



67 
62 
62 



17 
17 



9 
93 
93 



81 
41 

41 



84 



35 
30 
81 
81 



32 

60 



Second 
Grade. 



3 

5 

7 

25 

25 



20 
21 
21 



6 
16 
16 



32 
10 

10 



17 
17 



8 

5 

17 

17 



22 
39 



Third 
Grade. 



Number 

of 
Teachers 
Em- 
ployed 
in Rural 
Local -tax 
Districts. 



11 

4 

8 

37 

37 



21 
20 
20 



3 
18 
18 



58 
6 
6 



29 
29 



24 

33 

2 

2 



3 
30 



Number 
Having- 
Normal 

Training. 



6 

12 

16 

18 

8 

5 

5 

20 

16 

12 



4 

15 

7 

8 

1 

51 

39 

8 

4 

33 

10 

8 

2 

27 

15 

9 

3 

13 

14 

34 

23 

9 

2 

9 

5 



Number 
Having 
Four 
Years' 
Ex- 
perience. 



13 

28 

23 

70 

56 

7 

7 

46 

77 

66 

7 

4 

19 

12 

7 

■ 5 

62 

52 

9 

1 

36 

40 

29 

11 

35 

22 

8 

5 

16 

27 

61 

51 

9 

1 

24 

9 



Number 
Having 
College 

Di- 
ploma. 



2 

4 

6 

29 

14 

9 

6 

12 

13 

10 

3 

6 

2 

4 

1 

25 

11 

8 

6 

22 

11 

3 

8 

19 

13 

5 

1 

8 

8 

17 

7 

5 

5 

6 

10 



102 



Teachees, 1908-'09. 



Table XV. Scholaeship of White Teachers- — Continued. 



Total 
Number 

of 
Teachers. 



Durham 

Rural 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Rural 

Tarboro 

Forsyth 

Rural 

Winston 

Kernersville 

Franklin 

Rural 

Franklinton 

Louisburg 

Youngsville 

Gaston 

Rural 

Gastonia 

Cherryville 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford 

Rural 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Guilford College 

Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck - 

Weldon 

Enfield 

Roanoke Rapids 



115 

61 

54 

56 

44 

12 

154 

109 

39 

6 

78 

64 

4 

5 

5 

126 

100 

18 

8 

41 

28 

88 

76 

12 

35 

212 

137 

50 

22 

3 

85 

54 

10 

9 

7 

5 



First 
Grade. 



59 
59 



43 
43 



76 
76 



61 
61 



85 

85 



25 
16 
63 
63 



30 
92 
92 



46 
46 



Second 
Grade. 



30 
30 



15 
15 



15 

7 

12 

12 



4 

45 
45 



Third 
Grade. 



Number 

of 
Teachers 
Em- 
ployed 
in Rural 
Local-tax 
Districts. 



29 
29 



13 
13 



26 
26 



11 



25 

25 



69 
69 



Number 
Having 
Normal 
["raining. 


Number 

Having 

Four 

Years' 

Ex- 




perience. 


50 


64 


24 


31 


26 


33 


18 


39 


12 


27 


6 


12 


37 


87 


22 


62 


12 


22 


3 


3 


13 


28 


4 


19 


3 


3 


5 


5 


1 


1 


41 


57 


27 


40 


11 


11 


^ 


6 


20 


25 


4 


9 


37 


41 


28 


35 


9 


6 


7 


10 


67 


105 


28 


53 


33 


36 


5 


15 


1 


1 


34 


46 


19 


26 


5 


6 


6 


6 


1 


5 


3 


3 



Number 
Having 
College 

Di- 
ploma. 



59 

21 

38 

15 

8 

7 

34 

11 

19 

4 

12 

4 

4 

2 

2 

50 

37 

11 

2 

8 

2 

22 

15 

7 

3 

80 

28 

39 

12 

1 

25 

11 

6 

6 



Teachers, 1908-'09. 



103 



Table XV. Scholarship of White Teachers — Continued. 



Total 
Number 

of 
Teachers. 



Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville — 

Hertford 

Hyde — - 

Rural 

Swan Quarter — 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville 

Statesville 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

Smithfield 

Jones 

Lee 

Rural 

Sanford 

Lenoir 

Rural 

Kinston 

LaGrange 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincolnton 

Macon 



100 

90 

10 

79 

66 

13 

77 

69 

8 

39 

41 

37 

4 

148 

126 

10 

12 

60 

144 

132 

6 

6 

32 
49 
39 
10 
76 
50 
20 
6 
87 
76 
11 
71 



First 
Grade. 



62 
62 



Second 
Grade. 



46 
46 



55 
55 



20 
31 
31 



99 
99 



59 
125 
125 



14 
31 
31 



44 
44 



53 
53 



28 
28 



Third 
Grade. 



15 
15 



11 
11 



19 
6 
6 



23 
23 



18 
8 



20 
20 



41 



27 



Number 

of 
Teachers 
Em- 
ployed 
in Rural 
Local -tax 
Districts. 



Number 
Number j Having 
Having | Four 



Normal 
Training. 



24 
24 



2? 
23 



13 
13 



21 
21 



20 
32 
32 



18 
18 



15 



32 
23 

9 
19 

9 
10 
12 
12 



6 

5 

4 

1 

32 

19 

5 

8 

58 

31 

22 

6 

3 

4 

24 

18 

6 

20 

6 

12 

2 

15 

8 

7 

16 



Years' 

Ex- 
perience. 



40 
32 

8 
34 
25 

9 
45 
40 

5 
18 

7 

7 



55 
38 

9 

8 
24 
74 
64 

6 

4 
20 
28 
20 

8 
36 
22 
11 

3 
67 
61 

6 
36 



Number 
Having 
College 

Di- 
ploma. 



15 

8 
7 

14 
8 
6 

10 
6 
4 

15 
7 
6 
1 

27 

11 
5 

11 
1 

12 
& 
Z 
2 
5 

23 

17 
6 

15 

12 
3 

16 

8 
8 



104 



Teachees, 1908-'09. 



Table XV. Scholarship of White Teachers — Continued. 



Total 
Number 

of 
Teachers. 



Madison 

Martin 

Rural 

Williamston 

Robersonville 

McDowell 

Rural 

Marion 

Mecklenburg 

Rural 

Charlotte 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Rural 

Troy 

Moore 

Rural 

Southern Pines-- 

Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount 

Spring Hope 

New Hanover 

Rural 

Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Rural 

Elizabeth City— 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 



80 
57 
47 

5 

5 
61 
53 

8 
186 
110 
76 
84 
69 
65 

4 
85 
81 

4 

115 

83 

26 

6 
67 
17 
50 
70 
65 
61 
43 
48 
24 
24 
51 
35 
29 

6 



First 
Grade. 



48 
39 
39 



38 
38 



92 
92 



46 
49 
49 



70 
70 



65 

65 



17 
17 



45 
60 
53 
36 
24 
24 



50 
23 
23 



Second 
Grade. 



Third 
Grade. 



Number 
of 



Number 



Teachers Number ' Having Number 
Em- Having ' Four slaving 
ployed Normal Years' 



32 



15 
15 



18 
18 



34 
16 
16 



11 
11 



18 
18 



23 
5 

7 
6 



in Rural Training. 
Local-tax 
Districts. 



10 
2 
2 



26 
26 



39 
39 



23 
23 



15 
15 



11 

14 

1 

12 



18 



5 
20 
12 

5 

3 

35 
27 

8 
84 

9 
75 
15 
12 
12 



Ex- 
perience. 



College 

Di- 
ploma. 



30 

15 

12 

3 

33 

7 

26 

32 

5 

19 

6 

11 

5 

6 

9 

9 

6 

3 



36 

35 

27 

5 

3 

33 
28 
5 
93 
53 
40 



2 
35 
33 

2 
72 
56 
13 

3 
49 

9 
40 
20 
27 
37 
20 
25 

8 
17 
20 
15 
12 

3 



1 

10 

7 

1 

2 

15 

9 

6 

86 

42 

44 



5 
1 

4 
20 
18 

2 
23 
15 

7 

1 
31 

5 
26 
20 

n 
O 

9 

4 

15 

5 

10 

12 

11 

9 

2 



Teachers, 1908-'09. 



105 



Table XV. Scholarship op White Teachers — Continued. 



Person 

Rural 

Roxboro 

Pitt -- - 

Rural 

Greenville -- 

Polk 

Randolph 

Rural 

Ashboro 

Randleman - 

Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham 
Hamlet 

Robeson 

Rural 

Lumberton - 
Maxton 

Rockingham-- 

Rural 

Reidsville -- 

Ruffin 

Madison 

Rowan 

Rural 

Salisbury — 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Rural 

Albemarle -- 



Total 
Number 

of 
Teachers. 



First 
Grade. 



60 

50 

10 

138 

126 
12 
36 

1S6 j 
119 

9 - 
8 - 
56 I 

44 ' 



4 

113 

100 

8 

5 

117 

95 

12 

4 

6 

156 

130 

26 

100 

120 

114 

6 

25 

87 

78 

9 



40 
40 



125 

125 



27 
70 
70 



35 
35 



65 
65 



Second 
Grade. 



82 
82 



96 
96 



94 
94 
94 



25 
60 
60 



10 
10 



Number 
of 



Number 



Third 
Grade. 



9 
49 
49 



30 
30 



32 
32 



6 
20 
20 



18 ,- 
18 - 



Teachers Number Having Number 
Em- Having Four «avmg 



ployed Normal , Years 
in Rui-al Training. , Ex- 
Local-taX| perience 

Districts. 



25 
25 



4 
16 
16 



37 
37 



14 
14 



14 
35 
35 



19 

13 

6 

47 

38 

9 

11 

20 

13" 

4 

3 

22 

10 

8 

4 

34 

23 

6 

5 

71 

55 

8 

4 

4 

53 

33 

20 

30 

.25 

22 

3 

9 

18 

12 



24 

17 

7 

81 

71 

10 

18 

58 

46 

8 

4 

22 

15 

6 

1 

49 

37 

7 

5 

49 

32 

12 

2 

3 

77 

61 

16 

44 

52 

47 

5 

11 

41 

39 

2 



College 

Di- 
ploma. 



7 

3 

4 

44 

33 

11 

4 

17 

12 

4 

1 

13 

4 

7 

2 

32 

23 

4 

5 

16 

6 



2 

48 

24 

24 

10 

7 

4 

3 

7 

14 

8 

6 



106 



Teachers, 1908-'09. 



Table XV. Scholarship of White Teachers — Continued. 



Stokes 

Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy 

Pilot Mountain — 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Rural 

Monroe 

Vance 

Rural 

Henderson 

Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive 

Fremont 

Wilkes 

Rural 

Wilkesboro 



Total 
Number 

of 
Teachers. 



North Wilkes- 
boro. 



85 

120 

103 

13 

4 

50 

40 

25 

128 

114 

14 

62 

44 

18 

187 

136 

51 

50 

36 

26 

4 

6 

85 

117 

81 

26 

6 

4 

167 

155 

5 

7 



First 
Grade. 



Second 
Grade. 



57 
65 
65 



23 
35 

20 
110 
110 



40 
40 



108 
108 



48 
22 
22 



21 

72 
72 



100 
100 



22 
37 
37 



17 
5 
5 
4 
4 



26 
26 



64 
9 
9 



54 
54 



Third 
Grade. 



10 



Number 

of 
Teachers 
Em- 
ployed 
in Rural 
Local -tax 
Districts. 



3 

14 
14 



Number 

Having 

Normal 

Training. 



16 

1 

24 

24 



10 
10 



47 
47 



16 
5 
5 



85 
18 
18 



40 
40 



24 

35 

21 

10 

4 

16 

15 

7 

31 

18 

13 

32 

24 

8 

81 

40 

41 

15 

9 

3 

3 

3 

85 

49 

18 

24 

3 

4 

56 

50 

3 

3 



Number 
Having 
Four 
Years' 
Ex- 
perience 



23 

48 

35 

11 

2 

19 

19 

18 

50 

40 

10 

39 

25 

14 

84 

70 

14 

23 

25 

17 

2 

6 

8 

60 

26 

26 

5 

3 

54 

49 

2 

3 



Number 
Having 
College 

Di- 
ploma. 



4 
20 
8 
11 
1 
4 
9 

34 

21 

13 

21 

13 

8 

49 

36 

13 

5 

4 

3 

1 

2 

38 

10 

22 

3 

3 

15 
6 
3 
6 



Teachers, 1908-'09. 



107 



Table XV. Scholarship of White Teachers — Continued. 



Number 

of Number 

Total Teachers ; Number Having 

Number First Second Third Em- Having Four 
of Grade. Grade. Grade. ployed Normal i Years' 
Teachers. in Rural Training. Ex- 

Local-tax perience.] 
i Districts. 



Wilson 

Rural 

Wilson City 

Lucama 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

North Carolina 

Rural 

City 



91 

69 

19 

3 

64 

57 



Number 
Having 
College 

Di- 
ploma. 



8,129 
6,926 
1,203 



61 
61 



32 
34 



5,355 
5,355 



32 

21 



1.458 
1,458 



113 
113 



1,436 
1,436 



29 

13 

13 

3 

8 

17 



2,567 

1,833 

734 



44 
32 
12 



29 

28 



3,770 

2,977 

793 



25 

8 

17 



1,609 
927 
682 



]08 



Teachers, 1908-'09. 



TABLE XVI. SCHOLARSHIP OF COLORED TEACHERS, 1908-'09. 

This table shows the grade of scholarship of rural colored, teachers employed 
during the year, as reported by the county superintendents, also something of 
the training and experience of all colored teachers, rural and city, and the 
number of teachers employed in local-tax districts, not including those in city 
scliools. 

Summary of Table XVI and Compaeison with 1907-'0S. ' 





Rural. 


City. 


North 
Carolina. 


Total number colored teachers employed 1908-'09 

Total number colored teachers employed 1907-'08 

Increase _ _ . 


2,444 

2,402 

42 

757 

736 

21 

1,635 

1,619 

16 

62 

47 

5 

1,104 

952 

152 

1,394 

1,376 

18 

274 

215 

.59 

225 

i 


384 

373 

11 


2,828 

2,775 
53 


First grade 1908-'09 __._-._.... 




First grade 1907-'08 _. .. _. ._. . . 




736 


Increase. . . _. . 




21 


Second grade 1908-'09 . 




1 635 


Second grade 1907-'08--- 


1 619 


Increase.. .-_.___ 


16 


Third grade 1908-'09 . ... ... 




52 


Third grade 1907-'08 _ ... . . 




47 


Increase . . 




5 


Number having normal training 1908-'09 


231 
247 
*16 
293 
293 


1,335 


Number having normal t raining 1907-'08 . 


1,199 


Increase. . .. . . . ... 


136 


Number having four years' experience 1908-'09 .. 

Number having four years' experience 1907-'08 

Increase.. .. . . ... 


1,687 
1,669 

18 


Number having college diploma 1908-'09 . _ . 


155 

158 1 

I 

*3 ' 


429 


Number having college diploma 1907-'08 _ . 


373 


Increase. ..... .... 


56 


Number teachers employed in local-tax districts. . 


225 









♦Decrease. 



Teachees, 1908-"00. 



lOf) 



T.\BLE XVI. Scholarship of Colored Teachers — Continued. 





Total Number of 
Teachers. 


6 
•a 

s 

o 

•4-3 

t S 

4 
4 


6 

O 

d 
o 
o 

02 


■a 
C3 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 

Number Having 
Normal Training. 


Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. 


Number Holding 
College Diploma. 


Alamance . 


34 

28 

2 

2 


24 

24 






19 

18 

1 


25 

19 

2 

2 


i 3 


Rural . 






2 


Burlington 






t 


Graham. .. . 










1 


Haw River. 














Mebane. 


2 

8 

3 

46 

42 

4 

10 

46 

38 

6 

2 

58 
54 










1 


2 
4 
3 

20 

18 

2 

1 

26 

20 

4 

2 

35 

32 


1 


Alexander. _ ... 


1 

9 
9 


6 
3 

33 
33 


1 




1 




Alleghany . .. 




Anson 






7 
7 


4 


Rural . 






3 


Wadesboro. 






1 


Ashe 


1 

28 
28 


9 
10 
10 






1 
33 
29 
3 
1 
51 
49 


1 


Beaufort . 






3 


Rural. . 






1 


Washington 






2 


Belhaven 












Bertie .. 


25 
25 


29 
29 






2 


Rural _ 








Aulander. ... 








Windsor 


4 
46 
23 
33 
17 
16 
11 

8 

3 
27 
21 

6 
18 
14 

4 










2 

27 

5 
24 
10 
14 

2 

! 


* 

3 

32 

20 

26 

14 

12 

5 

2 

3 

17 

12 

5 

12 

10 

2 


2 


Bladen. . 


4 
11 
12 
12 


42 

12 

5 

5 




1 




Brunswick 


4 


Buncombe 




2 


7 


Rural. 


4 


Asheville ... .. 


3' 


Burke. 




8 

8 






1 


Rural .. -. . . 








Morganton 


1 




2i 
22 

1 

18 
4 
10 

7 
3 


1 


Cabarrus. . . .. .. 


5 

5 


16 
16 






10 


Rural ... 


j 




5 


Concord... .. 






5 


Caldwell 


5| 
5 


9 
9 


1 




7 


Rural 






5 


Lenoir ._ 






2 


Granite 










Rhodhiss 


' 













110 



Teachers, 1908--09. 



Table XVI. Scholarship of Colored Teachers — Continued. 





Total Number of 
Teachers. 


o 
S 


■a 

o 

■a 
el 
o 
o 


Third Grade. 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 


•S-a 
eg 

3 O 


Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. 

Number Holding 
College Diploma. 


Camden. . . _ -- 


12 

8 

38 

20 

15 

3 

2 

40 

4 

3 

1 


10 

1 

18 
3 
3 


2 

7 




5 
3 

5 


2 
6 
4 
2 

1 

1 

19 


1 
11 i 1 


Carteret .. _- -- 


3 i 


Caswell -..-_ - 


20 


21 4 


Catawba 


12 
12 




13 5 


Rural 






9 2 


Hickorv 






2 

2 

25 

1 
1 


2 


Newton 










1 


Chatham 

Cherokee 

Rural 

Andrews 


12 


26 
3 
3 


2 


3 
3 


8 


Murohv 
















Chowan 


23 
22 

1 
1 

28 

25 

2 

1 

36 

44 

35 

9 

64 

58 

6 


13 
13 


9 
9 






21 

20 

1 


17 

16 

1 

1 

10 
8 
2 


2 


Rural 






1 


Edenton 








1 


Clay 


1 
4 










Cleveland . 

Rural 

Shelby 

Xings Mountain 


19 
19 


2 
2 




1 
1 


5 
5 


_ _ 












Columbus 

Craven - . 


13 

6 
6 


23 

28 
28 


. 1 

1 


4 
2 
2 


15 
9 
3 
6 

55 

50 

5 


25 

32 

.24 

8 
48 
43 

5 


6 
2 


Rural- _ _ - 


1 


New Bern 


1 


Cumberland 


5 
5 


53 
53 


1 


6 


Rural -- 


j 


4 


Fayetteville. . _ _ _ 


j 


2 












Currituck . . _ _ 


13 
3 

24 

19 
3 
2 

15 


6 

1 
7 
7 


6 

2 

11 

11 


i 

1 8 11 
3 2 


8 
1 
15 
10 
3 
2 
9 


1 


Dare . 


1 


Davidson .__-.- 


1 

1 i 


6 

1 

3 

2 

13 


3 


Rural 


1 


Lexington . _ _ .. 






2 


Thomasville . . . _ . . 












Davie.. 


3 


12 




2 





Teachers, 1908-'09. 



Ill 



Table XVI. Scholarship of Colored Teachers — Continued. 





Total Number of 
Teachers. 


First Grade. 


Second Grade. 


6 

o 

■a 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 


Number Having 
Normal Training. 


Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. 


S 5 
o — 

S ■!. 
11 


Duplin 


46 

42 

18 

24 

42 

35 

7 

41 

24 

15 

2 

50 

42 

2 

4 

2 

35 

31 

4 


1 

1 

1 


45 
17 
17 




6 

7 
7 


22 

13 

9 

24 

20 

4 

21 

11 

8 

2 

26 

21 

2 

2 

1 

24 

20 

4 


6 

32 

14 

18 

26 

21 

5 

33 

■.17 

14 

2 

32 

25 

2 

3 

2 

22 

19 

. 3 


1 


Durham . _ _ . . 


15 


Rural - - - - - - 


3 




12 




12 
12 


23 
23 






5 


Rural 






1 


Tarboro 






4 


Forsvth 


11 
11 


13 
13 






6 


Rural 






3 


Winston 






3 


Kernersville 












Franklin _ _ 


9 
9 


33 
33 




6 
6 


3 


Rural -- .-- ----- 




Franklinton 














2 


Youngsville 










1 


Gaston . _ - 


3 
3 


28 
28 




5 
5 


19 


Rural- - - - - 


18 




1 


Cherrvville 












Gates - - _---__ 


24 


9 


15 




3 


14 


17 




firahaTTi 




Granville - - 


48 
43 
5 
22 
56 
35 
10 
11 


20 
20 


23 
23 




10 
10 


30 
27 

3 
12 
18 
10 

8 


30 

26 

4 

9 

34 

27 

7 


11 


Rural -. - . _ _ 


8 


Oxford 


3 


Greene .. . 


4 
13 
13 


15 

22 
22 


3 


17 
17 


3 


Guilford 


16 


Rural-- ------ 


9 


Greensboro 


7 


High Point 












Guilford College - - - - - 

















112 



Teachers, 1908-'00. 



Table XVI. Scholarship of Colored Teacheks — Continued. 





Total Number of 
Teachers. 


First Grade. 


ci 

c 

a 
o 
o 


Third Grade. 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 


Number Having 
Normal Training. 


Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. 


Number Holding 
College Diploma. 


Hahfax.. ... 


68 

59 

2 

3 

3 

1 

28 

28 


26 
26 


33 
33 






47 
41 


47 
39 
2 
3 
2 
1 

11 
11 


7 


Rural.- - - - _- 






5 


Scotland Neck-- -- - . 








Weldon.- _ --__ 






- 




3 

2 
1 
2 
2 




Enfield - - . 










1 1 


Roanoke Rapids 




i 




1 


Harnett 


3 
3 


25 
25 








Rural - - . 








Dunn-- 








Haywood . _ 


3 










2 


2 




Rural - . . 












Waynesville - 


3 

12 
10 

2 
43 
21 
21 










2 
1 

1 

29 
10 
10 


2 

7 

6 

1 

20 

21 

21 




Henderson - . 


8 

8 


2 
2 




2 
2 




Rural-- - 




Hendersonville 




Hertford. 


20 
14 
14 


23 

7 
7 






3 


Hvde - 




1 
1 




Rural - 




Swan Quarter - - - 




Iredell 


39 

33 

3 

3 

~ 4 

42 

37 

2 

3 

22 

20 

20 


14 

14 


18 
18 


1 

1 


4 
4 


25 
20 
3 
2 
3 
3 
1 
2 


29 

23 

3 

3 

3 

22 

17 

2 

3 

11 

10 

10 


12 


Rural - - - - .. _ 


8 


Mooresville -- - 


1 


Statesville - -- - 








3 


Jackson _ 


3 
15 
15 


1 
22 
22 






2 


Johnston- 




2 
2 




Rural 




Selma 




Smithfield- - . 








Jones -- -_ - _. 


13 
13 


21 
7 
7 


1 


1 
1 


5 
11 
11 




Lee ..... 


11 


Rural ... 


11 


Sanford 




Lenoir.. . .. 


29 
23 

4 
2 


6 
6 


17 
17 








6 
4 
2 


20 

15 

3 

2 


2 


Rural 








Kinston 






2 


LaGrange 













Teachers, 1908-'09. 



113 



Table XVI. Scholarship of Colored Teachers — Continued. 





o 

<I> 

le 

ceo 

« ce 
o t> 


First Grade. 


Second Grade. 


Third Grade. . 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 


Number Having 
Normal Training. 


Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. 


•Si 

CD 0) 


Lincoln 


1 

15 

13 : 

2 

4 

3 

36 
32 

1 
10 

10 


7 

7 


6 
6 






5 
3 
2 


9 

8 

1 


5 


Rural - - ' 






3 








2 


Macon 


12 
12 


4 
3 

20 
20 








Madison 








2 
27 
23 
3 
1 
6 
6 




AT art in 






13 

9 
3 
1 

2 
2 


1 


Rural . 








Williamston 








Robersonville 










1 


McDowell 


2 
2 


8 
8 






1 


Rural 






1 


Marion 








Mecklenburg 


74 
52 
22 

4 
21 
17 

4 
32 
32 


3 
3 


49 
49 






30 

9 

21 


48 

30 

18 

2 

4 


39 


Rural 






18 


Charlotte 






21 


Mitchell _ . 


4 
4 


4 
13 
13 






1 








4 


4 


Rural 








Troy 






4 

7 
7 


4 
21 
21 


4 


Moore. . 


7 

7 


23 
23 


2 
2 


6 
6 


6 


Rural 

Southern Pines 


6 


Nash 

Rural 


47 

39 

6 

2 

36 
13 
23 
46 
25 
24 
19 


5 
5 


34 
34 




7 
7 


3 


4 


2 


Rocky Mount 


3 


4 


2 


Spring Hope 












New Hanover. ... 


13 
13 








28 
13 
15 

9 
10 

9 
15 


28 
12 
16 
25 
13 
17 
11 


15 


Rural 








1 


Wilmington 








14 


Northampton 

Onslow - 


5 

12 

12 

5 


1 

37 
13 
10 
13 


4 

2 
1 


7 
7 

8 


4 

1 


Orange . 


5 


Pamlico . . . . . . .. 


3 



Part II— S 



114 



Teachers, 1908-'09. 



Table XVI. Scholarship of Colored Teachers — Continued. 





o 

<u 

s . 

3 m 
^^ 

ea o 

O <D 


6 

t-i 

O 


Second Grade. 


Third Grade. 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 

Number Having 
Normal Training. 


Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. 


Number Holding 
College Diploma. 


Pasquotank- _ 


23 
16 

7 
39 
24 
21 

3 

35 
32 

3 
57 
52 

5 

10 
25 


13 
13 


3 
3 






23 

16 

7 

19 


17 
11 

6. 
18 
14 
12 

2 
18 
15 

3 
31 
26 

5 

3 

8 

7 

1 




Rural -- ----- 








Elizabeth City - - - - - - 








Pender .- _. - 


19 
13 
13 


19 

7 
7 


1 

1 
1 


8 


12 


Perquimans-- . 


17 


1 


Rural - - - 




14 
3 
7 
5 
2 
14 
10 
4 
2 
9 
8 
1 


1 


Hertford - 




Person ----- _- 




32 
32 






2 


Rural -- 








Roxboro - -_ - 






2 


Pitt - 


13 
13 


39 
.'?9 




4 
4 


4 


Rural -- 




Greenville-- _ ... 




4 


Polk .. 


2 8 
2 19 






2 


Randolph . - 


1 

1 




5 


Rural 

Ashboro 


22 


2 


19 


4 
1 


Randleman ' 












Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham- _ - 


31 

27 

2 


16 
16 


8 
8 


3 
3 


1 
1 


6 
5 

1 


16 

13 

2 

1 

48 

43 

3 

2 

25 

17 

6 


4 
2 
2 


Hamlet.- - 2 












Robeson 1 93 

Rural ! 88 

Lumberton - 3 


40 
40 


44 
44 


4 
4 


3 
3 


63 

58 

3 

2 

36 

28 

6 


13 

12 

1 


Maxton- ._ 2 












Rockingham 45 

Rural 35 

Reidsville. .- 6 


8 
8 


23 
23 


1 

4 I_ 

4 


7 
1 
5 


Ruffin 


! 








Madison 4 










2 
31 
31 


2 

29 
29 


1 


Rowan..- i 45 

Rural 40 

Salisbury ' 5 


13 
13 


26 
26 


1 
1 


5 
5 


14 

14 



Teachers, 1908-'09. 



115 



Table XVI. Scholarship of Colored Teachers — Continued. 





o 

s . 

3 tn 


•a 

o 

m 

s 


■a 

o 

■a 
a 
o 
o 

XII 


•a 
O 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 


II 

3 O 
15 !? 


Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. 


S "^ 


Rutherford 


21 
55 
51 
4 
23 
10 
10 


1 

6 

6 


20 

45 
45 






7 
5 
3 
2 
6 


12 
35 
32 
3 
9 
5 
5 


2 


Samoson - - 




14 

14 


2 


Rural - 


1 


Clinton 


1 


Scotland 


6 
2 
2 


17 
8 
8 




2 




Stanly 




Rural 










Albemarle 






i 




stokes - ---- - 


10 
15 
13 

2 


4 
2 
2 


6 
11 
11 




2 


4 
4 
2 
2 


4 
6 
4 
2 




Surry 


3 


Rural 






1 


Mount Airv 






2 


Pilot Mountain 












Swain 


2 
3 
8 
43 
40 
3 

32 

24 

8 

107 

81 

26 

46 

25 

20 

2 

3 

3 

57 

39 

11 

5 

2 


1 

1 

25 

25 


2 

2 

7 

15 

15 








4 

3 

8 

29 

27 

. 2 

27 

19 

8 

67 
44 
23 
21 
17 
14 




Transylvania _ - 




3 


2 

8 

29 

26 

3 

9 

4 

5 

63 

55 

8 

41 

10 

8 

1 

1 


1 


Tyrrell- . . _- _ _ _ 




Union 






10 


Rural 






7 


Monroe 






3 


Vance _ _ 


2 
2 


19 
19 


3 
3 


4 
4 


4 


Rural . _ 


4 


Henderson . _._. 




Wake. ... ... .. 


1 

1 


70 
70 


10 
10 


18 
18 


16 


Rural . 


12 


Raleigh _ _ ._. 


4 


Warren . 


39 
2 
2 


6 
18 
18 


1 


7 


6 


Washington 




Rural 








Roper 

Plymouth . . 
















3 




Watauga 


6 
6 


3 

33 
33 








Wayne .. .. 




3 
3 


51 

38 

11 

1 

1 


36 

24 

7 

4 

1 


13 


Rural- _ 


3 


Goldsboro ... 


9 


Mount Olive 










1 


Fremont.. ... 













116 



Teachers, 1908-"09. 



Table XVI. Scholarship of Colored Teachers — Continued. 



Wilkes 

Rural 

Wilkesboro 

North Wilkesboro. 

Wilson 

Rural 

Wilson City 

Lucama 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

North Carolina 

Rural 

City 






3 to 
O OJ 





s> 




-a 


03 


c3 


■a 


11 


2 


O 


o 


■o 




a 




o 


IH 


o 




<u 


fe 


!» 



■a 

O 






CO 

(D q 



23 
22 



1 

39 

28 

10 

1 



15 
15 



17 
17 



13 
13 



2,828 
2,444 

384 



757 
757 



cn 



12 
12 



C.5 

3 O 

;z;!z; 



g 



13 
13 



20 

14 

5 

1 



pi '- S 

3oX 



17 
16 



1 

28 
20 
7 
1 
4 
1 



Mm 



XJ so 



16 



1,635 
1,635 



52 
52 



225 
225 



1,335 


1,687 


1,104 


1,394 


231 


293 



429 
274 
155 



FURNITURE OF RURAL SCHOOLHOUSES AND NEW 
HOUSES BUILT. 



TABLE XVII. FURNITURE OF RURAL SCHOOLHOUSES, 1908-'09. 

The following table gives the number of rural schoolhouses furnished with 
patent desks, the number furnished with home-made desks, and the number 
furnished with benches, by races. 

Summary of Table XVII. 





W'hite. 


Colored. 


North 
Carolina. 


Number of rural schoolhouses 


5,1S9 


2,212 
124 
1,335 
772 
5.6 
60.3 
34.9 


7,401 


Furnished with patent desks. -. - 


1,777 


1,901 


Furnished with home-made desks __. ._ 


2,656 
691 
34.2 
51.1 
13.3 


3,991 


Furnished with benches . .. - 


1,463 


Percentage furnished with patent desks 


25 6 


Percentage furnished with home-made desks 


53 9 


Percentage furnished with benches ___ ___ 


19 7 









» 


White. 




Colored. 




Number 
Houses. 


Furnished 
With Patent 
Desks. 


Furnished 
With Home- 
made Desks. 


Furnished 

With 

Benches. 


Number 
Houses. 


Furnished 
With Patent 
Desks. 


Furnished 
With Home- 
made Desks. 


Furnished 

With 

Benches. 


Alamance 


54 
49 
41 
43 
99 
76 
62 
70 
49 
89 
51 
43 
69 
19 
40 
40 
75 


44 
4 
9 

22 
8 
9 


10 
35 
15 
11 
60 
62 
50 
50 
40 
42 
40 
44 
60 
13 
17 
9 
71 




26 

5 

3 

40 

10 

33 

55 

46 

25 

13 

8 

22 
14 
12 
8 
38 
16 


5 


14 


7 


Alexander 


14 

17 

10 

31 

5 

12 

4 

4 

2 

13 


4 


Alleghany 

Anson 






3 






40 


Ashe . 


3 


1 

17 

30 

23 

17 

3 

4 

10 

14 

12 

3 

8 

18 


9 


Beaufort 

Bertie. . . 


15 
25 


Bladen 


16 
52 




23 


Brunswick 

Buncombe .. 

Burke.. . .. ... 


1 


7 
9 
4 


Cabarrus 


4 
9 
6 
18 
26 
6 




9 


Caldwell . 






1 


Camden.. . . 




1 




Carteret. . . 


5 
5 


5 


Caswell. .. 


30 


Catawba 







118 



Furniture of HouseS;, 1908-'09. 



Table XVII. Fukniture of Rural Schoolhouses — Continued. 





White. 


Colored. 




3 O 


Furnished 
With Patent 
Desks. 


Furnished 
With Home- 
made Desks. 


Furnished 

With 

Benches. 


0) to 
3 O 

:z;W 


Furnished 
With Patent 
Desks. 


Furnished 
With Home- 
made Desks. 


Furnished 

With 

Benches. 


Chatham . . . - . . 


72 
57 
19 
16 
73 
87 
47 
72 
33 
19 
87 
34 
72 
26 
39 
80 
42 
61 
31 
22 
49 
28- 
82 
42 
58 
50 
46 
32 
24 
88 
44 
107 
27 
28 
39 


12 
3 
18 
1 
23 
33 
24 
39 
12 


58 

43 

1 


2 
5 


37 

2 

15 




27 
1 
9 


10 


Cherokee 






Chowan 


1 


5 


Clay 


15 
4 

30 
3 


1 


Cleveland. 


46 
27 
20 
33 
21 
14 
70 
40 
65 


21 
36 
32 
53 
14 

3 
16 
11 
40 
16 
35 
21 
36 
29 
23 

1 
41 
19 
29 
48 
27 

1 

8 
33 
18 
30 

3 
36 
17 
12 
23 




5 

15 
18 
28 
11 


16 


Columbus - 




23 


Craven 

Cumberland 


3 


12 
25 


Currituck 




1 


2 


Dare 


3 
9 


3 


Davidson 


13 
3 

7 
26 
27 
67 
20 
30 

9 

1 
32 
18 
58 
33 
11 
19 
11 
14 

1 

39 
10 
38 

7 




3 
13 
40 
10 
30 
14 
30 

8 
20 

1 
41 
17 
17 
23 
21 


14 


Davie - . 






Duplin 




1 
6 
5 
6 




Durham. . 






Edgecombe. . 


12 
13 
20 
28 
22 

2 
20 

13 

24 

17 

45 

20 

24 

21 

17 

46 

3 

68 

20 

3 

4 






Forsyth 




1 


Franklin ._ 


2 
3 


6 


Gaston . 


1 

2 


20 


Gates 




Graham 


19 




Granville 







Greene.. 






2 


Guilford 




9 
21 


3 


Halifax 


1 

2 

11 

10 

3 

6 

2 

31 

3 

2 


6 


Harnett 


6 


Haywood . 







Henderson. . . 






9 


Hertford 

Hyde 


2 


22 
'4 
19 


17 
15 


Iredell 

Jackson.. 


1 


10 
3 


Johnston 

Jones 


1 


28 

17 

2 

11 


7 
5 


Lee .. . 






Lenoir 


36 




12 





FuENiTUKE OF Houses^ 1908-'09. 



119 



Table XVII. Furniture of Rural Schoolhouses — Continued. 



Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecldenburg 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover.. 
Northampton.. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. _ 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania. _ 
Tyrrell 



White. 



3 O 

;2;S 



57 

59 

68 

43 

56 

69 

62 

58 

60 

50 

14 

41 

52 

39 

22 

21 

39 

26 

45 

80 

28 

94 

27 

79 

73 

82 

75 

90 

23 

57 

65 

88 

43 

28 

25 



a 

■^^ ■ 
.la CO 



9 

5 

8 

4 
11 
34 

2 

40 
41 

7 
17 

5 
11 
12 

4 
12 

44 ! 
15 

2 
15 
22 
42 
67 
38 
42 
22 

8 

6 

26 
29 

2 



m O aj 

■SWQ 



44 
28 
19 
39 
24 
35 
26 

10 

9 

8 

23 

47 

23 

7 

7 

27 

20 

1 

65 

13 

76 

5 

25 
6 

34 
22 
60 
15 
43 
34 
18 
34 
4 
22 



■a 



5 

26 
41 



Colored. 



16 



10 



5 
3 
10 
3 
6 



14 
3 

12 

10 
14 

8 

12 
5 

41 

7 

16 



a; m 

E 3 
3 O 



12 
4 

3 
28 

9 
56 

3 
17 
22 
35 
11 
43 
20 
25 
13 
16 
33 
18 
32 
51 

7 
16 
20 
79 
42 
32 
23 
50 
22 

6 
10 
13 

2 

1 

9 



3x;.ii) 

3^ 0) 



3 

14 
4 

1 
3 



O! o aj 

co>-^" 

'—I 



28 
5 

22 
1 

10 

35 

12 

42 

21 

6 

7 

15 

19 

10 

32 

50 

1 

9 

46 

20 

20 

8 

35 
19 



73 

.2 .3 

tH *^ 3 
3'^ a> 



13 
3 
3 

5 
34 



11 



19 
6 

13 

8 



8 

7 

22 

40 



15 
14 

6 
10 
12 
2 
1 
9 



120 



FUEFITURE OF HoUSES^ 1908-'09. 



Table XVII. Furniture of Rural Schoolhouses — Continued. 





White. 


Colored. 




o a; 
3 O 


Furnished 
With Patent 
Desks. 


Furnished 
With Home- 
made Desks. 


Furnished 

With 

Benches. 


X3 a> 

E 3 
3 O 


Furnished 
With Patent 
Desks. 


Furnished 
With Home- 
made Desks. 


Furnished 

With 

Benches. 


Union _ 


83 
23 
88 
34 
25 
68 
65 
124 
51 
52 
36 


10 
22 
83 
20 

1 

1 
52 

4 
34 

6 


52 

1 

5 

10 

22 

10 

13 

101 

13 

45 

2 


20 


36 
21 
62 
42 
17 
2 

38 

17 

26 

6 

2 




9 
21 
50 
22 
14 


29 


Vance _ _ 






Wake.-_ .- -. . 




10 


7 


Warren _ - _ 


4 

2 

57 


20 


Washington. . 




3 


Watauga 




2 


Wayne - - . 


3 


35 

6 

23 

1 




Wilkes -- 


19 


11 


Wilson . _ _ . _ 




4 


Yadkin . . 


1 
33 




5 


Yancey 




2 










Total 


5,189 


1,777 


2,656 


691 


2,212 


124 


1,335 


772 



New Houses, 1908-'09. 



121 



TABLE XVIII. NEW RURAL SCHOOLHOUSES BU I LT AND TH EIR COST, 
AND THE AMOUNT EXPENDED FOR REPAIRS, 1908-'09. 

This table shows the number of new rural schoolhouses built during the 
year, by races, and their cost, and also the cost of repairs on old houses. 

Summary of Table XVIII and Comparison with 1907-'0S. 



North 
Carolina. 



Total new schoolhouses built 1908-'09 
Total new schoolhouses built 1907-' 

Total for two years 

Total cost of new schoolhouses built 1908-'09 
Total cost of new schoolhouses built 1907-'08 

Decrease 

Average cost of new rural schoolhouses built 1908-'09 
Average cost of new rural schoolhouses built 1907-' 

Increase 

Total cost of repairs 






Number 

New 
Houses, 
White. 


Number 

New 
Houses, 
Colored. 


Total 
Number 

New 
Houses 

Built. 


Total Cost 

New 

Houses. 


Total Cost 

of Repairs, 

Old 

Houses. 


Alamance. . ._ 


3 
2 
3 

2 




3 
3 
3 
5 


$ 3,366.00 
1,300.00 
1,600.00 
4,800.00 


$ 440 30 


Alexander 

Alleghany .. .--. 


1 


166.00 


Anson ._ 

Ashe.. - . _ _ - 


3 


200.00 
606 . 52 


Beaufort- .. _ . _ 


2 
3 
9 
2 

6 

1 
3 
8 

1 
5 


1 3 


800.00 
3,300,00 
4,700.00 
1,225.00 
6,848.00 

350.00 
1,961.00 
2,707.00 
2,000.00 
1,200.00 

270.00 
1,950.00 
1,957.00 
1,200.00 


301 43 


Bertie- - - 


1 

3 

1 
1 


4 

12 

3 

7 
1 
5 
9 
1 
5 
2 
2 
4 
1 




Bladen 


150 00 


Brunswick. ... .... 


125 00 


Buncombe- - 


363 02 


Burke . .. 


125 00 


Cabarrus 

Caldwell 


2 
1 


97.26 
190 00 


Camden . ... 




Carteret. _ . 






Caswell.. . _ 




2 


128 10 


Catawba. -. . . 


2 
3 
1 




450 00 


Chatham . 


1 


266 26 


Cherokee l 


42.60 



122 



:N'ew Houses, 1908-'09. 



Table XVIII. New Rural Schoolhouses Bi]iL,T—Conlinued. 



Chowan 

Clay_: 

Cleveland.-- 
Columbus.. 

Craven 

Cumberland . 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe - 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood. -_ 
Henderson. . 
Hertford... 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones 



Number 

New 
Houses, 
White. 



Number 

New 
Houses, 
Colored. 



Total 
Number 

New 
Houses 

Built. 



Total Cost 

New 

Houses 



1 

1 
10 

5 
10 

1 



B 215.00 

300.00 

600.00 

10,200.00 

1,346.00 

5,000.00 

210.00 



466.00 
896.00 
550.00 
9,500.00 
5,440.00 
6,788.00 
2,090.00 
2,500.00 



Total Cost 

of Repairs, 

Old 

Houses. 



167.00 

14.00 

2,100.00 

1,500.00 

578.27 

800.00 

171.43 

179.07 

141.81 



1,000.00 
306.00 

1,600.43 
65.00 
18.95 



Lee. 



Lenoir.. 
Lincoln . 
Macon. . 
Madison. 
Martin.. 



4 
2 1 
3 

I 

6 
3 
8 
2 
1 
2 
4 
2 
4 
3 



I 12,877.00 
829.00 

6,100.00 
250.00 

2.632.00 



2,647.00 
1,950.00 
3,750.00 
4,180.00 
3,500.00 
3,507.00 
900.00 
250.00 
1,000.00 
1,143.00 
1,079.00 
2,400.00 
3, 000 .'00 



30.00 
145.00 

85.00 
500.00 
888.80 
622.49 
1,050.23 
566.46 
472.44 
180.36 
229.00 
123.00 
664.96 



18.61 

71.05 

195.92 

513.82 



:N'ew Houses, 1908-'09. 



12:] 



Table XVIII. New Rural Schoolhouses Built — Continued. 



McDowell 

Mecklenburg. - 

Mitchell 

Montgomery.- 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover- 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank... 

Pender 

Perquimans... 
Person 



Pitt. 



Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham _ 

Rowan 

Rutherford _ _ 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania. 

TyrreU 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

AVarren 

Washington. - 
Watauga 



Number Number I MT^^hL. 

New New , ^^"\^'^'^ 

Houses, Houses, tjI.JLc 

White. I Colored. ^^^[^^ 



11 

4 
1 
4 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
2 



Total Cost 

New 

Houses 



% 4,000.00 

11,694.00 

1,67.5.00 

181.00 

16,075.00 

4,842.00 

828.00 

1,000.00 

1,404.00 

930.00 

1,408.00 



5 
2 
7 
1 
7 
5 
5 
4 
10 
3 
5 
4 
3 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 
4 



2,000.00 
850.00 



4,250.00 

557.00 

13,933.00 

1,613.00 

5,000.00 

5,160.00 

4,766.00 

1,137.00 

6,074.00 

1,089.00 

1,359.00 

1,175.00 

1,800.00 

441.00 

1,910.00 

705.00 

348.00 

1,700.00 

14,492.00 



Total Cost 

of Repairs, 

Old 

Houses. 



$ 2,000.00 
593.17 



19.30 

2,119.82 

66.73 

1,300.00 

208.88 

627.00 

35.69 



200.00 
259.02 
107.54 



17.24 



400.00 

1,375.00 

359.00 

403.23 

49.00 

259.26 

200.00 

258.26 

62.15 



226.97 
197.29 
911.00 
120.00 
687.00 

115.44 



124 



:^rEw Houses, 1908-'09. 



Table XVIII. New Rural Schoolhouses Built — Continued. 



Number Number 

New New 

Houses, Houses, 

White. Colored. 



Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Total 



284 



Total 
Number 

New 
Houses 

Built. 



72 



356 



Tot^al Cost oTTepaifs! 
Houses, i Ho'Ss^es. 



8 3,436.00 ; $ 734.28 
3,140.00 j 900.00 

8,216.00 ' 498.90 

1,940.00 

1,019.00 • 77.51 



272,376.00 34,039.27 



First $100,000. 



125 



RECORD OF DISTRIBUTION OF FIRST $100,000 FOR 1908-'09. 



Counties. 



Population. Amount 



Alamance. 
Alexander- 
Alleghany. 
Anson 



Ashe 

Beaufort . 
Bertie 



Bladen 

Brunswick. 
Buncombe. 
Burke 



Cabarrus. 
Caldwell - 



Camden. 
Carteret. 
Caswell. 



Catawba - 
Chatham. 
Cherokee- 
Chowan. . 



Clay. 



Cleveland . 
Columbus - 
Craven 



Cumberland . 
Currituck 



Dare- 



Davidson. 
Davie 



Duplin.. 
Durham. 



Edgecombe. 
Forsyth 



Franklin. 
Gaston... 



Gates 

Graham.. 
Granville- 
Greene 



9,188 
4,032 
3,077 
8,310 
7,759 
8,886 
7,633 
6,346 
4,170 

16,259 
6,480 
8,585 
6,633 
2,023 
4,075 
4,824 
9,814 
8,587 
5,194 
3,344 
1,465 
9,331 
8,786 
7,638 

11,962 
2,622 
1,708 
9,238 
4,614 
8,050 

10,962 
8,716 

13,525 
8,425 

13,277 

4,043 
1,630 
8,228 

4,187 



1,282.75 

564.35 

430.92 

1,161.07 

1,084.08 

1,241.55 

1,066.48 

880.66 

583.63 

2,271.70 

905.38 

1,199.49 

926.76 

283.65 

569.36 

674.00 

1,371.21 

1,199.77 

725.70 

468.22 

206.24 

1,303.71 

1,227.58 

1,067.18 

1,671.33 

367.34 

239.64 

1,290.73 

644.66 

1,124.74 

1,533.00 

1,217.80 

1,889.71 

1,177.14 

1,855.06 

565.89 

228.74 

1,149.61 

585.00 



126 



First $100,000. 



Record of Distribution — Continued. 



Guilford. 
Halifax . 



Harnett 

Haywood. . 
Henderson. 
Hertford . . 



Hyde. 



Iredell. 



Jackson. 



Johnston. 
Jones 



Lenoir. 



Lincoln. 
Macon . . 



Madison. 



Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg. 
Mitchell 



Montgomery. 
Moore 



Nash 

New Hanover. 
Northampton- 



Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank. 

Pender 

Perquimans - 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. 

Rowan 

Rutherford. - 



Counties. 



Population, i Amount. 



17,955 


$ 2,508.67 


11,557 


1,614.74 


7,535 


1,052 79 


6,665 


931.23 


5,269 


736.18 


5,143 


718.57 


3,152 


' 441.39 


11,098 


1,550.61 


4,294 


599.95 


12,697 


1,756.02 


2,793 


391.23 


6,466 


903.43 


6,266 


875.48 


4,506 


629.57 


7,762 


1,084.50 


5,808 


811.49 


5,276 


737.16 


21,244 


2,968.21 


6,463 


903.01 


5,063 


707.40 


9,054 


1,265.02 


9,665 


1,350.39 


7,588 


1,060.19 


6,750 


943.11 


4,654 


650.25 


4,766 


665.90 


3,379 


473.11 


4,998 


698.32 


5,0S4 


710.33 


3,530 


494.21 


5,705 


797.10 


11,906 


1,663.50 


2,313 


324.17 


10,034 


1,401.95 


6,265 


875.34 


16,742 


2,339.19 


12,412 


1,734.20 


12,071 


1,686.56 


9,469 


1,323.00 



First $100,000. 



127 



Record of Distribution— Con^i/med. 



Counties. 



Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington - 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Total. 



Population. Amount. 



10,340 


$ 1,444.70 


3,262 


455 . 76 


7,084 


980.77 


6,810 


951.49 


10,411 


1,454.62 


3,370 


471.85 


2,331 


326.68 


1,731 


242.85 


9,424 


1,316.72 


7,051 


985.16 


20,193 


2,821.36 


7,207 


1,007.10 


3,613 


505.80 


4,941 


690.35 


11,311 


1,580.37 


11,027 


1,540.69 


9,156 


1,279.27 


5,282 


738.00 


4,138 


578.16 


715,716 


100,000.00 



128 



Second $100,000. 



ANNUAL APPROPRIATION TO EQUALIZE SCHOOL TERMS, 1908-'09. 

The following is the record of the apportioumeut of the annual State appro- 
priation of $100,000 to equalize school terms in accordance with section 4099, 
Kevisal 1905. 



Counties. 


Number Districts 
Asking Aid. 


Amount 
of Aid 
Legally 
Asked. 


Amount 
Appor- 




White. 


Colored. 


tioned. 


Alexander 

Alleghany _. -..._ 


52 
41 
99 
70 
44 
20 
42 
41 


6 

3 

10 

48 

16 

4 

6 

38 


$ 3,995.10 
3,323.05 
3,945.52 
5,593.92 
2,847.31 
1,132.74 
3,275.00 
2,414.20 
1,665.83 
2,351.56 
4,521.81 
1,191.14 
2,041.06 
4,400.00 
2.116.46 
3,765.50 

830.00 
2,325.00 

545.15 
1,645.05 
1.281.61 

820.00 

672.42 
1,155.66 
2.966.95 
3.205.26 
2,711.00 
3,944.08 
1.255.84 
1,932.43 
3,635.18 
1,983.98 
2.899.20 


$ 2,643.86 
2.316 42 


Ashe. . . - - . 


2,643.08 


Bladen. . . . ..... 


3,182.61 


Brunswick.. . _ . . 


2,139.42 


Caldwell . . _ . 


941. 56 


Carteret . ... ... .. 


2,232.85 


Caswell ._ . ... 


1.899.36 


Catawba... __ ... .. ... 


77 16 


1,042.56 


Chatham. 


70 
50 
31 
74 
76 
32 
19 
19 
56 
10 
29 
25 
20 
26 
60 
51 
27 
69 
38 
28 
35 
58 
59 
61 


16 
3 
9 

28 

54 

12 
3 
6 

15 
3 

23 

23 
1 
3 

31 
9 
9 

27 
3 

20 
5 

12 
4 
4 


1,674 87 


Cherokee. ..... . 


2,784.92 


Cleveland . .. ....... 


831.58 


Columbus . . . 


1,614.57 


Cumberland. . 


2,531.01 


Currituck 


1.669.71 


Dare.- _. 


2,488.03 


Davidson .... . . 


697.95 


Davie ._ . . 


1,673.46 


Duphn . .. _ .. .. 


526.88 


Franklin . 


1,358.83 


Gates 


961.89 


Graham. ...... 


749,93 


Greene .. . ... 


576.30 


Harnett . . 


779 16 


Henderson 


2,355.69 


Hyde 


2,082.91 


Iredell. __.... .. _. 


1,793.90 


Jackson . .. .. ... 


2.495.94 


Jones. . . 


1,118.95 


Lee . . 


1,534.53 


Lincoln 


2,038.29 


Macon. .. 


1,204.18 


Madison.- 


2.299.22 



Second $100,000. 



129 



Appropriation to Equalize School Terms — Continued. 



Counties. 



Number Districts 
Asliing Aid. 



Amount ' 
of Aid ! 

Legally 
Aslsed. 



Amount 
Appor- 
tioned. 




McDowell 

Mitchell 

Montgomery - 

Moore 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pender 

Person 

Randolph 

Rockingham - 
Rutherford . . 

Sampson 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Transylvania- 
Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Total.. 



92,500.00 



Part II—!) 



A. RECEIPTS FOR SCHOOLS. 



TABLE I. SCHOOL FUNDS AND SOURCES, 1909-'10. 

This table shows the total school fuud of each county and of each separate 
town or city school system for the scholastic year 1909-'10 and the sources of 
the same. 

Summary of Table I and Compaeison with 190S-'09. 



Rural. 



Balance from 1908-'09. 

Local tax, 1909-'10 

Local tax , 1908-' 09. 

Increase . 

Percentage of increase 

Loans, bonds, etc., 1909-'10 

Loans, bonds, etc., 1908-'09 . 

Increase 

County fund, 1909-'10 

County fund, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Special State appropriations, elementary schools. .. 

Special State appropriations, public high schools 

Private donations. State appropriations, etc., for libra- j 
ries, 1909-' 10 i 

Private donations, State appropriations, etc., for libra- 1 
ries, 1908-' 09 ! 

Increase -. 

Total available school fund, 1909-10 

Total available school fund, 1908-09 

Increase , 

Percentage of increase 

Rural funds (not included in above), 1909-'10t 

Rural funds (not included in above), 1908-'09 

Increase 



$ 277,635.54 

296,914.63 

237.744.17 

59,170.46 

24.9 

66,775.00 

59,302.50 

7,472.50 

1,446,355.84 

1,477,933.72 

*31,577.88 

216,220.80 

48,350.00 

25,410.66 

30,462.41 

*5,011.75 

2,377,662.47 

2,325,863.12 

51,799.35 

2.2 

65,971.32 

76,128.14 

*10,156.82 



City. 



$ 56,918.40 

580,885.28 

579,505.65 

1,379.63 

.24 

227,302.49 

160,768.46 

66,534.03 

307,806.42 

284,845.62 

22,960.80 



14.85 

*14.85 

1,172,912.59 

1,093,239.91 

79,672.68 

7.3 



North 
Carolina. 



i 334,553.94 

877,799.91 

817,249.82 

60,550.09 

7.4 

294,077.49 

220,070.96 

74,006.53 

1,754,162.26 

1,762,779.34 

*8.617.08 

216,220.80 

48,350.00 

25,410.66 

30,477.26 

*5,066.60 

3,550,575.06 

3,419,103.03 

131,472.03 

3.7 

65.971.32 

76,128.14 

♦10,156.82 



♦Decrease. fSee Supplement to Table I. 




y. 



o 
o 

o 






•f. 



School Fund, 1909-'10. 



131 



T.\BLE I. School Fund and Sources — Continued. 



Balance 
1908-'09. 1 


County 

Funds, 

18c. Tax, 

etc. 


Local State 
Taxes, First 
etc. SIOO.OOO. 


State 
Second 
$100,000. 


State 

for 

Public 

High 

Schools. 


Bonds, 
Loan i 
Fund, 
Bor- 
rowed 
Money, 
etc. 


Li- 
braries, 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. 


Total 
Fund. 


la.inance 


1 910.75 

t 

299.47 

103.46 

n.33 

496.49 

3,215.17 

31.46 

3,064.42 

3,056.16 

8.26 

810.79 

6,641.44 

5,983.06 

364.84 

293.54 

7,267.25 

6,707.25 

280.00 

280.00 

613.16 

2,375.83 

2,918.21 

1,579.70 

1,338.51 

3,071.85 

3,071.85 

2,461.96 

1,972.49 

489.47 

851. 6J 

*149.5f 

373. 2[ 

93.97 

384.4; 


1 1 
$ 29,980.45113,086.68$ 1,623.33 

23,003.55 313.29 1.623.33 


I 


S 750.00 8 4,150.00 

750. OOi 2,400.00 

1 1,500.00 


$1,015.72 
1,015.72 


S 51,516.93 


Rural 




29,105.89 


Burlington 


3,467.20 


6,461.89 




11,728.56 


Graham _ _ 


1,685.00 


3,521.05 




5,309.51 


Haw River 


1,030.75 
793.95, 

7,373.60 

4,755.42 
17,452.68 
15,573.68 

1,879.00 
10,331.91 
25,866.94 


1,. 597. 72' ' 

1,192.73 




250.00 




2,889.80 


Mebane - 




2,483.17 


Llexander 


1,971.75 694,86 1.726 40 


500.00 
250.00 
750.00 
750.00 




30.00 
310.00 
270.00 
270.00 


15,511.78 


lUeghany - _ . . 


1 

534.94 
6,869.72 1,476.78 
2,443.33; 1,476.78 
4,426.39 


2,741.18 
1,380.79 
1,380.79 




8,623.00 


LHSon 

Rural --- 

Wadesboro 


1,105.00 

830.00 

275.00 

1,000.00 

5,400.00 


32,369.39 

25,780.74 

6,588.65 


Lshe 

Jeaufort - 


601.83 1,279.84 
15.529.06 1.632 59 


2,777.64 


500.00 
350.00 
350.00 


80.00 
861.32 
861.32 


. 17,382.01 
56,281.35 




20,672.94 2.640.00 1.632.59 




32,139.91 


Washington 


3,480.00 


10,609.86 




5,400.00 


19,854.70 


Belhaven 


1,714.00 

16,700.46 

15,450.46 

425.00 

825.00 

12,514.40 

9,255.66 

65,701.03 

i 

47,090.46 
18,610.57 
12,534.41 
10,838.78 

1,695.63 
26,612.37 
21,420.37 

5,192.00 
17,589.35 
14,502.49 

2,011.15 
579.42 


2,279.20 








4,286.74 


Jertie 


6,819.11 1,320.81 
2,245.11 1,320.81 
1,750.00 




500.00 
500.00 




70.00 
70.00 


32,677.63 


Rural 






26,293.63 


Aulander. . - _ 






2,455.00 


Windsor.. . 


2,824.00 











3,929.00 


Jladen 

Srunswick 

Buncombe 


3,267.26 991.55 

811.90 808.50 

47,486.97,.. 


3,374.97 
1,350.00 


500.00 

750.00 
750.00 


600.00 
2,400.00 
12,000.00 
3,000.00 
9,000.00 
1,500.00 


120.00 
40.00 

272.84 
272.84 


21,981.34 

17,041.89 

129,129.05 


Rural 

Asheville. . . . . 


11,269.46 

36,217.51 




63,962.46 
65,166.59 


Burke . . - 


6,960.26 905.38 
t905.38 


897.14 
897.14 




90.00 
90.00 


25,959.04 


Rural - 




15,803.15 


Morgauton . 


6,960.26 




1,500.00 

5,548.76 

250.00 

1 

1 5,298.76 
! 2,600.00 

' 500.00 

1 

2,100.00 


10,155.89 


"abarrus 

Rural 

Concord .. _ ._ 


11,614.68 1,471.64 
2,327.13 1,471.04 
9,287.55 




2.50.00 
250.00 


355.00 
3.55.00 


48,314.41 
28,046.63 
20,267.78 


Caldwell 

Rural 


7,900.93 1,186.77 
1,186.77 


2,487.49 

' 2,487.49 


500.00 
500.00 


55.00 
55.00 


33,171.19 
19,231.75 


Lenoir 


7,082.11 


11,566.49 


Tiranite 


.506.82 








1,180.21 




) 496.29 


312.00 






'.. 




1,192.74 



♦Deficit. J A balance was reported, but later was found to be an error. tLast year's appropriation. 



132 



School Fund, 1909--10. 



.Table I. School Foxd axd Sources — Continued. 



County 

Balance Funds. toit^c 

1908-09. 18c. Tax, ^'*^^® 

etc. 



Ix)cal State 
First 
etc. i $100,000. 



State 
Second 
$100,000. 



State 

for 

Public 

High 



Bonds, 
Loan 
Fund, 
Bor- 
rowed 



Schools Money, 
etc. 



Li- 
braries, 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. 



Camden. ..$ *655.39$ 3,384.97$ 1,702. 

Carteret 3.006.06 8,708.51 2.266. 

Caswell 1,114.99 8,734.82 

Catawba 1.514.71 27,885.55 10.352. 

Rural j 269.43 22,207.38 3.6S0 

Hickory 140.58 3,354.83 4.315. 

Newton.- 1,104.70 2,323.34 2,357. 

Chatham *165.77 15,659.81 3,108. 

Cherokee 331.73 12,165.84 10,127. 

Rural ' 10,165.84 2,839. 

Andrews 25.00 2,000.00 4,813. 

Murphy 306.73.. 2,475. 

Chowan 4,612.99 8,811.70 4,779. 

Rural 4.059.41 7.531.70 217. 

Edenton 553.58 1,280.00 4,561. 

Clay 2,514.19 384. 

Cleveland- 240 00 27,306.15 9,938. 

Rural... 15.00 24,121.15 2,880. 

Shelby.. 225.00 2,060.00 3.000 

Ivings Momitain.-- 1,125.00 4,058. 

Columbus 1,344.22 24,235.24 13,921. 

Craven 4,679.93 29,091.74 11,006. 

Rural 2,802.87 23,558.00 1,262. 

New Bern 1,877.06 5,533.74 9,744. 

Cumberland 1,984.81 28,894.67 14,351. 

Rural 95.04 25,694.67 4,305. 

Fayetteville 1,688.22 2.850.00 8,437. 

Hope Mills 201.55 350.00 1,609. 

Ciurrituck 1,427.77 8,936.56 3,736. 

Dare 669.42 2,706.51 1,652. 

Davidson. 4,432.48 25,522.62 10,616. 

Rural 1,926.83 21,727.47 143. 

Lexington 72.07 2,204.15 6,399. 

Thomasville 2,433.58 1,591.00 4,073. 



52$ 371.56 
00 715.60 
851.52 
20 1,683.66 
00 1,683.66 

04 

16' 

43, 1,381.31 
76 889.23 
50 889.23 

04. 

22 

14 579.16 
37 579.16 

77 

17 263.58 
92 1,731.31 
92 1,731.31 

00... 

00 

85 1,238.40 
57 1,295.44 
26 1,295.44 

31 

62 2,119.53 
25 2,119.53 

20.... 

17 

65 478.38 
95 290.01 
37 1,589.39 
31 1,589.39 

58 

48 



1,501.02 750.00 
2,618.80. 750.00. 
2,618.80 750.00. 



600.00 

700.00 610.00 



80.00 
80.00 



347.94 250.00 150.00 

2,026.67 250.00 14,539.25 127.50 

2,026.67 250.00 1,650.00 127.50 

12,889.25 

1,545.17 500.00 850.00 70.00 

750.00 7,500.00 l,279.0o! 

750.00! 2,500.00 1,279.00 

■ 5,000.00... 

1,550.70 800.00 1,901.00 151 67 

I 
1,550.70 800.00 151.67 

1,901.00 



730.58 


250.00 


20.00 


2,792.55 




416.57 


500.00 
500.00 


625.00 


416.57 


625.00 



Total 
Fund. 



$1,241.32$ 250.00$ 600.00$ $ 

2,197.60 500.00 200.00 300 00 

1,921.89 250.00.. 366.35 

1,984.95 500.00 600.00 174.50 

1,984.95 500.00 174.50 



7,550.37 

17,893.77 

13,239.57 

44,695.57 

30,499.92 

7,810.45 

6,385.20 

23,710.57 

26,883.36 

17,263.37 

6,838.04 

2.781.95 

18,862.99 

12,467.64 

6,395.35 

3,909.88 

56,159.80 

32,802.55 

5,285.00 

18,072.25 

43,704.88 

55,602.68 

33,447.57 

22,155.11 

51,754.00 

34,716.86 

14,876.42 

2,160.72 

15,579.94 

8,111.44 

43,702.43 

26,928.57 

8,675.80 

8,098.06 



♦Deficit. 



School Fund, 1909-'10. 



133 



Table I. School Fond and Sources — Continued. 



Balance 
1908-'(». 



County 

Funds, 

18c. Tax, 

etc. 



Ix>cal 

Taxes, 
etc. 



State 
Fir.st 



.State 
Second 



$100,000. $100,000. 



State 

for 

Public 

High 



Bonds, 
Loan 
Fund, 
Bor- 
rowed 



Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Rural 


$ 3,004.52 

1,048.09 

10,709.45 

9,370.44 

1.339.01 

129.77 

*414.42 

129.77 

8,047.17 

8,019.59 


$ 


Durham.. 

Edgecombe 

Rural 




Tarboro 

Forsyth. . ._ 




Rural... 




Winston 




Kernersville 

Franklin 


27.58 

5,512.92 

1,288.60 

459.28 

3,374.55 

390.49 

546.05 

514,80 




Franklinton 

Louisburg 

Young.sville 




Rural... . . . .. 




Gastonia. . 




Cherry ville 

Gates . 


31.25 

782.17 

230.61 

763.41 

*2,469.75 

763.41 

3.57.34 

7,408.53 

7.183.61 




Graham. . 




Granville . 




Rural 

Oxford. . 




Greene 

Guilford 

Rural 

Greensboro 




High Point 

Guilford College. .. 


224.92 





Schools. Money, 
etc. 



Li- 
braries, 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. 



8,892 
16,509 
61,373 
38,607 
22,766 
25,748 
22,748 

3,000 
49,028 
35,318 
12,420 

1,290 

19,379 

17,015 

464 

1,200 

700 

33,359 

29,359 

3,000 

1,000 
10,334 

3,720 
22,871 
20,871 

2,000 

9,908 
80,919 
63,957, 
10,000, 

6,. 532. 
430. 



08 $ 262. 

15 7,837. 

14 40,627. 

00 6,965. 

14 33,662. 

63 11,711. 

63 3,184. 
00 8,527. 

64 17,171. 
64 1.184. 
00 15,2.50. 
00 737. 
90 9,. 5.35. 
90 1,267. 
00 3,2.55. 
00 3,2.50. 
00 1,762. 
24 16,048. 
24 6,724. 
00 7,-577. 
00 1,746. 
30 2,031. 
75 295. 
71 10,705. 
71 5,660. 
00 5,045. 

06 

17 55,967. 

17 17,265. 

00 21,957. 

00 16,052. 
00^ 690. 



34!$ 794.61 S.... $ .500.00? S 270.00$ 

77I 1,379.77 880.65 750.00 .300.00 1,078.11 

74' 1,879.06 750.00 26,149.40 10. Oo! 

.54 1,879.06 750.00 500.00 10.00 

20.. -- 25,649.40 

691 1,736.45 600.00 900.00 35.00 

04j 1,736.45.... _ 600.00 35.00 

65. 900.00 ' 



92 
59 
00! 
33 
62 
58 
18. 



2,449.82 1,000.00 1,800.00 730.50 

2,449.82 1,000.00 730.50 



1,800.00 

500.00 

.500.00 ..., 



1,485.52 2,061.25 
1,485.52 2,061.25 



121.75 
121.75 



00 



86j.. 
77 



2,129.47. 
2,129.47. 



875.09 1,900.00 873.46 
875.00 1,900.00 873.46 



00] 

46 678.57 1,091.88 500,00 700.00 

29j 360.00 . 

95 1,435.48 1,583.34 7.50.00 2,850.00 
39 1,435.48 1 .583, .34 750,00 2,000 00 

56 850.00 , 

711.82: 896.45 500.00 

25 3,1.53.59 1,125.00 5,125.00 

94 3,153.59 1,125.00 3,625.00 

46. . 



40,00 



544.92 
544.92 

45.00 
916.12 
916.12 



90. 
95, 



1,500.00, 



Total 
Fund. 



13,723.55 
29,783.54 
141,498.79 
58,082.04 
83,416.75 
40,861.54 
28,304.12 
12,557.42 
80,228.05 
48,703.14 
27,670.00 

3,8.54,91 
38,596.96 
23.740.60 

4,178.46 

7,824.55 

2,8.53.35 
55,731.99 
42.376.72 
10,577.47 

2,777.80 
16,158.38 

4,606.65 
41,. 504. 81 
32,845.84 

8.6.58.97 
12,418.67 
154,614.66 
97,226.43 
31,957.46 
24,309.82 

1,120.95 



"Deficit. 



134 



School Fund, 1909-'10. 



Table I. School Fund and Sources — Continued. 



I County- 
Balance Funds, 
1908-09. J 18c. Tax, 

I etc. 



Local 

Taxes, 

etc. 



Bonds, 

State Loan 

State State ' for Fund 

First Second , Public Bor-' 

$100,000. .?100,000. High rowed 

Schools. Money, 

etc' 



Li- 
braries, 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. 



Halifax S18,103,89 

Rural I 16,091.08 

Scotland Neck *233.30 

Weldon I *217.0i; 

Enfield 881. 58| 

Roanoke Rapids . . 1 , 131 . 23 

Harnett i 2,687.51 

Rural 1 1,302.34 

Dunn ; 1,385.17 

Haywood 14,413.86 

Rural ! 14,161.96! 

Waynesville 261.90 

Henderson 1,549.15 

Rural 1,460.47 



$ 29,987.23j817,905.22:$ 1,614.74$ 1$ 500.00$ 850.0ol$ 580. OOJ 

24,412.23: tl, 614.74] 500.00. ! 580.00 

997. 50i 5,476 44 

2,082.75 3,700.87 I 8-50. 00. ._ 

1,299.50 5,240.72 __ 

1,195.25 3,487.19 . 

- 

18,584.01 4,958.90 1,224.65^ 911. 18^ 500.00- 72. 20: 

17,344.01 1,. 537. 96 1,224.651 911.18' 500.00 _... 72.20 

1,240.00 3,420.94 

17,399.86j 4,801.59 1,155.06| 500.00 250.00 49,64i 

15,524.86: 699.19 1,155.06! ., 500.00 250.00 49.641 

1,875.00' 4,102.40 .. 1 



HendersonYille. . 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville 

Statesville 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

Smithfield 

Jones 

Lee 

Rural 

Sanf ord 



88.68 

666.64 

5,575.49 

4,460.44 

* 182. 35 

1,275.14 

3,185.30: 

455. 81 1 

11,069.89; 

8,595.89' 

1,424.00 

.1,050.001 

2,696.05! 

i 

521.661 
521.19 

.47 



Lenoir 1,560.^5 

I 
Rural... *991.16 



Kinston.. 
LaGrange 



1,494.05 

G6.70 



2,355.69 500.00 1,000.00 405. 00| 



13,241.04| 5,902.70 882.711 

11,772.07 3,157.67 882. 71| 2,355. 69J 500.00 1,000.00 405. Oo! 

1,468.971 2,745.03 ' ' 

I , .... 

11,4.34.94 2,200.98; 925.56 804.65: 650.00 250.00 280. Oo| 

4,880.84, 2,641.26i t --: 2,641.82] 250.00; 1,000.00 20.001 

32,447.15! 16,631.65' 1,928.08 938. 6o| 600.00 2,950.00 169.25' 

27,709. 30| 2,663.73 1,928.08 938.60 600.00 1,950.00 169.251 

1,816.00 5,099.87 

2,921.85 8,868.05i 1,000.00 

10,547.14 5,417.88 804.04 2,411.281 250.00 20.001 

31,016.21 14,339.94; 2,314.75|..: ' 850.00 150.00 

28,376.10! 8,831.79 2,314.75 .: ,8.50.00 150.00.. 

■ 1,450.11: 2,359.47... ! 

I _-, 

1,190.00; 3,148.68.. '.. ....L. 

I 

6,566.92i 2,242.56 478.72 824.33 475.00 1,400.00 110.00 



661.09 
661.09 



11,249,39; 5,412.40 

9,828.20 1,804.81 

1,421.19. 3,607.59 

21,309.4l| 12,123.68! 1,137.23 
17,124.411 165.13 1,137.23 



1,127.42 
1,127.42 



3,379.50 



250.00 700.00 94.95 

250.00 94.95! 

- 700.00 I 

300.00 1,035.00 3O.OOI 
300.00 30.00 



9,410.76. 



805.501 2,547.79' 1,035.00 

♦Deficit. tAppropriation of previous year. JNot received during fiscal year. 



Total 
Fund. 



69,541.08 
43,198.05 
0,473.94 
6,633.62 
7,421.80 
5,813.67 
28,938.45 
22, 892. 34 
0,046.11 
38, 570. 01' 
»32,340.71 
6,229.30 
25,836.29 
21,533.61 
4,302.68 
17.212.77 
17,009.41 
60,125.17 
35,958.96 
8,191.01 
15,975.20 
19,906.15 
59,740.79 
49,118.53 
5,233.58 
5,388.08 
14,793.-58 
20,016.91 
14,287.60 
5,729.25 
37,496.07 
18,756.77 
14.284.31 
4,4,54 99 



School Fund, 1909-'10. 



135 



Table I. School Fund and Sources — Continued. 



I County 
Balance Funds, 



1908-09. 



Lincoln I 1,197.05 

Rural 1,197.05 

Lincolnton *238.01 

Macon . 950.63 



18c. Tax, 
etc. 



Local State 
Taxes, First 
etc. S100,000. 



State 
State I for 
Second 1 Public 
$100,000. I High 



Bonds, 
Loan 
Fund, 
Bor- 
rowed 



Schools. Money, 
etc. 



Li- 
braries, 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. 



Madison 12,100.98 

Martin 18,856.15 

Rural 18,394.75 

AViUiamston *106.66 

Robersonville 461.40 

McDowell 8,786.84 

Rural 8,733.33 

Marion 53.51 

Mecklenburg 2,787.09 

Rural 2,787.09 

Charlotte *10.07 

Mitchell 703.66 

Montgomery.. 1,375.28 

Rural ' 875.78 

Troy 499.50 

Moore | 5,224.31 

Rural 1 3,992.47 

Carthage ! 533.26 

Southern Pines 698.58' 

Nash I 4,742.57 

Rural I 4,742.57: 

Rocky Mount ■ *282.59 

New Hanover 6 , 580 . 50 



Rural 6,580.50 

Wilmington ' 

Northampton ! 118.44 

Onslow j 1,023. 5r 

Orange j 395.59 

Pamlico 3,041.10 



14,639.41$ 6,393.36}$ 1,038. 17j$ 

13,179.41 1,847.96 1,038.17' 

1,460.00 4,545.40 . 

7,694.40 2,848.45! 745.08 

12,081.48 1,869.441 1,355.09 

16,859.96 5,651.981 

14,804.96 518.71! t 

1,070.00 3,361.62! 

985.00 1,771.65'-. 

16,705.131 5,647.90i 979.21 

15,505. 13i 2,582.65 

1,200.00; 3,065.25 

86,678.03 46,426.24 
59,793.61 
26,884.42 



l,186.9l|$ 500.00,$ 1,000.00$ 50.00S 
1,186.911 .500.00 1,000.00 50.00 



972.00 

2,216.59 

994.29 

994.29 



979.21 



1,927.89 
1,927.89 



750.00 
500.00 
500.00 
500.00 



600.00, 



421.32! 
395.00: 
620.00, 
620.001 



500.00 
500.00 



t6,480.85 

39,945.39 

9,083.91 542. 20i 1,112.90 

10,632.89 2,277.79 900.71 

9,587.291 1,441.80 900.71 

1,045.60! 83*.99L- .-- 

18,480.84 6,649.28} " 998.75 

17,360.84 1, 769.41! 998.75 

840.00 3,369.93 
I 
280.00 1,509.94' 

31,027.95! 24,178.19j 1,705.43 

26,313.23! 7,671.31 1,705.43 

4,714.72 16,506 

52,024.40 1,317.89 

12,031.46 .--- 1,317.89 

39,992.94 

18,873.12 2,233.83 1,213.00 

11,888.64 4,030.83 806.60! 

15,024.80 495.70 845.52 

6,476.34 3,191.81 597.50 



1,000.00 
1,000.00 



2,500.00 
2,500.00. 



61.11, 
61.11 



1,343.48 
688.30 
688.30 



500.001 
500. 00 1 
500. 00 ! 



18,000.00 183.90' 

: 183.90! 

18,000.00 .-I 

40.00; 

! 

180.00 ^ 10.00' 
180. 00 ! 10.001 



2,476.09 350. OO! 9,010.00; 960.54 
2,476.09 350.00 ' 960.54 



500.00 



9,010.00 

2,500.00! 873.75 



500.001 2,500.00 873.75 



882.07: 500.00' 

1,284.75, 400.00 

976.95 500.00 

2,087.89 500.00 



1,475.00 



831.39 
365.50 
556.40 



Total 
P'und. 



26,004.90 
19,999.50 
6,005.40 
14,381.88 
31,118.58 
43,482.38 
35,832.71 
4,431.62 
3,218.05 
37,108.08 
30,289.32 
6,818.76 
155,075.26 
70,245.45 
84,829.81 
13,326.15 
16,564.97 
14,183.88 
2,381.09 
44.149.81 
27,908.10 
4,743.19 
11,498.52 
65,527.89 
44,306.29 
21,221.60 
59.921.79 
19,929.85 
39,992.94 
24,651.85 
21,274.83 
18.794.96 
15,894.64 



♦Deficit. tNot received when report was made. 



136 



School Fund, 1909-'10. 



Table I. School Fund and Sources — Continued. 



Pasquotank 

Rural 

Elizabeth City. 



Balance 
1908-09. 



$ 1,558.61 

46.52 

1,512.09 



Pender j 3,107.52 

Perquimans ■ 1,230.38 



County 

Funds, 

18c. Tax, 

etc. 



Rural - - - - - 


1,207.95 

22.43 

753.04 


Hertford 


Person 


Rural 


323.99 


Roxboro i 


429.05 


Pitt -. 


14,505.45 


Rural . -- 


14,245.76 


Greenville 


259.69 


Polk ..- . - 


1,336.62 
544.32 


Randolph 


Rural - - 


544.32 
*1,092.49 


Ashboro- .: 


Randleman. - _ . 




Richmond 


3,739.37 


Rural- - -- 


3,429.26 


Rockingham 


303.60 


Hamlet 


6.51 


Robeson 


2,958.59 


Rural 


2,185.95 


Lumberton . 




Maxton 


772.64 
351.36 


Rockingham 


Rural 


*37.39 


Reidsville 


351.36 


Rowan... 1 


7,829.97 


Rural 


7,829.97 


Salisbury 




Rutherford . 


810.21 



19,076.17 

13,156.17 

5,920.00 

11,692.90 

9,568.98 

8,268.98 

1,300.00 

13,388.10 

12,288.10 

1,100.00 

26,513.11 

24,713.11 

1,800.00 

5,315.86 

25,998.93 

22,048.93 

3,100.00 

850.00 

16,696.59 

14,761 39 

1,133.80 

801.40 

39,654.91 

37',547.47 

1,277.44 

830.00 

35,465.37 

31,078.37 

4,387.00 

42,604.82 

36,010.82 

6,594.00 

19,021.74 



$15,615.00 



Local 

Taxes, 

etc. 



15,615.00 
5,682.11 
4,335.10 



State 

First 

$100,000. 



State 
Second 
$100,000. 



906.12 
906.02 



823.06 
620.64 
620.641 



1,350.00 
380.00 
380.00 



State 

for 

Public 

Hish 

Schools. 



$ 



500.00 



S58,607.40|$ 297.48 
2,000.00| 297.48 

56,607.40| 

75.00 



4,335.40 
3,512.91 



996.18 
996.18 



3,512.91 
11,969.60! 2,159.13 



2,159.13 



5,278.88 
6,690.72 

415.62 431.59 

I 
7,725.68! 1,739.71 

i 
4,296.61' 1,739.71 

1,400.00; 

2,029.07; 

8,723.43! 1,155*41 

1,097.041 1.155.41 

3,795.44 



3,830.95 

21,062.16 

14,145.16 

4,263.81 

2,653.19 

11,070.16 

3,503.25 

7,566.91 

7,822.05 

1,822.05 

6,000.00 

1,604.25 



500.00 
500.00 



750.00 
750.00 



334.80 
1,649.54 
1,649.54 



250.00 
1.000.00 
1,000.00 



2,750.80 
2,750.80 



2,314 07 
2,314.07 



1,686.56 
1,686.56 



1.641.84 



1,408.7 
1,408.77 



700.00 
700.00 



Bonds, 
Loan 
Fund, 
Bor- 
rowed 
Money, 
etc. 



Li- 
braries, 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. 



Total 
Fund. 



450.00 
450.00 



1,300.00 



1,300.00 
3,052.50 



3,052.50 



2,750.00 
2,000.00 



1,000.00 
1,000.00 



750.00 
750.00 



750.00 
750.00 



1,888.83 



250.00 



750.00 
5,854 09 
500.00 
354.09 
5,000.001 
1,800.00 
1,800.00 



900.00 
900.00 



5,000.00 
5,000.00 



200.00 



85.00 
85.00 



250 00 
25ff.00 



267.01 
267.01 



920.67 
920.67 



368.53 
368.53 



730.00 
730.00 



342.301 



96,060.68 

16,406.19 

79,654.49 

23,230.59 

16,670.40 

11,012.57 

5,657.83 

20,700.23 

14,358.27 

6.341.96 

58,949.79 

47,146.88 

11,802.91 

8,084.49 

41,675.19 

33,546.12 

4.500 00 

3,629.07 

37,789.56 

22.563.77 

5,586.93 

9,6.38.86 

69,594.99 

59,797.91 

5,541.25 

4,255.83 

52,259.73 

39,954.46 

12,305.27 

66,423.40 

53,829.40 

12,594 00 

25,759 17 



♦Deficit. 



School Fund, 1909-'10. 



137 



Table I. School Fund and Sources — Continued. 



Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 

Scotland 

Rural 

Laurinburg, _ 

Starily 

Rural 

Albemarle 

Stokes 

Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy . . 

Swain 

Transylvania . . 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Rural 

Monroe 

Vance 

Rural 

Henderson . . 

Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive. 
Fremont 



County 
Balance 1 Funds, 
1908-'09. 18c. Tax, 
etc. 



3,910.58 
3,835.55 
75.03 
1,572.42 
1,572.42 



2,263.22 

2,151.63 

111.59 

542.75 

1,061.38 

360.05 

701.33 

1,844.37 

6,360.37 

1,377.71: 

2,608.96, 

2,285.801 

323.16 

3,089.64' 

3,027.64 

62.00 

6,372.40 

2,724.141 

3,648.26! 

31.181 

1,588.57 

1,583.48 



5.09 
1,590.97 
8,352.58 
3,591.31 
148.68 
1,587.46 
3,025.13 



Local 

Taxes, 

etc. 



State I State 

First i Second 

$100,000. $100,000. 



21,334.75 

20,254.75 

1,080.00 

10,658.23 

9,429.05 

1,229.18 

13,936.31 

12,641.31 

1,295.00 

12,759.78 

24,796.87 

22,996.87 

1,800.00 

8,560.21 

6,806.69 

3,807.74 

25,572.11 

23,172.11 

2,400 00 

19,605.26 

13,905.26 

5,700.00 

79,776.34 

64,581.30 

15,195.04 

15,456.04 

8,981.87 

7,331.87 

650.00 

1,000.00 

7,705.98 

37,264.69 

30,846.44 

4,513.00 

1,123.00 

782,25 



$11,917.57 

I 

9,669.00 
2,248.57 
4,586.33 



4,586.33 
2,989.43 

2,989.43 

7,513.77 

2,887.50 
4,626.27 
2,075.17 
4,411.47 



State 

for 

Public 

High 

Schools. 



$ 1,696.86$ 2,163.37 



12,392.68 

5,863.23 

6,529.45 

9,571.27 

2,127.62 

7,443.65 

55,642.49 

13,399.53 

42.242.96 

6,393.59 

4,787.85 

837.52 

1,026.39 

2,923.94 



24,467.31 
3,218.17 

15, 622.. 30 
3,760.28 
1,866.56 



i,e 



2,163.37 



$ 750.00 
750.00 



575.73 
575.73 



1,190.03 
1,190.03 



1,187.1 

1,769.88 

1,769.88 



542.31 

406.22 

320.14 

1,853.35 

1,853.35 



1,125.92 
1,125.92 



3,529.13 
3,529.13 



1,203.57 

621.67 
621.67 



892.31 
1,954.47 
1,954.47 



789.99 
789.99 



1,913.45 
1,350.00 
1,350.00 



1,803.31 



1,571.45 
1,571.45 



926.25 
89.83 
89.83 



500.00 
500.00 



750.00 
875.00 
875.00 



Bonds, 
Loan 
Fund, 
Bor- 
rowed 
Money, 
etc. 



E 1,790.00 

1,290.00 

500.00 

31,070.83 



31,070.83 
800.00 
600.00 



625.00 
1,008.10 



750.00 
500.00 



500.00 
500.00 



1,008.10 
100.00 
750.00 



2,752.54 



500.00 
500.00 



1,350.00 
1,350.00 



500.00 



2,752.54 



13,824.22 

5,400.00 

8,424.22 

1,500.00 

.500.00 

500.00 



Li- 
braries, 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. 



Total 
Fund. 



1,876.80 



1,000.00 
1,000.00 



250.00 
1,774.40 
800.00 
224.40 
750.00 



95.00 
95.00 



540.00 
540.00 



20.00 
20.00 



400.00 
95.00 
95.00 



154.21 



30.00 
30.00 



91.25 
91.25 



990.14 
990.14 



20.00 



71.45 
71.45 



43,658.13 
39,754.53 

3,903.60 
49,503.54 
12,617.20 
36,886.34 
21,788.98 
17,392.96 

4,396.02 
18,178.10 
38,470.00 
30,334.30 

8,135.70 
13,872.06 
21,192.27 

5,505.59 
47,281.09 
35,275.94 
12,005.15 
33,983.34 
20,777.69 
13,205.65 
161,484.72 
91,974.24 
69,510.48 
26,030.63 
16,569.79 
10,964.37 

1,676.39 

3,929.03 
12,316.06 
74,884.90 
41,481.84 
20,508.38 

7,220.74 

5,673.94 



138 



School Fu^-d, 1909-'10. 



Table I. School Fund and Sources — Continued. 



Balance 
1908-'09. 



County 

Funds, 

18c. Tax, 

etc. 



Local 

Taxes, 

etc. 



State State 

First Second 

$100,000. $100,000. 





Bonds, 


State 


Loan 


for 


Fund, 


Public 


Bor- 


High 


rowed 


Schools. 


Jloney, 




etc. 



Li- 
braries, 
Private 
Dona- 
tions, 
etc. 



Total 
Fund. 



Wilkes $ 

Rural 

North Wilkesboro _ 482 . 57 

Wilson 20,360,20 

Rural 11,935.29 

WUson City 200.92 

Lucama 8,223,99 

Yadkin 1,377,41 

Yancey 910,10 



835.77$ 17,593,23$ 7,317.641$ 1,844,95$ 5,234.67$ 750.00 $ 2,200.00 $ 48.91$ 35,825.17 

353.20 16,915,88 3,736.52 1,844.95 5,234.67 7.50.00 2.200.00 48.91 31,084.13 

677.35 3,581.12 ._ _ _ 4,741.04 

27,871.35 23,626.08 1,279.27, 250,00 7,000,00 250,00 80,636.90 

21.578.35 12,398.471 1, 279.27; 2.50 00 1,000.00 250,00 48,691.38 

5,996,00 10,993.76 __. 6,000.00 23,190.68 

297.00 233.85: 8,754.84 

9,069.84 490.80 930.02 1,108.80 550,00. 10.00 13,5.36.87 

5,246.03 101.23 763.59 1,950.56 20.00 8,991.51 



1,991,908.57 877,799.91115,253.26100,967.54 48,350.00 294,077.49 25,410.66 3,788,321.37 

1,684,102.15,296,914.63115,253.26100,967.54 48,350.001 66,775.0025,410.66 2,615.408.78 
' i ■ ; 
City 56,918.401 307,806.42.580,885.28 (227,302.49:.. 1,172,912.59 



North Carolina 334, .553. 94 

Rural 277,635.54 



School Fund, 1909-'! 0. 



139 



SUPPLEMENT TO TABLE L RURAL SCHOOL FUNDS NOT REPORTED 

BY COUNTY TREASURERS. 



1 
Counties. 


Local Donat^ions 
Taxes. Libraries. 


Donations i 
for ' 
Buildings. 


To 

Increase 
School ' 
Term. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Total. 


Alamance 


$ ...' $ 12.00 ' 


$ 924.75 


$ 543.30 ; 


% 


S 1,480.05 


Alexander. i 






Alleghany 












Anson 


10.00 

10.00 




250.00 




260.00 


Ashe 






10 00 


Beaufort . 




1 


65.00 
100.00 




65 00 


Bertie . 








100 00 


Bladen. . . .. . 




. 






Brunswick. .. 











Buncombe . . . 






140.00 




140.00 


Burke . .. . 


' " " 






Cabarrus .. 




300.00 


264.75 





564 75 


Caldwell. ..... 








Camden. . . _ .. 










Carteret 




75.00 
500.00 
530.00 

1,275.75 


85.00 

250.00 

75.00 

1,795.67 




160 00 


Caswell . 


50.00 




800 00 


Catawba . . . . 


6.00 


45.00 


656 00 


Chatham . 


1,295.00 40.50 


4,406.92 


Cherokee.. . .. 






Chowan ...... 


7.00 


200.00 


70.00 


350.00 


627 00 


Clay.. . 






Cleveland 










Columbus .. 


22.00 


1,534.90 


455.00 




22 00 


Craven . 




1,989.90 


Cumberland .. . 






Currituck _ . 


16.00 


539.29 


156.13 


711 42 


Dare 






Davidson 




400.00 
831.70 
166.10 




400.00 


Davie 

Duplin 

Durham. . 


13.72 


256.00 

35.00 

300.00 

300.00 

45.00 

1,655.50 

40.00 


34.95 


831.70 

470.77 

35.00 


Edgecombe . 


25.00 


100.00 




425.00 


Forsyth . 


22.40 


322.40 


Franklin.. . ___ .. 


1 


500.00 


1 545.00 


Gaston... . .. 




1,655 .50 


Gates 




1 


40.00 



140 



School Eund, 1909-'10. 



Supplement to Table I. Rural School Funds not Reported by County Treasurers. 



Counties. 


Local 
Taxes. 


Donations 

for 
Libraries. 


Donations 

for 
Buildings. 


To 

Increase 
School 
Term. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Total. 


■ 
Graham . S S 


$_... 


S - 


$ 


$ 


Granville - 












Greene -- - --' - 


82.39 


352.85 


181.83 
1,850.00 




617.07 


Guilford --- - - 






1,850.00 


Halifax -- - 












Harnett - - - 














Havwood - - 












Henderson - . . 








1,054.72 




1,054.72 


Hertford - 












Hyde - 














Iredell ,. -. 




120.00 
30.00 


800.00 


120.00 


125.00 



1,165.00 


Jackson - _ _ - - - 




4,000.00 175.00 


4,205.00 


Johnston 












Jones - 












Lee - - - - 












Lenoir 














Lincoln 




30.00 


200,00 


50.00 




280.00 


Macon 








Madison _ _ . _ 












Martin 






875.00 97.50 




972.50 


McDowell 






500.00 200.00 




700.00 


Mecklenburg - _ _ _ - 






805.58 


1,530.00 




2.335.58 


Mitchell 










Montffomerv 


" 




1 ■ 




Moore _. .- -_ --- 




105.00 


2,295.00^ -1 5.34.09 

11 00 I 16.94 1,521.75 


2,934.09 


Nash 




1,549.69 


New Hanover 








66.63 


66.63 


Northampton _. 




30.00 


3,800.00 300.00 


4,130.00 


Onslow 




256.57 
323.15 






256.57 


Orange . . _ _ _ 






397.00 


104.36 


824.51 


Pamlico 


!, 


70.00 




70.00 


Pasquotank 












Pender. . _- . _ - 




35.00 


1,350.00 


1 

600.00 100.00 


2.085.00 


Perfjuimans 








Person 












Pitt- _ 




160.00 


610.00 


420.00 1 2.660.00 3,850.00 


Polk 











School Fund, 1909-'10. 



141 



Supplement to Table I. Rural School Funds not Reported by County Treasurers. 



Counties. 


Local 
Taxes. 


Donations 

for 
Libraries. 


Donations 

for 
Buildings. 


To 

Increase 
School 
Term. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Total. 


Randolph . 

Richmond 


$ 


$ 


S 


« 

656 00 
418.50 
125.00 
184.25 
356.05 
1,325.80 


$ 


$ 

656.00 


Robeson _ I 


29.85 
45.00 


435.47 

1,734.00 

1,453.51 

11.00 

707.01 




883.82 


Rockingham _. 






1,904.00 


Rowan 


2,000.00 




3,637.76 


Rutherford 


111.62 
95.00 


359.61 
1,163.55 


838.28 


Sampson . 




3,291.36 


Scotland 






Stanly. . . 


i 




25.00 
273.40 




25.00 


Stokes. . . - 






277.50 


143.84 


694.74 


Surry _.- -. . 








Swain .. .... 










Transylvania 




15.00 




358.03 


47.64 


420.67 


Tyrrell. . ... .. 








Union .. .. . _ 




30.00 

8.60 

77.38 

42.25 




600.00 

45.00 

1,421.05 

539.00 




630.00 


Vance _ . 




121.00 




174.60 


Wake . _ 






1,498.43 


Warren .. .... 




3.50 


23.45 


608.23 


Washington. 






Watauga .. . . 






400.00 

319.90 

1,109.00 

669.98 
950.00 


130.00 
150.00 
177.00 
135.00 
6.00 




530.00 


Wayne . . 




18.55 

115.00 

57.10 

3.00 


230.16 
573.00 


718.61 


Wilkes ... 




1,974.00 


Wilson 




192.10 


Yadkin.. . . 






678.98 


Yancey . 






950.00 




,_ , 






Total.. . 


3,295.00 


1,452.96 


31,709.22 


21.252.58 


8,261.56 


65,971.32 







142 



School. Fund, 1909-'10. 



TABLE II. PER CAPITA AMOUNT RAISED FOR EACH CHILD, 1909-'10. 

This table shows the school fund actually raised during the year, the per 
capita amount raised for each child of school age, the total amount of all tax- 
able property, and the amount of taxable property for each child of school age. 



Rural. 



Total available fund, 1909-10 

Total available fund, 1908-'09 

Increase 

School population, 1909-10 

School population, 1908-09 

Increase 

Available fund for each child 

Total funds raised for schools by taxation, 1909-10- 
Total funds raised for schools by taxation, 1908-09- 

Increase _ 

Per capita raised by taxation for each child, 1909-10. 
Per capita raised by taxation for each child, 1908-09. 

Increase -. 

Value of all taxable property 

Taxable property for each child, 1909-10 



2,377,662.47 

2,325,863.12 

51,799.35 

605,672 

598,657 

7,015 

3.92 

1,743,270.47 

1,715,677.89 

27,592.58 

2.88 

2.86 

.02 



City. 



1,172,912.59 

1,093,239.91 

79,672.68 

129,496 

128.908 

588 

9.05 

888,691.70 

864,531.27 

24,160.43 

6.80 

6.70 

.10 



North 
Carolina. 



$3, 550, 575. be 

3,419,103.03 

131,472.03 

735,168 

727,565 

7.603 

$ 4.82 

2,631,962.17 

2,580,029.16 

51,933.01 

3.58 

3.54 

.04 

593,387,413.00 

807.14 



TABLE III. AMOUNT RAISED BY TAXATION FOR EACH $100 TAXABLE 
PROPERTY FOR EACH INHABITANT IN 1900. 



Available fund for each child . 



Rural. 



Per capita amount raised by taxation for each child of 
school age, 1909-' 10 



3.92 
2.88 



Taxable property for each child, 1909-' 10 

Amount raised for each $100 taxable property, 1909-'10_ . 

Per capita amount raised (1909-10) for each inhabitant 
(census 1900) 



City. 



9.05 
6.80 



North 
Carolina. 



4.82 

3.58 

807.14 

.44 

1.39 



B. SCHOOL EXPENDITURES. 



TABLE IV. SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES, 1909-'10. 

This table gives the total amount speut in teaching and supervision, build- 
ings and supplies, administration, etc. ; the balance on hand June .30, 1910, and 
the total expenditures. 

Summary of Table IV and Compakison with 1!>08-'0'J. 



Rural. 



City. 



North 
Carolina. 



Total expenditures, 1909-10 

Total expenditures, 1908-09 

Increase 

Teaching and supervision, 1909-' 10 

Teaching and supervision, 1908-09 

Increase 

Buildings and supplies, 1909-' 10 

Buildings and supplies, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Administration, 1909-' 10 

Administration, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Public high schools 

Loans repaid, interest, etc.- 

Balance on hand June 30, 1910 

Percentage for teaching and supervision, 1909-10 
Percentage for buildings and supplies, 1909-10. . 
Percentage for administration, 1909-' 10 

♦Decrease. 



$ 2,126,695.50 

2,029,023.77 

97,671.73 

1,433,650.78 

1,336,866.08 

96,784.70 

424,442.62 

434,818.98 

*10,376.36 

107,037.59 

92,499.40 

14,538.19 

123,368.39 

51,639.86 

250,691.97 

67.4 

19.9 

5.0 



1,052,255.00 

1,040,236.59 

12,018.41 

688,954.98 

638,070.52 

50,884.46 

243,253.30 

277,020.98 

*33,767.68 

17,199.67 

23,160.84 

*5,961.17 

102,847.05 
121,032.59 
65.5 
23.1 
1.6 



$3,178,9,50.50 

3,069,260.36 

109,690.14 

2,122,605.76 

1,974,936.60 

147,669.16 

667,695.92 

711,839.90 

*44,144.04 

124,237.26 

115,660.24 

8,577.02 

123,368.39 

154,486.91 

371,724.56 

67.1 

21.0 

3.9 



144 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



Table IV. Summary of Expenditures — Continued. 



Total 
Fund. 



Alamance 8 51,516.93 

Ruralt 29,105.89 

Burlington : 11,728.56 



Total 
Expendi- 
tures. 



$ 50,996.36 



Spent for Spent for | Bor- 

Teaching \ Build- Spent for rowed 
and ings and ' Admin- Money 



Super- 
vision. 



Graham 

Haw River. 

Mebane 

Alexander 

Alleghany 



5,309.51 
2,889.80 
2,483.17 
15,511.78 
8,623.00 



Anson , 32,369.39 

Rural I 25,780.74 

I 

Wadesboro I 6,588.65 

Ashe I 17,382.01 

Beaufort 56,281.35 

Rural ; 32,139.91 

Washington ._ _ 19,854.70 

Belhaven i 4,286.741 

Bertie I 32,677.63 

Rural 

Aulander 

Windsor 

Bladen 21,981.34 

Brunswick 17,041.89 



28,670.47 

11,393.87 
5,875.26 
2,860.67 
2,196.09 

13,746.50 
8,595.26 

30,498.58 



I 29,960.35 



23,909. 93| 
6,588.65 
15,438.01 
52,245.33 
28,805.56 
20,476.77 

2,963.00 

I 

28,069.27| 

26,293. 63| 22,825. 27j 

2,455.00 1, 870,00* 

3,929.00 3,374.00; 

i 

18,803.66| 

11,238. 39i 



Buncombe 129,129.05! 130,725.57 

■ 

Rural 63,962.46 64,509.131 

Asheville 65, 166., =59 



Burke 

Rural 

Morgan ton 

Cabarrus 

Rural 

Concord 

Caldwell 

Rural 

Lenoir 

Granite 

Rhodhiss-. 



25,959.04 
15,803.15 
10,155.89 
48,314.41 
28,046.63 
20,267.78 
33,171.19 
19,231.75 
11,566.49 
1,180.21 
1,192.74 



25,546.44 

15,993.76 

9,552.68 

46,001.90 

25,734.18! 

i 

20,267.721 

32,598.27j 

19,204.231 

11,496.45; 

1,154.60 

742,99 



Sup- istration.' Repaid, 
plies. etc. 



12,248,71 

8,929,19 

4,802.00, 

2,080.45 

1,900.00 

9,499.36; 

6,588.69 

17,032.21 

12,242,21 

4,790,00 

12,148,87 

30,607.13 

15,951.63 

12,014.50 

2,641.00 

19,848.77 

15,918,77 

1,460.00 

2,470.00| 

12,970,59 

9,244,47 

73,589.31 

29,134.25 

66,216.44: 44,455.06 



16,071.02 
10,532.27 

5,538,75 
26,877.87 
14,748,67 
12,129.20 
19,817.15 
11,615.90 

6,703.75 
977.50 
520.00 



5 7,758.23 

4,754.72 

1,935.44 

586,64 

206.01 

275.42 

2,468.38 

1,106,08 

6,637.95 

5,229,75; 

1,408,20 

1,174 91 

10,491,19 

4,706.92 

5,462.27 

322.00 

4,853.11 

3,539.11 

410.00 

904. OOj 

3,149,451 

1,548,211 

28,135.051 

11,156.21 

16,978.84 

5,647.46 

2,817.84 

2,829.62 

7,903,27 

4,464.86 

3,438,41 

7,508.12 

3,291,22 

4,065.45 

133.10 

18.35' 



1,261, 

1,123. 

29. 

70, 

17. 

20. 

724, 

400, 

1,328, 

1,213, 

115, 

479, 

1,553. 

1,553, 



92.$ 

H 

24j 
62! 

H 

67 _. 

93 

49!. 

91 

24 

67 

97] 

20| 

20' 



4,509.66 

3,036,99 

500.00 

416,00 

556.67 



Trans- 
ferred to 

High 
Schools. 



$ 2,250,00 
2,250.00 



Paid to 

City 
Schools. 



Balance 

or 
Deficit. 



$ 5,256,20 
5,256.20 



53,83 1,000,00 

500,00 

298,50 3,142.01! 2,059,00 

i 
23,72, 3,142.01 2,059.00 

; 

274.78! 



135.24 
3,224.81 

224,81 
3,000,00 



1,499.02 
1,175.00 
1,175.00 



5,194,00 
5,194.00 



925.24 192.15 1,000.00 1,250,00 

I 
925.241 192.15! 1,000,00; 1,2.50, 00 



1,083. 

445. 
4,844. 
3,092. 
1,752, 
1,009, 

663, 

346. 

991. 

795. 

195. 

984. 

710. 

225. 

44. 

4. 



600.00 1,000.00 



3,295.88i 2,250,00 18,610.57 

I 

265.43 2, 250. 00' 18,610.57 
3,030.45 

1,695.63 



1,122.94 
285.00 
837.94 

4,504,52' 



1,695.63 



533.00 
533.00 



4,504.52 
701.50 



500,00 
500.00 



501.50;. 



200.00 



5,192.00 
5,192.00 



3,086.86 
3,086,86 



•S 520.57 

435.42 

334.69 

*565.75 

29.13 

287.08' 

1,765.28 

27,74 

1,870,81 

1,870.81 



1,944.00 

4,036.02 

3,334.35 

*622.07 

1,323.74 

4,608.36 

3,468,36 

585.00 

555,00 

3,177.68 

5,803.50 

*1,596.52 

*546.67 

*1,049.85 

412.60 

*190.61 

603,21 

2,312.51 

2,312,45 

.06 

572.92 

27.52 

70.04 

25.61 

449.75 



♦Deficit. 

f'Rural," as here used, refers to all public school expenditures made by the county treasurer, in distinction 
from report of treasurers of city schools. 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



145 



Table IV. Summaby of Expenditures — Continued. 



Total 
Fund. 



Trans- 



Spent for Spent for Bor- 

Total Teaching' Build- Spent for' rowed pp^'t'',*: ' Paid to 
Expendi- and ings and Admin- Money Hieh ^^^^ 

tures. Super- Sup- istration. Repaid, ! ggjiQQig ' Schools. 



vision. 



plies. 



Balance 

or 
Deficit. 



etc. 



Camden $ 7,550.37 

Carteret 17,893.77 

CasweU 13,239.57 

Catawba 44,695.57 

Rural 30,499.92 

Hickory 7,810.45 

Newton 6,385.20 

Chatham 23,710.57 

Cherokee 26,883.36 

Rural 17,263.37 

Andrews 6,838.04 

Murphy 2,781.95 

Chowan 18,862.99 

Rural 12,467.64 

Edenton 6,395.35 

Clay 3,909.88 

Cleveland 56,159.80 

Rural 32,802.55 

Shelby 5,285.00 

Kngs Mountain 18,072.25, 

Columbus 43.704.88; 

Craven 55,602.68' 

Rural 33,447.57! 

New Bern 22,155.11 

Cumberland 51,754.00 

Rural 34,716.86 

Fayetteville 14,876.42 

Hope Mills 2,160.72 

Currituck 15,579.94 

Dare 8,111.44 

Davidson i 43,702.43 

Rural 26,928.57 

Lexington 8,675.80 

Thomasville ... 8,098.06 

Davie 13,723.55 

♦Deficit. 

Part 11—10 



8,341.72$ 

14,150.33 

12,763.20 

40,376.53 

29,064.92 

6,218.16 

5,093.45i 

23,414.28; 

26,174.65 

17,168.641 

6,874.36j 

2,131.65 

18,071. 49| 

12,339.57: 

5,731.92 

3,909. 88i 

56,096.54^ 

32,594.59; 

5,299.70 

18,202.251 

42,561.42| 

56,398.79' 

33,272.631 

23,126.16! 

49,026.041 

33,966.311 

13,028.72 

2,031.01 

14,176.91 

7,019.47' 

37,288.60 

24,428.80 

7,361.52 

5,498.28 

12,061,04 



5,118.811$ 1,605.29$ 

10,302.64 2,499.30 

9,754.54 1,767.05 

24,948.74 6,976.33 

16,798.74: 4,261.09 

5,311.25, 906.91. 

2,838.75| 1,808.33, 

16,697.521 3,535.01 

19,045.191 3,332.23 

11,771.191 2,155.58 

5,274.0o! 1,045.00 

2,000.00: 131.65. 

10,965.32j 4,662.38; 

6,240. 32i 3,892.39 

4,725.00, 769.99 

2,348.00 460.90 



362.231 505.39$ 750.00.$... i 

348,39: .... 1,000.00' 

741.61; 500.00. 

1,169.65 540.99' 1,062.65! 5,678.17 

1,123.28 140.99' 1,062. 65^ 5,678.17 



46.37 

1,021.80 

952.39 

942,03 

10.36 



400.00 

659.95; 1,500.00. 

594. 84i 2,250.00. 

49.84: 2,250.00. 

545.00 . 



1,163.79 1,280,00 

926.86: ; 1,280.00 

236. 93| I 



*791.35 

3,743.44 

476.37 

4,319.04 

1,435.00 

1,592.29 

1,291.75 

296.29 

708.71 

94.73 

*36.32 

650.30 

791.50 

128.07 

663.43 



28,334.39 

20,599.39 

4,840.00 

2,895.00 

30,726.27 



22,396.69 

6,746.69 

354.00 

15,296.00| 
5,734.36' 



28,736.55! 18,253.87 

14,180.15! 10,088.71| 

14,556. 40! 8,165.16! 

I 

31,134.23: 8,435.98 

21,768. 06j 5,813.95 

8,289.9ll 1,838.48 

1,076.26' 783.55 

9,468.50 2,347.69 

5,823.25 796.00 

24,675.22 5,547.94 

14,997.57 3,269.42 

5,570.00 1,283.52. 

4,107.65 995.00 

8,632.75 1,472,20 



146.20 
1,307.34 
1,190.39 

105.70 

11.25 

1,398.82 

1,624.63 



204.78: 750.00] . 

333,12 540. OO! 3,185.00 
333.12' 540.00' 3,185.00 



2,501.971 2,200.00 



5,533.74; 



1 2,250.00 

1,220.03L... ! 2,250.00| 5,533.741 

404.60 ...J.... ' 



1,843.73 2,732.10 

1,122.20! 382.10 

550.33 2,350.00 

171.20 

1,476.98 365.19 

400.22... 

1,512.29 508.00 

1,116.66 

508.00 

395.63 

706.09 



1,680.00 3,200.00 
I.68O.OO! 3,200.00' 



518.551. 



1,250.00 3,795.15, 
1,250.00 3,795.15 



1,250.00... 



63.26 

207.96 

*14.70 

*130.00 

1,143.46 

*796.11 

174.94 

*971.05 

2,727.96 

750.55 

1,847.70 

129.71 

1,403.03 

1.091.97 

6,413.83 

2,499.77 

1,314.28 

2,599.78 

1.662.51 



146 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



Table IV. Summaby of Expenditures — Continued. 



Total 

Fund. 



I 

I Total 
Expendi- 
tures. 



Duplin 

Durham 

Rural 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Rural 

Tarboro 

Forsyth 

Rural 

Winston 

Kernersville... 

Franklin 

Rural 

Franklinton 

Louisburg 

Youngsville 

Gaston 

Rural 

Gastonia 

Cherry ville 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford 

Rural 

Greensboro, 

High Point 

Guilford College 

Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck . 

Weldon 

Enfield 

Roanoke Rapidsl 

♦Deficit. 



29,783. 54j$ 

141,498.791 

58,082.04' 

83,416.75 

40,861.54 

28,304.12 

12,557.421 

80,228.05! 

48,703.14: 

27,670.00 

3,854.91 

38,596.96; 

23,740. 6o' 

4,178.46 

7,824.55 

2,853.35 

55,731.99 

42,376.72 

10,577.47 

2,777.80 

16,158.38 

4,606.65 

41,504.81' 

32,845.84; 

8,658.97 

12,418.67 

154,614.66 

97,226.43 

31,9.57.40 

24,309.82 

1,120.95 

69,541.08 

43,198.05 

6,473.94 

6,633.62 

7,421.80| 

5,813.67- 



25,734.85 
-135,392.25 
52,115.52 
83,276.73 
42,383.01 
30,827.67 
11,555.34 
77,988.231 
47,547.79: 
27,670.00 

2,770.44 
35,275.121 
21,562.99 

4,883.55| 

6,442.15' 

2,386.43 
5V,987.92i 
44,832.30 
10,457.12 

2,698.50 
15,589.86^ 

3,962.591 
48,497.81 
40.722.32 

7,775.49 
11,422.19 
137,272.90 
83,328.38' 
31,373.16 
21,450.41^ 

1,120.95 
53,281.41 

30,600.47 

I 
6,267.60 

6,634.84 

4,603.47 

5,175.03 



Spent for ! Spent for' ' Bor- ' t ' ' 

Teaching Build- Spent for rowed etrrJ^i,^ ^aicj to Balance 
and lings and Admin-: Money . irfcrt. City or 

Super- Sup- istration. Repaid. I oic "'}„ Schools. , Deficit. 

vision. plies, i , etc. I '^''^^""^^■ 



20,095. 16i$ 3,035.68 

68,340.66' 33,224.79! 

23,233.4r 24,643.09 

45,107.251 8,581.70 

27,928.53 6,774.87 

19,907.53 4,821.58' 

8,021.00J 1,953.29 

49,512.25; 10,626.25 

24,037.25 6,277.95 

23,750.00 3,820 00 

1,725.00 528.30 

24,116.25; 5,598.98 

14,564.25 2,340.19 

3,427.00 1,028.98 

4,260.00 1,932.69 

1,865.00 297.12 

39,496.41 9,855.11 

27,985.76 8,360.14 

9,030.00 1,427.12 

2,480.65 67.85 

8,615. 16j 3,367.20 

3,439.90, 150.51 

25,591.25! 12,873,67 

19,991.25; 12,273.12 

5,600.00 600.55 

7,666.65 2,786.89 

79,951.24 31,162,67 

I 

38,154.56' 22,422.46 

26,734.19 4,111.34! 

14,012.49! 4,557.92 

1,05Q.00 70.95 

35,034.74 7,242.53 

18,776.12 2,904.62; 

5,005.00 762,60 

4,598.62 1,376.22, 

3,415.00 539.95 

3,240.00 1,659.141 



929.01 

3,243.551 

1,814.02 

1,429.53' 

2,279.61, 

1,698.56; 

581,051 

839,58 

722.44! 

100,00 

17.14 

1,785. 70; 

1,294.55' 

117,38 

249.46, 

124.31, 

1,855.01 

1,855.01 



5 ....« 1,675.00$ |S 4,048.69 

28,258.25! 2,325.00:. .[ 6.106.54 

100.00 2,325.00 I 5,966.52 

28,158.25 ' 140.02 

1,000.00 1,400.00 3,000.00 *1.521.47 

1,400.00 3,000.00, *2,523.55 

1,000,00 ,..! I 1.002.08 

500,00 2,800.15 13,710.00 2,239.82 
2,800.15 13,710.00 1,155.35 



500.00 

410.19 1,000,00 2,364.00 
1,000,00 2,364.00 
310.19 

100,00 

156.39 2,625.00 4,000.00 
6.39 2,625.00 4,000,00 



569.67: 

372.18. 
1,825.06! 
1,725.12 
99.94 

458.65 
2,504.99' 
1,457.36 

527.63 



150.00 

1,987.23 1,050.60 



3,957.83 2,250.00 2,000.00i 
2,482.83 2,250.00 2,000.00 

1,475.00 

510.00 

2,988.11 3,703,89 16,962.00 
628,11 3,703.89 16,962.00 



1.084.47 

3,321.84 

2,177.61 

*705.09 

1,382.40 

466.92 

*2,255.93 

*2.455.58 

120.35 

79.30 

568.52 

644.06 

*6,993.00 

*7,876.48 

883.48 

996.48 

17,341.76 

13,898.05 

584.30 



520.00 


2,360.00 _ 




2,859.41 


1,779.36 


2,150.03 


1,500,00 


5,574.75 16,259.67 


1,194,95 


6.50.03 


1,500.00 


5,574.75 12,597.58 




500.00. 
500.00. 
500.00 . 




206.34 


160.00 
148.52 




*1,22 




' 2,818,33 


275.89 


■ 


638.64 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



147 



Table IV. Summary of Expenditures — Continued. 



Total 
Fund. 



Total 
Expendi- 
tures. 



Spent for Spent for, Bor- i rp I | 

Teaching Build- Spent for rowed fprVpH tnl ^''^id to ! Balance 
^"'i ingsand Admin- Money Ir.vh City ' "i- 



and 
Super- 
vision. 



Sup- listration. Repaid, ; q„>,l?J, 
plies. I etc. , ^c^oo^s. 



Harnett 1 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville 

Henderson ; 

Rural ! 

Hendersonville- 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Iredell i 

Rural 

Mooresville ! 

Statesville 

I 
Jackson 

Johnston ; 

Rural 

Selma 

Smithfield 

j 
Jones ' 

Lee 

Rural 

Sanf ord 

Lenoir 

Rural 

Kinston 

LaGrange 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincolnton 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Rural 

Williamston 

Robersonville _ . 

*Deficit. 



28,938. 455 
22,892.34 

6,046.11 

I 

38, 570. 01 [ 
32,340.71 

6,229.30 
25,836.29' 
21.158.61 

4,677.68 
17,212.77 
17, 009. 41 1 
60,125.17 
35,958.96, 

8,191.01 
15,975. 20| 
19,906.15' 
59,740.79 
49,118.53 

5,233.58 

5,388.68 
14,793.58 
20,016.91 
14,287.66 

5.729.25 
37,496.07 
18,756.77 
14,284.31 

4,454.99 
26,004.90 
19,999.50 

6,005.40 
14,. 381. 88 
31,118.58 
43,482.38 
35,832.71 

4,431.62 

3,218.05 



25,844.49'S 
21,762.48: 

4,082.01j 
24,372.99, 
17,675.69: 

6,697.30 
22,939.59 
18,399.83 

4,539.V6 
14.206.86 
10,219.71 
54,074.78 
34,995.64 

6,238.85 
12,840.29 
19,892.81 
48,527.86 
40,975.72 

3,647.06 

3,905.08 

14,044. 41| 

18,979.22^ 

i 

13,265.4r 

5,713.81 
33,511.28 
16,640.92! 
13,073.31 

3,797.05' 
23,567.47, 
17,788.35! 

5,779.121 
15,796.67] 
17,393.98: 
23,756.08 
17,821.801 

3,593.681 

2,340.60 



18,527.371$ 3,918.09|li 

14,892.87' 3,498.041 

3,634.50 420.05, 

18,358.00' 1,881.95 

13,130.00' 412.65' 

5,228.00 1,4G9.30|. 

I 

15,528.221 3,931.891 

11,839.22 3,097.09! 

i ■ ! 

3,689.00 834.80 

8,973.30 1,810.76 

6,922.71, 2,235.37; 

33,357.551 11,120.24 

20,413.07| 6,896.45 

5,273.23: 561.62 

7,671.25, 3,662.17 

12,"862.11i 5,275.72 

35,185.61^ 6,083.82 

28,650.61! 5,313.72 

3,340.00 295. 06j 

3,195.00 475.04' 

9,241.34: 3,306.53 

11,897.03; 3,690.601 

8,017.03 2,606.79 

3,880.00| l,083.8i: 

22,559.661 4,360.34j 

9,494.66' 1,446.40' 

I , 

11, 185. 00' 1,786. 31' 

1,880.00 1,127.63 

16,843.02 3,505.19 

11,724.92 2,865.09 

5,118.10 640.10 

10,435.09 3,245.00 

12,080.16 3,464.49 

15,723.59 3,686.71 

11,138.63 2,476.57 

2,784.96 734.44 

1,800.00 475.70 



829.32j$ 1$ 1,329.71 

801.86' ! 1,329.71 

27.46, 

509.21 1,748.83 

509.21' -.J 1,748.83 



1,364.28 146. 23| 500.00 

1.348.32 146.231 500.00 
15.96' -J 

1,063.33, 409. 47J 1,950.00 

433.16; 128. 47| 500.00 
I 
1,937.031 1,722.11 1,200.00 

1,363.63; 384. 64| 1,200.00 

404. OOi 

169.' 40' 1,337.47 

948.98! ! 806.00 

1,891.37, 177. 06| 2,550.00 

1.789.33 32.06! 2,550.00 
. 12.00 I 

90.04 145.00 

546.54 _..| 950.00 

645.70 700.00! 624.70 
595.70 624.70 

50.00' 700.00.._ 

870.23 636.05 900.00 

614.86 1 900.00 

102.00' ' 

153.37 636.05 

665.93 48.27 1,045.06 

645.01 48.27 1,045.06, 1,460.001 2,211.15 

20.92 _!.... ', 226.28 

841.58;. 1,275.00, *1,414.79 

849.33,....". 1,000.001 13,724.60 

1,090.78 1,500.00! 1,755.00 19,726.30 

951. 60| 1,500.00 1,755.00! 18,010.91 

74.28! I 837.94 

64.90 1... \ 877.45 



— -., or 

Schools. Deficit. 



$ 1,240.00'$ 3,093.96 
1,240.00| 1,129.86 
1,964.10 

1.875.00 14,197.02 

1.875.001 14,665.02 

...i *468.00 

1,468.971 2,896.70 
1,468.97' 2,758.78 

137.92 

3,005.91 

6,78*70 

4,737.85: 6,050.39 
4,737.851 963.32 
._ 1,952.16 

3,134.91 
13.34 



2,640.00 11,212.93 

2,640.00: 8,142.81 

.! 1,586.52 

' 1,483.60 

749.17 

1,421.191 1,037.69 

1,421.19| 1,022.25 

.„ ..' 15.44 

4,185.00 3,984.79 

4, 185.00' 2,115.85 

1,211.00 

! 657.94 

1,460.00 2,437.43 



148 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



Table IV. Summary of Expenditures — Continued. 



Total 
Fund. 



' Spent for Spent for 
Total i Teaching Build- 
Expendi- and ingsand 

tures. Super- , Sup- 

vision. ' plies. 



McDowell $ 37,108.08; 

Rural 30,289.32 

Marion j 6,818.76 

Mecklenburg i 155,075.261 

Rural i 70,245.45' 

Charlotte i 84,829.81: 

I i 

Mitchell 13,326.15 

Montgomery ! 16,564.97i 

Rural 14,183.88 

Troy 2,381.09 

Moore 44,149.81 

Rural 27,908. lOi 

i 

Carthage i 4,743.19: 

! 

Southern Pines- : 11,498. 52i 

Nash j 65,527.891 

Rural J 44,306.29 

Rocky Mount . . | 21 , 221 . 60 

New Hanover . . . : 59 . 922 . 79 1 

Rural ' 19,929.85! 

Wilmington 39,992.94' 

Northampton 24,651.851 

Onslow I 21,274.83! 

Orange j 18,794.96| 

Pamlico ' 15,894.64! 

Pasquotank ] 96,060.68: 

Rural -.' 16,406.19; 

Elizabeth City .| 79,654.49| 

Pender ' 23,230.59' 

i I 

Perquimans ; 16,670.40; 

Rural 11,012.57 

Hertford | 5,657.83 

Person ; 20,700.23 

Rural. .-' 14,358.27 

Roxboro 6,341.96 

Pitt : 58,949.79 

Rural ! 47,146.88 

Greenville : 11,802.91 



27,595.001 
21,102.53i 

6,492. 47' 
149,623. 17| 
68,931.43! 
80,691.74: 
13,326.15 
15,852.26 
13,846.38 

2,005.88 
30,396.05 
23,749.32 

3,717.10^ 

2,929.63' 
61,090.49; 
39,945.42; 
21,145.07! 
54,800.40 
14,807.46 
39,992.94 
24,651.85 
18,694.36 
18,254.17 
13,098.30, 
43,921.18' 
16,383.08; 
27,538.10 
19,293.66 
14,610.44 

9,149.18; 

I 

5,461.26 
18,443.56: 
12.594.85 

5,848.71, 
53,694.63! 
41,934.221 

I 

11,760.41! 



16,882,60: 

13,162.60 

3,720.00; 

80,351.03| 

30,262.98; 

50,088.051 

10,687.79| 

10,794.03; 

I 

8,814.03 

1,980.00 
19,962.20 
14,847.20 

2,935.00 

2,180.00 
35,526.68 
21,526.60 
14,000.08 
42,917.55 
14,568.35 
28,349.20 
15,565.89 
13,605.63 
11,659.83 

8,961.341 
20,120.17; 

5, 711.60' 
14,408.57 
12,612.00 

9,538.45 

5,831.95 

3,706.50 
13,837.55, 

9,250.80! 

4,586.75! 
37,307.63' 
29,854.43 

7,453.20 



Bor- 

Spent for rowed 
Admin- Money 



Trans- 



ferred to! 



Paid to 



Balance 
Hieb City or 

istration. Repaid, g^tioois Schools. Deficit. 



etc. 



; 5,261.47 

4,079.62 

1,181.85: 

19,229.31 

7,246.67 

11,982.64! 

110.00 

1,266.27 

1,240.39 

25.88 

4,239.94 

3,220^21! 

782.10; 

237.63 

16,141.77 

9,404.42 

6,737.35 

23,860.37 

12,216.63 

1 

11,643.74 

5,872. 10' 

3,505.28 

2,977. 76| 

2,603.63; 

10,141.841 

1,969.931 

8,171.91 

3,627.03 

3,470.821 

1,716.06 

1,754.76' 

I 

1,199.06 
747.25! 
451.81 

7,578.79! 
5,924.08 
1,654.71 



1,684.18$ 1,526.75$ 1,040.00$ 1,200.00 
1,593.56 26.75 1,040.00; 1,200.00 

90.62 1,500.00 

2,000.00: 26,884.42 
2,000.00; 26,884.42 



2,064.31 



19,094.10 

1,443.261 1,09^.10 

621.05! 18,000.00 

703.52 481.50 

717.63 

717.63....".... 



1,773.37 3,470.54 
1,261.37 3,470.54 



512.00 

1,677.01 1,085.56 
1,552.01; 802.92 

125, 00| 282.64 
1,412.72, 53.50 

1,412.72: 53.50 



1,179.17 500.00 
783.45^ 

1,625.951 957.58 
533.33 

1,239.171 6,500.00 

I 

781.55! 2,000.00 

457.62; 4,500.00 

1,028.84! 700.79 

301.171 

301.17.. 



471.80 805.15 

466.80 

5.00 805.15 

1,594.78 2,663,43 

1,594.78 10.93 

2,652.50 



1,343.34 

2,238.34 835.99 
2,238.341 835.99 



950.00. 
950,00. 



2,375.11; 4,284.36 
2,375.11; 4,284.36 



1,534.69. 

800. OOi. 

1,033,05. 

1,000.00. 



5,920.00 
5,920.00 



1,325.00, 



1,300.00 
1,300.00 



1,030.00 1,100.00 

1,030.00 1,100.00 

2,750.00 1,800.00- 

2,750.00 1,800.00 



9,513.08 
9,186.79 
326.29 
5,452.09 
1,314.02 
4,138.07 



712.71 

337.50 

375.21 

13,753.76 

4,158.78 

1,026.09 

8,568,89 

. 4,437.40 

4,360,87 

76,53 

5,122.39 

5,122.39 



2,580.47 

540.79 

2,796.34 

52,139.50 

23.11 

52,116.39 

3,936.93 

2,059.96 

1,863.39 

196.57 

2,256 67 

1,763.42 

493.25 

5,2.55.16 

5,212.66 

42.50 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



149 



Table IV. Summaky of Expenditures — Continued. 




Polk $ 8,084.49|^ 

Randolph 41,675.19; 

Rural 33,546.12' 



Ashboro 

Randleman . 

Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham 
Hamlet 



4,500.00 
3,629.07 
37,789.56 
22,563.77 
5,586.93 
9,638.86 



Bor- 



Trans- 



Spent for bpent for , , naiis- i r.^,-^ *« 

Teaching Build- Spent for rowed f erred toi ^?;^1*° 
and 
Super- 
vision. 



ings and i Admin- Money 'nigh « 9^^^, 



Sup- 
plies. 



Balance 
or 
ist ration. I Repaid, gdi'ools Schools. | Deficit. 

etc. ' 'I 



6,449.76 

43,560.04 

33,522.14 

5,973.11 

4,064.79 

33,922.31 

18,739.80 

5,586.93 

9,595.58 



$ 4,858.90|$ 792.48 
24,089.76; 12,479.80 
17,499.76 9,643.37 
3,860.00 1,535.10 
2,730.00 1,301.33 
18,899.9o{ 10,139.30 
10,654.90 3,301.88 



500.00 



506.051 2,512.30 
6.05! 2,512.30 



$ .$ 1,634.73 



2,250.00j *1, 884.85 
2,250.00; 23.98 



$ 298.38:$. 

1,722.131 

1,610.661 

78. Ol' 500.00 ---.; ----; 1,473.11 

33.46| - , *435.72 

847.91:.... 2,100.00 1,935.20; 3,867.25 

747.82 2,100.00| 1,935.20] 3,823.97 



4,680.00 906.93 ] 

3,565.00 5,930.49 100.09.. 

Kobeson ; 69,594.99 66,435.12 47,134.91 10,006.03 2,100.31 1,936.43 3,150.00 2,107.44 

Rural t 59,797.91 56,966.46 39,379.31 8,491.17 1,902.11 1,936.43 3,150.00 2.107.44 



Lumberton — 

Maxton 

Rockingham 

Rural 

Reidsville 



43.28 
3,159.87 
2,831.45 

|. *63.75 

! 392.17 

750.00 4,387.00 1,524.06 

750.00 4,387.00 1,266.88 

257.18 



500.00 2,648.70 



5,541.25i 5,605.00 4,980.00 500.00 125.00: 

4,255.83 3,863.66 2,775.60 1,014.86 ' 73.20. '. 

52,259.73 50,735.67 31,180.07 9,538.76' 4,386.14 493.70 

39,954.46 38,687.581 22,683.22 6,665.35; 4,202.01 

12,305.27 12,048.09; 8,496.85; 2,873.4i; 184.13 493.70 

Rowan 1 66,423.40 58,382.97; 41,898.75 5.902.28 1,377.94 360.00 2,250.00 6,594.00 8,040.43 

Rural 53,829.40 45,788.97 29,922.00 5,902.28 1,120.69 2.250.00 6,594.00 8,040.43 

Salisbury 12.594.00 12.594.00 11,976 75 257.25 360.00 

Rutherford 25,759.17 23,110.47 17,106.34 4,413.52 1,087.01 3.60 

Sampson 43,658.13 38,048.92 26,948.82 4,449.45; 2,721.13| 1,349.52; 1,500.00J 1,080.00 5,609.21 

Rural 39,754.53 34,246.08 23.618.82 4,177.17 2,675.57! 1,194.52; 1,500.00! 1,080.00 5,508.45 

3,802.84 3.330.00 272.28 45.56 155.00 ....;.. - 100.76 

12,064.00 30,996.98 802.24..... ; l,500.0o! 1,229.18 2,911.14 

7,715. 25^ 890.05 802.24 , 1,500.00' 1,229.18 480.48 

4,348.75' 30,106.93 .---■ ' ' ' 2,430.66 

12.575.43 3,361.51 853.99 617.97 1,295.00 3,085.08 

9,804.30 2.418.29 853.99 617.97.. 1.295.00 2,403.41 

943.22. 681.67 



3,903.60 
49,503.54 
12,617.20 
36,886.34 



Clinton 

Scotland 

Rural 

Laurinburg - . . 

Stanly 21,788.98 

Rural 17,392.96 

Albemarle 4,396.02 

Stokes 18.178.10 

Surry 38.470.00 



Rural 

Mount Airy.-. 

Swain 

Transylvania - . . 



30.334.30 

8,135.70 

13,872.06 

21,192.27 



46,592.40 
12,136.72: 
34,455.68| 
18,703.90 
14,989.55 

i 

3,714.351 



2,771.13 



17,514.27; 12,250.78 3.177.65 

35,152.29| 22,761.39 6,820.53 

28,448.25^ 16,953.89 5.952.07 

6,704.04 5,807.50 868.46 

13,306.53 8,067.77 1.866.50 

15,208.61! 7,650.23 5,690.66: 



2.46 1.088.07. 



663.83 



995.31 

879. 62' 265.75: 2.625.00 1.800.00; 3.317.71 

851.54* 265.75 2,625.00 1,800.00 1,886.05 

28.08 - 1.431.66 

507.96 1,364.30 1,500.00 .' 565.53 

815.50 52.22: 1,000.00 ' 5.983.66 



* Deficit. 



150 



EXPE^-DITUEES, 1909-'10. 



Table IV. Summary of Expenditures — Continued. 



Total 
Fund. 



Total 
Expendi- 
tures. 



Spent for Spent for 

Teaching Build- (Spent for 
and ings and Admin- 
Super- Sup- istration. 
vision. plies. 



Trans- 



rowed , wtd ^n Paid to ' Balance 
Money ^^nfErv, ^ity or 

Repaid, , schools Schools. , Deficit. 



Tyrrell 

Union 

Rural 35,275.94 

Monroe ! 12,005.15 



$ 5,505.59$ 5,216.74$ 4,561.011$ 409.03$ 211.46 

47,281.09' 45,073.78 33,695.55| 3,187.53 1,430.17 

26,115.551 2,134.73 1,416.36 



Vance 

Rural 

Henderson- 
Wake 

Rural: 

Raleigh — 

Warren 

Washington. 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth _ 
Watauga 



33,983.34 
20,777.69; 
13,205.65 



33,068.64 
12,005.15 
33,296.54 
19,589.74 
13,706.80 



161,484.72; 152,320.82 
91,974.24: 88,249.84 
69,510.48! 64,070.98 



26,030.63i 

16,569.79' 

10,964.37 

1,676.39 

3,929.03 

I 

12,316.06 



Wayne , 74,884.90 

41,481.84 

20,508.38 

7,220.74: 

5,673.94 



Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive. - 

Fremont 

Wilkes 

Rural 

N. Wilkesboro 

Wilson 

Rural 

Wilson City... 

Lucama 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

North Carolina . 



24,077.86 
14,159.45 
8,985.01 
1,585.70 
3,588.74 
9,970.46 
70,470.37 

39,311.86 

I 

20,861.19 
6,204.49 
4,092.83 



35,825.17: 34,845.21 

31,084.13! 30,805.78 

4,741.04i 4,039.43 

80,636.90' 63,174.19 

48,691.38^ 37,081.38 

23,190.68 23,112.81 

8,754.84 2,980.00 

13,536.87^ 12,661.33 

8,991.51 8,710.35 



7,580.00 1,052.80 

19,575.77, 2,665.64 

9,448.47| 1,121.98 

10,127.30 1,543.66 



70,230.14 



38,603.52 



32,908.13! 19,329.19 

37,322.01 19,274.33 

15,295.35! 4,506.87 

9, 864. 50! 969.02 



5,487.00 516.73 

1,175.00 96.05 

3,202.50; 356.24 

9,066.43 547.99 
39,927. 50' 11,816.251 2,434.27 
17,380. 13| 5,982.72 1,820.51 



13.81 

1,123.80 

816.81 

306.99 

9,010.05 

6,035.41 

2,974.64 

1,185.64 

425.93 

331.28 

64.65 

30.00 

356.04 



35.24$ $ 1$ 288.85 

3,360.54 1,000.00 2,400.00' 2,207.50 

2.00! 1,000.00 2,400.00 2. 207. .30 

3,358.54 - 



2,725.33 

996.48 

1,728.85 

14,500.00 

10,000.00 

4,500.00 

1,590.00 

250.00 



250.00 



16,248.62 4,107.81 



504.76 
84.00 
25.00 
1,534.82 
1,473.14 
61. 



3,478.75 477.89 

2.820.00 1,247.83 
26,323.381 6,309.66 
22,643.38 6,011.91 

3.680.001 297.75 
40,280.121 9,079.15! 1,921.92 
24,584.11 4,390.69 
14,591.01 2,813.46 

1,105.00 1,875.00 

9,851.92 1,424,96 468.45. 

6,866.00 1,034.93 809.42. 



8,163.85 
6,000.00 



2,163.85 



5,600.00 

1,813.58: 

108.34' 5,600.00 



1,506.00 5,700.00 686.80 

1,506.00 5,700.00 1,187.95 

...I *501.15 

4,782.07: 15,195.04[ 9,163.90 

4,782. 07i 15,195.04: 3,724.40 

.J 5,439.50 

1,500.00.... 1,952.77 

1,000.00| 1,650. 00' 2,410.34 

1,000.00 1,650.00' 1,979.36 

90.69 

'■ 340.29 

! 2,345.00 

1,710.25 6,418.25 4,414.53 

I 

1,710.25 6,418.25! 2,169.98 

...... *352.Si 



677.35: 
677.35 



3,788,321.37 3,416,696.81 

! 
Rural-. 12,615,408.78 2,364,441.81 

I 
City ,1,172,912.591,052,255.00 



2,122,605.76 667,695.92 

1,433,650.78,424,442.62 

688,954.98 243,253.30 



916.00 



1,016.25 

1,581.11 

979.96 

278.35 

! 701.61 

6,293.00 17,462.71 
6,293.00 11,610.00 

77. S7 

5,774.84 

875 . 54 

281.16 



124,237.26154,486.91 

107,037. 59j 51,639.86 

17,199.67102,847.05 



123,368.39 237,746.31371,624.56 
123,368.39 237,746.31250,966.97 
120,657.59 



♦Deficit. 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



151 



TABLE V. SPENT FOR TEACHING AND SUPERVISION, 1909-'10. 

This table shows the amount of money expended for teaching and supervi- 
sion, and a comparison with tlie total amount spent for schools. 

Summary of Tale Y and Comparison with 1908-'09. 



All expenditures, 1909-'10 

All expenditures, 190S-'09 .- 

For supervision (superintendents) , 1909-' 10 

For supervision (superintendents) , 1908-'09 

Increase 

Wiiite teacliers, 1909-'10 

Wliite teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

Colored teacliers, 1909-10 

Colored teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

Total spent for teaching and supervision, 1909-10 

Total spent for teaching and supervision, 1908-09 

Increase 

Percentage spent for teaching and supervision, 1909-10 
Percentage spent for teaching and supervision, 1908-09 

Increase 

Percentage spent for supervision alone, 1909-10 

Percentage spent for supervision alone, 1908-09 

Increase 

Average salary of superintendents, 1909-10 

Average salary of superintendents, 1908-'09 

Increase. 



Rural. 



$2,126,695.50 
2,029,023.77 
78,071.75 
71,910.32 
6,161.43 
1,126,059.83 
1,037,442.78 
88,617.05 
229,519.20 
227,512.98 
2,006.22 
1,433,650.78 
1,336,866.08 
96,784.70 
67.4 
65.9 
1.5 
3.7 
3.5 
.2 
$ 796.65 
733.77 
62.88 



City. 



$1,052,255.00 
1,040,236.59 
93,380.74 
94.993.57 
*1,612.83 
494,593.13 
449,555.48 
45,037.65 
100,981.11 
93,521.47 
7,459.64 
688,954.98 
638,070.52 
50,884.41 
65.5 
61. 3" 
4.2 
8.9 
9.1 
* 2 

$ 1,026.16 

1,091.88 

*65.72 



North 
Carolina. 



; 3,178,950.50 
3,069,260.30 
171,452.49 
166,903.89 
4,548.60 
1,620,652.96 
1,486,998.26 
133,654.70 
330.500.31 
321,034.45 
9,465.86 
2,122,605.76 
1,974,936.60 
147,669.16 
67.1 
64.3 
2.8 
5.4 
5.4 

5 907.16 

902.18 

4.98 



♦Decrease. 



152 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



Table V. Spent fok Teaching and Supervision — Continued. 



Superin- 
tendents. 



White 
Teachers. 



Colored 
Teachers. 



Total for 
Teaching and 
Supervision. 



Alamance { $ 4,930.00 

Rural --i 1,200.00 

Burlington 1 , 500 . 00 

Graham 1 ,200 . 00 

Haw River 550.00 

Mebane ...[ 480. 00 

Alexander 507.00 

Alleghany 314.00 

Anson 1 ,737. 10 

Rural 487.10 

Wadesboro 1,250.00 i 

Ashe 400.00 j 

Beaufort 3,337.99 \ 

Rural 1,037.99 { 

Washington 1,500.00 

Belhaven 800.00 

Bertie 2.240.00 i 

Rural 720.00 

Windsor 800.00 I 

Aulander 720.00 

Bladen 600.00 i 

Brunswick 475.00 

Buncombe 3,765.00 '• 

Rural 1,565.00 

Asheville . i 2 , 200 . 00 

Burke 1,900.00 

Rural 900.00 

Morganton 1,000.00 i 

Cabarrus .- 2,600.00 

Rural 1,100.00 

Concord 1 ,500.00 

Caldwell 2 , 095 . 00 

Rural 800.00 

Lenoir -.. 1,200.00 

Granite 95.00 

Rhodhiss 

Camden 228. 00 

Carteret . 300.00 



21.163.49 

8,649.05 

6,979.19 

3,155.25 

1,400.00 

980,00 

8,329.16 

6,010.69 

11,079.11 

8,079.11 

3,000.00 

11,265.25 

21,638.28 

11,505.28 

8,772.00 

1,361.00 

11,953.55 

9,993.55 

1,220.00 

740.00 

9,364.74 

6,275.06 

62,097.18 

26,185.50 

35,911.68 

12,592.84 

8,714.09 

3,878.75 

20,868.95 

11,758.50 

9,110.45 

16,153.65 

9,653.15 

5,098.00 

882.50 

520.00 

3,895.33 

9,534.89 



3,866.86 

2,399.66 

450.00 

446.75 

130.45 

440.00- 

663.20 

264.00 

4,216.00 

3,676.00 

540.00 

483.62 

5,630.86 

3,408.36 

1,742.50 

480.00 

5,655.22 

5,205.22 

450.00 



3,005.85 

2,494.41 

7,727.13 

1,383.75 

6,343.38 

1,578.18 

918.18 

660.00 

3,408.92 

1,890.17 

1,518.75 

1,568.50 

1,162.75 

405.75 



995.48 
467.75 



29,960.35 

12,248.71 

8,929.19 

4.802.00 

2,080.45 

1,900.00 

9,499.36 

6,588.69 

17,032.21 

12,242.21 

4,790.00 

12,148.87 

30,607.13 

15,951.63 

12,014.50 

2,641.00 

19,848.77 

15,918.77 

2,470.00 

1,460.00 

12, 970.. 59 

9,244.47 

73,589.31 

29,134.25 

44,455.06 

16,071.02 

10,532.27 

5,538.75 

26,877.87 

14,748.67 

12,129.20 

19,817.15 

11,615.90 

6,703.75 

977.50 

520.00 

5,118r81 

10,302.64 



EXPENDITUKES, 1909-'10. 



153 



Table V. Spent for Teaching and Supervision — Continued. 



Caswell 

Catawba ,.. 

Rural 

Hickory 

Newton 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Rural 

Andrews 

Murphy 

Chowan 

Rural 

Edenton 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Rural 

Shelby 

Kings Mountain, 

Columbus .. 

Craven 

Rural 

New Bern 

Cumberland 

Rural 

Fayetteville_ . _ - , 

Hope Mills 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Rural 

I^xington 

Thomasville 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Rural 

Durham 



Superin- 
tendents. 



700.00 
2,471.25 

600.00 
1,050.00 

821.25 

799.00 
1,925.65 

345.65 

900.00 

680.00 
1,923.00 

573.00 
1,350.00 

200.00 
2,050.00 
1,250.00 

800.00 



White 
Teachers. 



Colored 
Teachers. 



946.00 
2,700.00 
1,200.00 
1,500.00 
2,700.00 
1,200.00 
1,500.00 



234.50 

314.75 

3,230.00 

1,150.00 

1,080.00 

1,000.00 

405.00 

528.00 

4,330.00 

1,930.00 

2,400.00 



Total for 
Teaching and 
Supervision. 



5,669.50 


$ 3,385,04 


$ 9,754.54 


20,242.64 


2,234.85 


24,948.74 


14,872.64 


1,326.10 


16,798.74 


3,612.50 


648.75 


5,311.25 


1,757.50 


260.00 


2,838,75 


12,277.87 


3,620,65 


16,697.52 


16,719.54 


400.00 


19,045.19 


11,125.54 


300.00 


11,771.19 


4,274.00 


100,00 


5,274,00 


1,320.00 




2,000,00 


6,541.72 


2,500.60 


10,965,32 


3,391.72 


2,275,60 


6,240.32 


3,150,00 


225.00 


4,725.00 


2,064.00 


84.00 


2,348,00 


23,914.46 


2,369.93 


28,334.39 


17,744.46 


1,604.93 


20,599.39 


3,400.00 


640,00 


4,840.00 


2,770.00 


125,00 


2,895,00 


25,620.11 


4,160.16 


30,726,27 


20,480.05 


5,556.50 


28,736.55 


9,568.65 


3,411.50 


14,180.15 


10,911.40 


2,145.00 


14,556.40 


22,752.82 


5,681.41 


31,134,23 


16,422.54 


4,145.52 


21,768.06 


5,254.02 


1,535.89 


8,289.91 


1,076.26 




1,076.26 


7,225.45 


2,008.55 


9,468.50 


6,148.50 


360.00 


5,823.25 


18,810.77 


2,634.45 


24,675,22 


12,353,12 


1,494,45 


14,997,57 


3,930,00 


560,00 


5,570,00 


2,527.65 


580,00 


4,107.65 


6,896.77 


1,330.98 


8,632.75 


15,554.68 


4,012.48 


20,095.16 


53,485,85 


10,524.81 


68,340.66 


19,278.60 


2,024.81 


23,233.41 


34,207,25 


8,500.00 


45,107.25 



154 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



Table V. Spent fok Teaching and Supervision — Continued. 



Superin- 
tendents. 



White 
Teachers. 



Teachers Teaching and 
leacuers. Supervision. 



Edgecombe 

Rural 

Tarboro 

Forsyth 

Rural 

Winston 

Kernersville 

Franklin 

Rural 

Franklinton 

Louisburg 

Youngsville 

Gaston 

Rural 

Gastonia 

Cherry ville 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford 

Rural 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Guilford College _ 

Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck___ 

Weldon 

Enfield 

Roanoke Rapids. 

Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn 



1,475.00 ? 
1,000.00 

475.00 
3,522.00 
1,092.00 
1,750.00 

680.00 
4,400.00 

900.00 
1,550.00 
1,200.00 : 

750.00 
3,500.00 
1,200.00 
1,500.00 

800.00 

648.00 

348.00 
2,245.00 
1,245.00 
1,000.00 

,543.00 
5,794.57 ' 
2,383.33 
1,800.00 
1,611.24 



5,391.24 

1,216.24 

1,000 00 

1,375.00 

800.00 

1,000.00 

1,547.00 

982.00 

565 00 



21,014.38 


$ 5,439.15 


14,948.38 


3,959.15 


6,066.00 


1,480.00 


38,447.08 


7,543.17 


19,647.08 


3,298.17 


18,000.00 


4,000.00 


800.00 


245.00 


14,803.50 


4,912.75 


10,323.50 


3,340.75 


1,480.00 


397.00 


2,160.00 


900.00 


840.00 


275.00 


33,050.05 


2,946.36 


24,839.40 


.1,946.36 


6,530.00 


1,000.00 


1,680.65 




5,485.50 


2,481.66 


3,091.90 




18,166.00 


5,180.25 


14,601.00 


4,145.25 


3,565.00 


1,035.00 


5,183.60 


1,940.05 


63,673.37 


10,483.30 


31,371.03 


4,400.20 


21,701.09 


3,233.10 


9,551.25 j 


2,850.00 


1,050 00 ! 




20,822.54 


8,820.96 


10,585.12 


6,974.76 


3,555.00 


450.00 


2,602.42 


621.20 


2,080.00 1 


5.35.00 


2,000.00 


240.00 


15,136.16 


1,844.21 


12,066.66 


1,844.21 


3.069.50 : 





27,928.53 

19,907.53 

8,021.00 

49,512.25 

24,037.25 

23,750,00 

1,725.00 

24,116.25 

14,564.25 

3,427.00 

4,260.00 

1,865.00 

39,496.41 

27.985.76 

9,030.00 

2,480.65 

8,615.16 

3,439.90 

25,591.25 

19,991.25 

5,600.00 

7,666.65 

79,951.24 

38.1.54.56 

26,734.19 

14,012.49 

1,050.00 

35,034.74 

18, -776. 12 

5,005.00 

4,598.67 

3,415.00 

3,240.00 

18.527.37 

14,892.87 

3,634.50 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



155 



Table V. Spent for Teaching and Supervision — Continued. 



Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville . 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville 

St atesvillc 

Jackson . . . . 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selraa 

Smithfleld ■_ 

Jones 



Lee 

Rural 

Sanf ord 

Lenoir 

Rural 

Klnston 

LaGrange 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincolnton 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Rural 

Williamston.. 
RobersonvUle . 

McDowell 

Rural 

Marion 



Superin- 
tendents. 




nnlnrpd ' Total for 
Teachers Teaching and 
ieacners. supervision. 



1,600.00 


$ 16,030.00 


$ 728.00 


$ 18,3.58.00 


600.00 


12,530.00 




13,130.00 


1,000.00 


3,500.00 


728.00 


5,228,00 


1,680.00 


12,417.18 


1,431.04 


15,528.22 


680 00 


10,208.18 


951.04 


11,839.22 


1,000.00 


2,209.00 


480.00 


3,689.00 


750.00 


5,146.60 


3,076.70 


8,973.30 


325.00 


5,032.62 


1,565.09 


6,922.71 


3,482.35 


25,526.36 


4,348.84 


33,357.55 


982.35 


16,441.88 


2,988.84 


20,413.07 


1,000.00 


3,793.23 


480.00 


5,273.23 


1,500.00 


5,291.25 


880.00 


7,671.25 


503.50 


11,693.61 


665.00 


12,862.11 


3,100.00 


27,355.08 


4,730.53 


35,185.61 


1,100.00 


23,735.08 


3,815.53 


28,650.61 


1,000.00 


1,890.00 


4.50.00 


3,340.00 


1,000.00 


1,730.00 


405 00 


3,195.00 


348.50 


6,515.^5 


2,377.59 


9,241.34 


1,729.78 


8,289.70 


1,877.55 


11,897.03 


529.78 


5,609.70 


1,877.55 


8,017.03 


1,200 00 


■ 2,680.00 




3,880.00 


2,729.00 


16,534.41 


3,296.25 


22,559.66 


1,149.00 


6,309.41 


2,036.25 


9,494.66 


1,500.00 


8,665.00 


1,020.00 


11,185.00 


80.00 


1,560.00 


240.00 


1,880.00 


1,929.00 


13,507.75 


1,406.27 


16,843.02 


729.00 


9,974.65 


1,021.27 


11,724.92 


1,200.00 


3,533.10 


385.00 


5,118.10 


300.00 


9,825.09 


310:00 


10,435.09 


585.00 


11,111.91 


383.25 


12,080.16 


2,100.00 


9,403.92 


4,219.67 


15,723. .59 


900.00 


6,898.96 


3,339.67 


11,138.63 


800.00 


1,344.96 


640.00 


2,784.96 


400.00 


1,160.00 


240.00 


1,800.00 


1,716.66 


14,087.44 


1,078.50 


16,882.60 


916.66 


11,167.44 


1,078.50 


13,162.60 


800.00 


2,920.00 




3,720.00 



156 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



Table V. Spent for Teaching and Supervision — Continued. 



Superin- 
tendents. 



White 
Teachers. 



Colored 
Teachers. 



Mecklenburg 

Rural 

Charlotte 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Rural 

Troj- 

Moore 

Rural 

Carthage 

Southern Pines. 

Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount . . 

New Hanover 

Rural 

Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Rural 

Elizabeth City.. 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 

Person 

Rural 

Roxboro 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville 

Polk 

Randolph 

Rural 

Ashboro 

Randleman 



3,600.00 


$ 64,784.37 


$ 11,966.66 


1,500.00 


24,782.32 


3,980.66 


2,100.00 


40,002.05 


7,986.00 


300.00 


10,014.79 


373.00 


996.25 


7,743.48 


2,054.30 


356.25 


6,903.48 


1,554.30 


640.00 


840.00 


500.00 


3,000.00 


14,373.52 


2,588.68 


1,000.00 


11,258.52 


2,588.68 


1,000.00 


1,935.00 




1,000.00 


1,180.00 
27,264.71 




2,415.31 


5,846.66 


915.31 


16,654.10 


3,957.19 


1,500.00 


10,610.61 


1,889.47 


2,520.00 


■29,949.70 


10,447.85 


720.00 


10,060.00 


3,788.35 


1,800.00 


19,889.70 


6,659.50 


900.00 


10,111.65 


4,554.24 


900.00 


10,908.88 


1,796.75 


700.00 


8,998.20 


1,961.63 


417.54 


6,384.09 


2,159.71 


2,300.00 


14,140.67 


3,679.50 


500.00 


3,647.10 


1,564.50 


1,800.00 


10,493.57 


2,115.00 


600.00 


8,489.50 


3,522.50 


1,485.50 


5,209.46 


2,843.49 


235.50 


3,458.96 


2,137.49 


1,250,00 


1,750.50 


706.00 


1,800.00 


9,395.75 


2,641.80 


900.00 


6,272.00 


2,078.80 


900.00 


3,123.75 


563.00 


2,750.00 


29,415.83 


5,141.80 


1,, 500. 00 


24,214.63 


4,139.80 


1,250.00 


5,201.20 


1,002.00 


367.00 


3,845.90 


646.00 


2,736.06 


19,215.70 


2,138.00 


986.06 


14,975.70 


1,538.00 


900.00 


2,360.00 


600.00 


850.00 


1.880.00 





Total for 

Teaching and 

Supervision. 



80,351.03 

30,262.98 

50,088.05 

10,687.79 

10,794.03 

8,814.03 

1,980.00 

19,962.20 

14,847.20 

2,935.00 

2,180.00 

35,526.68 

21.526.60 

14,000.08 

42,917.55 

14,568.35 

28,349.20 

15,565.89 

13,605.63 

11,659.83 

8,961.34 

20,120.17 

5,711.60 

14,408.57 

12,612.00 

9,538.45 

5,831.95 

3,706.50 

13,837.55 

9,250.80 

4,586.75 

37,307.63 

29,854.43 

7,453.20 

4,858.90 

24,089.76 

17,499.76 

3,860.00 

2,730.00 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



157 



Table V. Spent fob Teaching and Supervision — Continued. 



Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham. 
Hamlet 

Robeson 

Rural 

Lumberton . . 
Maxton 

Rockingham 

Rural 

Reidsville 

Rowan 

Rural 

Salisbury 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 

Scotland 

Rural 

Laurinburg.. 

Stanly 

Rural 

Albemarle 

Stokes 

Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy.- 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Rural 

Monroe _ 

Vance 

Rural 

Henderson 



Superin- 
tendents. 


WTiite 
Teachers. 


1 

Colored 
Teachers. 


Total for 
Teaching and 
Supervision. 


2,060.00 


$ 13,470.78 


$ 3,369.12 


S 18,890.90 


1,060.00 


7,215.78 


2,379.12 


10,654.90 




4,185.00 


495 00 


4,680 00 


1,000.00 


2,070.00 


495.00 


3,565.00 


3,600.00 


29,984.11 


13,550.80 


47,134.91 


1,500.00 


25,934.11 


11,945.20 


39,379.31 


1,200.00 


2,520.00 


1,260.00 


4,980.00 


900.00 


1,530.00 


345.60 


2,775.60 


2,400 00 


23,540.07 


5,240.00 


31,180.07 


1,200.00 


18,003.22 


3,480.00 


22,683.22 


1,200.00 


5,536.85 


1,760.00 


8,496.85 


1,400.00 


34,528.75 


5,970.00 


41,898.75 


1,400.00 


24,000.00 


4,522.00 


29,922.00 




10,528.75 


1,448.00 


11,976.75 


1,000.00 


14,352.18 


1,754.16 


17,106.34 


1,700.00 


21,405.78 


3,843.04 


26,948.82 


900.00 


19,445.78 


3,273.04 


■23,618.82 


800.00 


1,960.00 


570.00 


3,330.00 


1,791.25 


7,135.00 


3,137.75 


12,064.00 


591.25 


4,686.25 


2,437.75 


7,715.25 


1,200.00 


2,448.75 


700.00 


4,348.75 


972.28 


10,931.98 


671.17 


12,575.43 


335.78 


8,797.35 


671.17 


9,804.30 


636.50 


2,134.63 
10,715.82 




2,771.13 


750.00 


784.96 


12,250.78 


2,463.00 


18,614.39 


1,684.00 


22,761.39 


1.263.00 


14,446.89 


1,244.00 


16,953.89 


1,200.00 


4,167.50 


440.00 


5, 807, 50 


350.00 


7,382.82 


334.95 


8,067.77 


650.00 


6,900.23 


100.00 


7,6.50.23 


95.00 


3,614.62 


851.39 


4,561.01 


1,900.00 


26,796.80 


4,998.75 


33, 695., 55 


900.00 


20,981.80 


' 4,233.75 


26,115.55 


1,000.00 


5,815.00 


765.00 


7,580.00 


2,700.00 


13,040.20 


3,835.57 


19,575.77 


900.00 


0,763.45 


1,785.02 


9,448.47 


1,800.00 


6,276.75 


2,050.55 


10,127.30 



158 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



Table V. Spent for Teaching and Supervision — Continued. 





Superin- 
tendents. 


White 
Teachers. 


Colored 
Teachers. 


Total for 
Teaching and 
Supervision. 


Wake 


S 3,750.00 


$ 51,840.47 


S 14,639.67 


$ 70,230.14 


Rural 


1,750.00 


23,919.68 


7,238.45 


32,908.13 


Raleigh 


2,000.00 


27,920.79 


7,401.22 


37,322.01 


Warren 


700.00 


10,124.75 


4,470.60 


15,295.35 


Washington 


1,819.00 


5,512.00 


2,5.33.50 


9,864.50 


Rural 


569.00 


3,315.00 


1,603.00 


5,487.00 


Roper 


50.00 


760.00 


365.00 


1,175.00 


Plvmouth - - 


1,200.00 


1,437.00 


565.50 


3,202.50 


Wat auga ^ — 


470.00 


8,356.43 


240.00 


9,066.43 


Wayne 


4,300.00 


27,229.62 


8,397.88 


39,927.50 


Rural : 


900.00 


12,635.00 


3,845.13 


17,380.13 


Goldsboro 


1,500.00 


11,464.62 


3,284.00 


16,248.62 


Mount Olive 


1,000.00 


1,600.00 


878.75 


3.478.75 


Fremont 


900.00 


1,530.00 


390.00 


2,820.00 


Wilkes 


2,021.18 


22,466.07 


1,836.13 


26,323.38 


Rural 


1,021.18 


20,066.07 


1,556.13 


22,643.38 


North Wilkesboro 


1,000.00 


2,400.00 


280.00 


3,680.00 


Wilson 


2,591.75 


30,714.50 


6,973.87 


40,280.12 


Rural 


1,000.00 


19.880.24 


3,703.87 


24,584.11 


Wilson City . - . _ . - 


1,591.75 


9,934.26 


3,065.00 


14,591.01 


Lucama 




900.00 


205.00 


1,105.00 


Yadkin 


636.53 


8,471.49 


743.90 


9,851.92 


Yancey 


366 .i)0 


6,300.00 


200.00 


6,866.00 


North Carolina . _ . - - - 


171,4,52.49 
78,071.75 


1,620,652.96 
1,126,059.83 


330,500.31 
, 229,519.20 

1 


2,122,605.76 


Rural .- 


1,433,650.78 


City 


93,380.74 


494,593.13 


100,981.11 


688,954.98 

i 



EXPENDITUEES, 1909-'10. 



159 



TABLE VI. SPENT FOR BUILDINGS AND SUPPLIES, 1909 '10. 

This table shows what was spent for the following: Fuel and janitors, fur- 
niture, libraries, supplies, schoolhouses (Avhitel, schoolhouses (colored), insur- 
ance and rent, and interest and sinking-fund account. 

SUMMAEY OF TABLE VI AND COMPARISON WITH 1908- '09. 



Fuel and janitors, 1909-10 

Fuel and janitors, 1908-09 

Increase 

Furniture, 1909-10 

Furniture, 1908-09 

Increase 

Libraries, 1909-'10 

Libraries, 1908-09 

Increase 

Supplies, 1909-' 10 

Supplies, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Houses (white), 1909-10 

Houses (white) , 1908-09 

Increase 

Houses (colored), 1909-10 

Houses (colored), 1908-'09 

Increase 

Insurance and rent , 1909-' 10 

Insurance and rent , 190S-'09 

Increase 

Interest, loan fund, etc., 1909-10 

Interest, loan fund, etc., 1908-09 

Increase 

Total for buildings and supplies, 1909-10 

Total for buildings and supplies, 190S-'09 

Increase 

Percentage for buildings and supplies, 1909-10 
Percentage for buildings and supplies, 1908-09 

Increase 



Rural. 



; 32,405.50 

27,744.17 

4,601.33 

45,834.91 

46,119.07 

*284.16 

10,096.43 

12,662.84 

*1,906.67 

11,403.93 

8,562.02 

2,841.91 

228,123.85 

254,590.89 

*26,467.04 

26,100.52 

25,056.90 

1,043.62 

9,382.70 

8,536.76 

845.94 

61,094.78 

51,546.33 

9,548.45 

424,442.62 

434,818.98 

*10,376.36 

19.9 

21.4 

*1.5 



City. 



$ 53,753.30 

54,997.03 

*1,243.73 

30,905.69 

18,824.18 

12,081.51 

1,985.87 

1,326.13 

659.74 

22,399.15 

19,330.18 

3,668.97 

75,928.59 

134,875.60 

*58,947.01 

16,789.72 

12,187.19 

4,602.53' 

9,722.93 

7,136.63 

2,586.30 

31,768.05 

28,344.04 

3,424.01 

243,253 30 

277,020.98 

*33,767.68 

23.1 

26.6 

*3.5 



North 
Carolina. 



S 86,158.80 

82,741.20 

3,417.60 

76,740.00 

64 ,'943. 25 

11,797.35 

12,082.30 

13,988.97 

*1,906.67 

33,803.08 

27,892.20 

5,910.88 

304,052.44 

389,466.49 

*85,414.05 

42,890.24 

37,244.09 

5,646.15 

19,105.63 

15,673.39 

3,432.24 

92,862.83 

79,890.37 

12,972.46 

667,695.92 

711,839.96 

*44, 144.04 

21.0 

23.2 

*<> 9 



♦Decrease. 



16,0 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



Table VI. Spent for Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 



Fuel 

and I ^ 
Janitors.! '■"^®- 



Furni- 



Sup- 
plies. 



Libra 



Insur- 
ance 
and 
Rent. 



Interest 

Loans, p>,,iiH;^o.„ Build- rj.^.-. 
Install- ^"^^ll"^^' ^n-= ' T*^^^'- 
ments, vvnue. 

etc. 



New 



mgs, 
Colored. 




EXPENDITITKES, 1909-'10. 



161 



Table VI. Spent for Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 





Fuel 

and 

Janitors. 


Furni- 
ture. 


Sup- 
plies. 


Libra- 
ries. 


Insur- 
ance 
and 

Rent. 


Interest 

Loans, 

Install- 
ments, 
etc. 


New 

Buildings, 

White. 


New 
Build- 
ings, 
Colored. 


Total. 


Camden 

Carteret 


S 140.00 

18.75 

65.25 

1,167.45 

530.93 

367.42 

269.10 

352.18 

468.70 

30.00 

340.00 

98.70 

596.91 

339.45 

257.46 


$ 21.30 
216.44 
250.84 
380.77 
136.45 
229.32 
15.00 
242.96 
169.52 
169.52 


$ 78.94 

3.95 

81.43 

307.98 

147.76 

102.52 

57.70 

19.97 


$ 

75.00 
111.78 
135.00 
135.00 


8 


$ 139.40 

699.70 

130.00 

1,537.14 

1,000.20 

21.00 

515.94 

743.20 

915.40 

915.40 


$ 1,202.43 

1,290.46 

969.77 

2,917.52 

1,999.10 

49.05 

869.37 

1,827.34 

1,773.61 

1,040.66 

700.00 

32.95 

2,783.78 

2,466.49 

317.29 

325.00 

17,617.55 

3,617.55 


S 23.22 

195.00 

46.52 

308.87 

297.65 


$1,605.29 
2,499.30 


Caswell 

Catawba _. 

Rural 

Hickory. . 


111.46 

221.60 

14.00 

137.60 

70.00 

85.59 


1,767.05 

6,976.33 

4,261.09 

906.91 


Newton 




11.22 
128.77 


1,808.33 


Chatham 

Cherokee 


135.00 
5.00 


3,535.01 
3,332.23 


Rural.. . . .. 






2,155.58 


Andrews . 




5.00 






1,045.00 


Murphy.. 












131.65 


Chowan.. . 


288.29 
288.29 


180.48 
137.24 
43.24 
10.00 
91.37 
36.37 
15.00 
40.00 


145.00 

120.00 

25.00 


298.57 
171.57 
127.00 




369.35 
369.35 


4,662.38 


Rural ... 




3,892.39 


Edenton.. 




769.99 


Clay 


25.00 

1,902.85 

767.85 

35.00 

1,100.00 

621.21 

1,131.42 

553.35 

578.07 

1,247.31 

1,214.94 

32.37 

185.52 
299.69 
569.82 
206.52 
175.30 
188.00 
193.18 
280.36 


100.90 
617.90 
617.90 




460.90 


Cleveland 

Rural 

Shelby 


1,125.51 

927.51 
192.00 
6.00 
212.09 
997.27 

84.35 
912.92 
546.52 

74.00 
417.27 

55.25 

97.32 

1,258.70 
645.03 
433.67 
180.00 
206.68 
325.51 


105.00 
105.00 


204.20 
54.20 


732.31 
620.31 
112.00 


22,396.69 

6,746.69 

354.00 


Kings Mountain 




150.00 

40.60 

315.10 

221.10 

94.00 

221.15 

45.15 

95.00 

81.00 

57.40 

45.00 

270.40 

106.60 

163.80 




14,000.00 

2,691.35 

13,909.69 

8,012.58 

5,897.11 

3,155.83 

2,938.53 

200.00 

17.30 

1,008.19 

167.79 

1,688.06 

1,296.36 

391.70 


15,296.00 


Columbus.. 


310.00 
271.99 
271.99 


1,633.90 
475.15 
272.80 
202.35 

1,934.36 
314.58 
989.78 
630.00 
570.80 
283.52 

1,008.00 
508.00 


225.21 
727.54 
644.23 

83.31 
318.74 
268.38 

50.36 


5,734.36 


Craven. ... 


425.71 
28.31 
397.40 
749.56 
695.86 
53.70 

9.60 


18,253.87 


Rural 

New Bern _ . . 


10,088.71 
8,165.16 


Cumberland 

Rural 

Fayetteville 


262.51 
262.51 


8,435.98 
5,813.95 
1,838.48 


Hope Mills 


181.41 


783.55 


Currituck 

Dare.. . .. . 


237.45 


2,347.69 
796.00 


Davidson 

Rural 

Lexington 


2,0.77 
79.72 

119.05 
72.00 
15.30 
31 . 33 


400.05 
345.05 


82.14 
82.14 


5,547.94 
3,269.42 
1,283.52 


Thomasville _ _ . 


55.00 


500.00 




995.00 


Davie 


22.00 
33.00 


563.85 
1,000.07 


471.19 
130.81 


1,472.20 


Duplin 


120.00 


1,114.60 


3,035.68 



Part 11—11 



162 



Expenditures^ 1909-'10. 



Table VI. Spent for Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 



Fuel 

and 

Janitors. 



Durham 83,971.06 



Rural 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Rural 

Tarboro 

Forsyth 

Rural 

Winston 

Kernersville . . 

Franklin." 

Rural 

Franklinton 

Louisburg 

Youngsville 

Gaston 

Rural 

Gastonia 

Cherry ville 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford 

Rural 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Guilford College 

Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck . 

Weldon 

Enfield 



687.33 

3,283.73 

1,201.65 

465.88 

735.77 

4,312.39 

1,252.39 

3,000.00 

60.00 

843.58 

152.60 

280.30 

296.68 

114.00 

2,286.26 

1,309.70 

953.46 

23.10 

324.47 

23.20 

673.43 

397.08 

276.35 

197.13 

3,280.45 

1,295.96 

1,069.50 

844.04 

70.95 

1,626.49 

418.17 

340.00 

343.33 

175.41 



Furni- 
ture. 



Sup- 
plies. 



Libra- 
ries. 



Insur- 
ance 
and 
Rent. 



Interest 
on 



New 
Build- 



ments, vvnue. , Colored. 
etc. 



Total. 



$1,750.09 

527.54 

1,222.55 

404.26 

367.06 

37.20 

1,728.81 

1,346.81 

300.00 

82.00 

357.02 

209.20 

97.25 
50.57 



1,537.06 
1,537.06 




143.87 



52,451.57 

559.54 

1,892.03 

186.98 

90.80 

96.18 

310.44 

135.44 

170.00 

5.00 

291.11 

35.61 

16.55 

225.00 

13.95 

841.76 

342.60 

458.66 

40.50 

40.92 



$ 307.09 

33.74 

273.35 

30.01 

30.01 

20.40 
20.40 



53.60 
45.00 



$ 850.82 |$1,346.60 



8.60 
120.00 
120.00 



60.00 



828.25 202.30 279.95 

782.20 128.77 269.95 

"46.05 73.53 ! 10.00 

808.78 51.20 ^ 60.00 

2,373.75 ! 2,605.20 I 561.13 

1,986.50 459.04 204.96 

j 1,393.85 

387.25 i 752.31 I 356.17 



1,030.10 
316.50 

1,433.94 
556.75 
877.19 
681.60 
441.60 



474.42 

376.40 

116.44 
57.49 
58.95 

306.20 
91.20 

125.00 ' 

90 00 240.00 
87.30 2,758.26 
39.30 ' 843.66 
48.00 . 511.60 

1,300.00 

103.00 

20.50 1,597.95 

5.50 1,593.70 

15.00 



104.00 



201.30 

123.80 

77.50 

96.60 



4.25 
219.00 

26.40 
925.53 
877.15 

48.38 
225.85 



190.86 I 1,945.54 
123.36 1,591.00 



67.50 354.54 



$20,971.63 j 

20,004.49 ' 

1 

967.14 

3,326.08 

3,201.78 

124.30 

3,076.91 

2,911.91 

150.00 

15.00 

645.05 

468.27 

172.53 



51,575.93 
1,325.93 

250.00 
75.51 
51.81 
23.70 

189.50 
78.20 
75.00 
36.30 

563.06 

546.55 



4.25 
3,291.20 
3,291.20 



2,168.56 

100.91 

9,645.22 

9,598.67 

46.55 

1,110.15 

19,283.30 

15,857.05 

1,630.14 

1,796.11 



873.05 
336.27 



Roanoke Rapids 349 . 58 



24.35 
164.53 
347.90 



510.66 
134.93 

15.00 
120.05 

42.52 
198.16 



146.45 
120.00 



26.45 



365.68 ! 1,828.00 

127.43 

I 407.60 

76.25 713.90 

105.00 

I 

162.00 601.50 



1,598.84 
1,474.46 



71.89 
52.49 



13.76 

2.75 

160.38 

160.38 



306.38 



117.69 

95.50 

22.19 

237.18 

922.44 

904.59 

17.85 



293.36 
293.36 



$33,224.79 

24,643.09 

8,581.70 

6,774.87 

4,821.58 

1,953.29 

10,626.25 

6,277.95 

3,820.00 

528.30 

5,598.98 

2,340.19 

1,028.98 

1,932.69 

297.12 

9,855.11 

8,360.14 

1,427.12 

67.85 

3,367.20 

150.51 

12,873.67 

12,273.12 

600.55 

2,786.89 

31,162.67 

22,422.46 

4,111.34 

4,557.92 

70.95 

7,242.53 

2,904.62 

762.60 

1,376.22 

539.95 

1,659.14 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



163 



• Table "VI. Spent for Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 



Fuel 

and 

Janitors. 



Furni- 
ture. 



Sup- 
plies. 



1 Insur- 

Libra- | ance 

ries. I and 

I Rent. 



Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville . 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville 

Statesville 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

Smithfield 

Jones 

Lee 

Rural 

Sanf ord 

Lenoir __. 

Pk.ural 

Kinston 

LaGrange 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincolnton 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Rural 

Williamston _ . 
Robersonville _ 



$ 327.24 . 
119.40 

207.75 
483.00 



$ 590.33 : $ 

552.00 i 

38.33 I 

183.25 1 

183.25 :... 



67.53 I $ 30.00 . .$ 86.00 
22.71 30,00 11.00 



Interest 
on 

Loans, 
Install- 
ments, 
etc. 



New 
Buildings, 

White. 



$ 282.90 
282.90 



44.82 
72.40 



480.00 
456.30 

I 

126.14 
330.16 
351.67 

I 

226.57 ' 
1,858.31 I 
600.00 
370.62 I 
881.69 
08.35 
1,358.42 
1,058.92 
130. 50 
169.00 
77.69 
320.36 
149.36 
171.00 j 
1,333.61 j 
227.38 
830.00 
276.23 
797.75 
391.92 
405.83 



145.87 
353.19 
106.26 
167.68 
79.25 



935.35 
549.74 
385.61 
210.88 
109 41 
1.676.96 
753.76 
100.00 
823.20 
803.28 
466.27 
448.62 

17.65 
256.15 
663.16 
578.79 

84.37 
831.83 

99.01 
482.82 
250.00 
344.35 
338.84 
5.5] ^ 

31.35 i. 
344.44 j 
146.55 I 
146.55 



72.40 
118.50 
64.05 
54.45 
50.03 



45.00 
45.00 



308.04 
125.00 



45.00 ! 

30.00 I 
254.50 
207.00 



183.04 

251.81 

97.02 



59.27 

37 75 

90.12 

204.02 

61.58 

142.44 

436.46 

135.77 

296.49 

4.20 

98.78 

23.55 

75.53 

48.68 
356.64 
145.26 

65.51 
145.87 



47.50 
90.00 
27.20 
11.70 



15.50 
55.00 
66.89 
66.89 



55.00 
45.00 
10.00 



93.19 

78.19 

15.00 

120.00 

30.00 

135.00 

135.00 



75.00 
100.00 



100.00 

81.60 

71.60 

10.00 

2.00 

58.95 

741.05 

624.25 

85.00 

31.80 

116.39 

302.12 

220.12 

38.00 

44.00 



789.20 
189.20 j 

600.00 

- 

622.60 
584.80 
37.80 j 
120.00 
677.60 I 
1,071.44 I 
631.44 



$ 2,138.15 

2,084.00 

54.15 

257.10 

40.20 

216.90 

1,668.69 

1,653.56 

15.13 

736.72 

1,045.85 

4,984.54 

3,750.00 



New 
Build- ; 
ings, 
Colored. ' 



Total. 



395.94 
395.94 



144.00 

24.00 

120.00 

299.20 

184.70 

47.00 

67.50 

191.93 

53.40 

138.53 

46.20 



440.00 
256.00 
998.20 
998.20 



859.30 
338.30 
521.00 
732.50 
200.00 
20.00 
512.50 
619.20 
619.20 



163.83 

113.61 

50.22 



3.85 

2.20 

1.65 

303.46 

86.99 

225.40 

205.00 



1,234.54 

3,578.04 

2,502.37 

2,271.58 

51.04 

179.75 

2,027.57 

1,139.47 

1,094.47 

45.00 

93.73 

22.33 

70.00 

1.40 

1,304.68 

1,304.68 



20.40 
111.85 
332.22 
304.58 
16.25 
11.39 
800.00 
293.40 
293 40 

578.01 
532.21 
30.00 
15.80 
55.31 
55.31 



312.60 2,684.79 

7.37.82 i 2,157.68 

420.00 i 1,808.25 

; 1,528.89 

300.00 j 148.78 

120.00 ' 130.58 



50.00 



303.25 

301.00 

2.25 



$3,918.09 
3,498.04 

420.05 
1,881.95 

412.65 
1.469.30 
3,931.89 
3,097.09 

834.80 

1,810.76 

2.235.37 

11,120.24 

6,896.45 

561.62 
3,662.17 
5,275.72 
6,083.82 
5,313.72 

295.06 

475.04 
3,306.53 
3,690.60 
2,606.79 
1,083.81 
4,360.34 
1,446.40 
1,786.31 
1,127.63 
3,505.19 
2,865.09 

640.10 
3,245.00 
3,464.49 
3,686.71 
2,476.57 

734.44 

475.70 



164 



Expenditures^ 1909-'10. 



Table VI. Spent fob Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 





Fuel 

and 

Janitors. 


Furni- 
ture. 


Sup- 
plies. 


libra- 
ries. 


Insur- 
ance 

and 
Rent. 


Interest 

on 
Loans, 
Install- 
ments, 

etc. 


New 

Buildings, 

White. 


New 
Build- 
ings, 
Colored. 


Total. 


McDowell 

Rural 


$ 682.44 
431.16 
251.28 
6,839.64 
1,420.23 
5,419.41 


$ 297.18 

75.38 

221.80 

2,906.86 

1,407.98 

1,498.88 

100.00 

47.70 

47.70 


$ 249.96 

176.24 

73.72 

2,193.89 
193.89 

2,000.00 


$ 72.00 
72.00 


$ 235.00 
235.00 


$3,339.92 

3,089.84 

250.08 

1,218.60 

921.60 

297.00 


S 384.97 


$ 


$5,261.47 
4,079.62 


Marion 


384.97 
1,476.17 
1,476.17 




1,181.85 


Mecklenburg 

Rural . 


60.00 
60.00 


248.55 
248.55 


4,285.60 
1,518.25 
2,767.35 


19,229.31 
7,246.67 


Charlotte 


11,982.64 


Mitchell 


10.00 






110.00 


Montgomery. 


101.88 

76.00 

25.88 

375.34 

17.09 

162.00 

196^25 

1,537.86 

391.96 

1,145.90 

4,536.08 

3,132.65 

1,403.43 

559.55 


2.75 
2.75 


8.00 
8.00 


335.90 
335.90 


691.43 
691.43 



78.61 
78.61 


1,266.27 


Rural 




1,240.39 


Troy 




25.88 


Moore 


504.30 
504.30 


69.70 

18.92 

18.60 

32.18 

444.41 

17.83 

426.58 

5,877.22 

1,834.70 

4,042.52 

163.60 

253.84 

• 72.76 

74.07 

526.88 

50.63 

476.25 

189.00 

20.39 

20.39 

98.86 

36.88 

61.98 

1,564.97 

1,153.24 

411.73 


110.39 
110.39 


10.20 
1.00 


832.52 
231.02 
601.50 


1,215.48 
1,215.48 


1,122.01 
1,122.01 


4,239.94 


Rural 

Carthage 


3,220.21 
782.10 


Southern Pines 






9.20 

365.34 

362.69 

2.65 

596.55 

516.85 

79.70 

178.55 

45.58 




237.63 


Nash 


2.962.83 

1,472.15 

1,490.68 

1,998.71 

998.71 

1,000.00 

313.08 

472.30 

80D.51 

321.12 

2,560.00 

879.42 

1,680.58 

180.16 

123.01 

30.05 

92.96 

217.57 

135.32 

82.25 

385.55 

216.85 

168.70 


442.23 

422.23 

20.00 


2,118.78 

820.40 

1,298.38 


8,014.02 

5,739.18 

2,274.84 

10,357.84 

5,357.84 

5,000.00 

3,528.22 

2,143.44 

1,221.33 

750.22 

966.57 

49.12 

917.45 

1.454.78 

823.64 

726.82 

96.82 

410.52 

399.85 

10.67 

913.94 

833.56 

80.38 


256.30 
177.98 
78.32 
493.97 
375.88 
118.09 
127.10 


16,141.77 


Rural 


9,404.42 


Rocky Mount _. 
New Hanover 


6,737.35 
23,860.37 


Rural 






12,216.63 


Wilmington 






11,643.74 


Northampton 

Onslow 


300.00 
180.00 
180.00 


702.00 

410.12 

462.50 

830.69 

2,969.90 

89.90 

2,880.00 

1,024.00 

1,188.90 

122.40 

1,066.50 


5,872,10 
3,505.28 


Orange 


197.97 
91.78 

2,350.26 
300.69 

2,049.57 
183.99 
620,02 
172.85 
447.17 
450.08 
153.17 
296.91 
935.96 
481.63 
454.33 


42.69 

280.95 

579.47 

458.91 

120.56 

432. 10 

611.80 

603.95 

7.85 

14.03 

14.03 


2,977.76 


Pamlico 


254.80 
57.50 
10.00 
47.50 

113.00 
39.60 
39.60 


2,603.63 


Pasquotank 

Rural 

Elizabeth City 


131.26 
131.26 


10,141.84 
1,969,93 
8,171.91 


Pender 

Perquimans 

Rural - _ 


50.00 
43.46 


3,627.03 
3,470,82 
1,716.06 


Hertford . . . 


43.46 


1,754.76 


Person 


8.00 
8.00 


1,199.06 


Rural -- 







747.25 


Roxboro 






451.81 


Pitt.._ _.. 


304.60 

270.00 

34.60 


337.76 
195.61 
142.15 


2,498.37 

2,195.65 

302.72 


637 64 

577.54 

60.10 


7,578.79 


Rural- 

Greenville 


5,924.08 
1,654.71 



Expenditures^, 1909-'10. 



165 



Table VI. Spent fob Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 



Fuel 

and 

Janitors, 



Polk 

Randolph 

Rural 

Ashboro 

Randlemau-- 

Richmond 

Rural - _ 

Rockingham.. 
Hamlet 

Robeson 

Rural 

Lumberton 

Maxton 

Rockingham.... 

Rural 

Reidsville 

Rowan 

Rural 

Salisbury 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 

Scotland 

Rural 

Laurinburg 

Stanly 

Rural 

Albemarle 

Stokes 

Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy... 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 



$ 138.20 
1,085.33 
366.11 
294.22 
425.00 
766.96 
101.00 
370.77 
295.19 
630.48 
192.73 
200.00 
237.75 
1,085.39 
253.02 
832.37 
824.48 
824.48 



Furni- 
ture. 



I Insur- 
Sup- 1 Libra- ance 
plies. ries. and 

Rent. 



$ 108.88 

1,335.96 

1,165.67 

170.29 



536.36 
134.86 
145.20 
256.30 
1,048.43 
956.93 



56.05 
175.30 

91.22 

84.08 
321.03 

99.08 
221.95 
434.48 
194.41 
240.07 
144.14 
824.24 
267.88 ; 
556.36 j 
259.32 [ 
258.98 j 

82.35 



91.50 
1,748.69 
1,601.94 
146.75 
1,603.60 
1,603.60 



543.44 
543.84 
543.84 



1,844.15 
138.22 

1,705.93 
217.11 
217.11 



249.51 
118.46 

82.37 

48.68 
298.67 

16.20 
192.79 

89.68 
1,243.06 
588.03 
300.00 
355.03 
361.80 

45.00 
316.80 

57.48 

57.48 



Interest | 
j°"- i New 
InS'- Builjings, 
ments, vvniie. 
etc. 



219.64 1 131.75 
157.52 
62.12 



337.45 
231.48 
100.00 
5.97 
205.00 
205.00 



34.54 
188.20 



75.62 

60.00 

15.62 

195.00 

195.00 



New 
Build- 
ings, 
Colored. 



$ 59.60 

2,987.63 

2,181.60 

113.00 780.80 

18.75 ! 25.23 

159.71 5,376.95 

90.21 550.60 

12.50 j 

57.00 4,826.35 
168.45 I 1,057.20 
132.45 I 1,057.20 



120.00 



36.00 
545.59 
463.36 

82.23 
128.52 
128.52 



808.53 
754.60 
754.60 



247.35 

1,687.01 

29.78 



188.20 
116.07 

116.07 
10.83 
10.83 



97.95 
182.68 
182.68 



1,394.29 
666.60 
727.69 
870.60 

870.60 



592.64 
488.22 
488.22 



69.00 
69.00 



30.00 
30.00 



182.81 

70.61 

112.20 



20.85 



135.00 
208.28 
208.28 



516.00 

1.00 

515.00 

103.50 

28.50 

75.00 

12.60 

56.68 

56.68 



750.00 



$ 471.60 I $ 

6,462.48 

5,646.51 

32.30 

783.67 

2,282.89 

1,833.37 

49.52 

400.00 

4,724.95 

4,493.62 



14.20 
7.50 
7.50 



380.31 

344.16 

36.15 



231.33 
3,496.94 
3,442.22 
54.72 
2,060.04 
2,060.04 



928.46 
865.21 



63.25 
830.44 
133.21 
697.23 
162.56 
162.56 



2,200.00 I 768.90 
2,731.49 J 139.72 
2,731.49 i 139.72 



140.00 



78.00 
99.00 



750.00 
993.80 
481.20 
512.60 
434.54 
936.40 
907.40 
29.00 
528.60 
775.90 



27,206.63 

408.65 

26,797.98 

1,501.65 

1,386.10 

115.55 

1,607.93 

3,807.36 

3,636.46 

170.90 

753.23 

2,175.51 

255.92 



174.10 
174.10 



70.14 
70.14 



34.91 
50.16 
50.16 



533.41 
40.98 



Total. 



$ 792.48 

12,479.80 
9,643.37 
1,535.10 
1,301.33 

10,139.30 

3,301.88 

906.93 

5,930.49 

10,006.03 
8,491.17 
500.00 
1,014.86 
9,538.76 
6,665.35 
2,873.41 
5,902.28 
5,902.28 



4,413.52 
4,449.45 
4,177.17 

272.28 
30,996.98 

890.05 

30,106.93 

3,361.51 

2,418.29 

943.22 
3,177.65 
6,820.53 
5,952.07 

868.46 
1,866.50 
5,690.66 

409,03 



166 



Expenditures^ 1909-'10. 



Table VI. Spent for Buildings and Supplies — Continued. 



Fuel 

and 

Janitors. 



Furni- 
ture. 



Union :. $540.78 

Rural 107.50 

Monroe j 433.28 

Vance ' 931.70 

Rural 388.45 

Henderson 543.25 

Wake..- : 5,231.32 

Rural 1,483.47 

Raleigh ' 3,747.85 




Warren 

Washington 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive 

Fremont 

Wilkes - 

Rural 

No. Wilkesboro. 

Wilson 

Rural 

Wilson City 

Lucama 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

North Carolina . . 

Rural 

City 



185.63 
293.05 
115.68 
00.87 
116.50 



2,747.77 
778.38 

1,667.77 
188.62 
113.00 
223.70 
115.70 
108.00 

2,182.69 
548.10 

1,484.59 

150.00 

200.08 

.50 



236.70 

175.53 

61.17 

2,253.63 

1.596.33 

657.30 

305.41 



Sup- 
plies. 



Libra- 
ries. 



Insur- 
ance 
and 
Rent. 



$ 554.55 

59.03 

495.52 

225.94 

80.92 

145.02 

1,468.54 

416.25 

1,052.29 

208.08 

170.85 

42.18 

35.18 

93.49 



$ 150.00 

50.00 

100 00 

40.75 

40.75 



85.00 
15.00 
70.00 
30.00 
24.00 



24.00 



36.00 

1,210.33 

823.89 

214.43 

95.73 

76.28 

385.35 

235.35 

150.00 

634.25 

471.20 

163,05 

184.33 
38 00 



466.95 
76.70 



79.86 
55.05 



% .58.30 

34, 30 

24.00 

454.50 

71.10 

383.40 

954.64 

485.40 

469.24 

24.10 

132.00 

72.00 



Interest I I 

on ! j^ I New 

^?^li Buildings,' Build- ; Total. 
White. 



Install- 
ments, 
etc. 



ings, 
Colored. 




60.00 



53.58 
336.67 
87.05 
47.30 
39.75 
245.97 

145.97 

100.00 

14.05 

77.14 



1,819.23 
119.49 

I 1,597.74 

1 
24.81 1 45.00 

I 

57 00 

420.00 .32.00 
420.00 32.00 



1,251.60 1 $ 104.38 
1,251.60 I 104.38 



230.00 



5,319.13 

3,636.43 

1,682.70 

059.60 ! 

244.25 

182.00 



230.00 

12,740.81 

11,289.77 

1,451.04 

2,433.13 

53.76 

.53.76 



62.25 

399.32 

1,459.53 

1,313.50 



546.05 

365.23 

180.82 

10,550.45 

406.54 

10,143.91 

660.92 

51.11 

51.11 



430.00 i 383.10 
405.00 I 169.10 

' 114.00 

25.00 ' 100.00 
60.00 



42.90 

103.13 

1,093.33 

1,093.33 



112.67 
3,525.58 
2,413.31 

523.27 
27.25 !_ 

561.75 ;. 
4,057.23 
4,057.23 1 



507.00 
402.40 
104.60 



11.00 
11.00 



1,114.05 
657.00 
457.05 



30.00 



86,158.80 
32,405.50 
53,753 30 



76,740.60 
,45,834.91 
30,905.69 



33,803.08 
11,403.93 
22,399.15 



216.00 



12,082.30 j 19, 105. 63 



10,096.43 
1,985.87 



9,382.70 
9,722.93 



156.80 
673.29 



3,523.58 565.51 
1,773.80 ' 366.49 

249.78 199 02 
1,500.00 i 

809.70 I 



$3,187.53 

2,134.73 

1,052.80 

2,665.64 

1,121.98 

1,543.60 

38, 603.. 52 

19,329.19 

19,274.33 

4,506.87 

969.02 

516.73 

96.05 

356.24 

547.99 

11,816.25 

5,982.72 

4,107.81 

477.89 

1,247.83 

6.309.66 

6.011.91 

297.75 

9,079.15 

4,390.69 

2,813.46 

1,875.00 

1,424.90 

1,034.93 



92,862.83 
61,094.78 
31,768.65 



304,052.44 42,890.24 
228,123.85 126,100.52 



75,928.59 



16,789.72 



667,695.92 
424,442.62 
243,253.30 



I 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



167 



TABLE VII. SPENT FOR ADMINISTRATION, ETC., 1909-'10. 

This table shows what was paid for the administration of the school fund — 
treasurer, board of education, comniitteenieu, taking school census, errors, 
overcharges, and all other expenses. 

Summary of Table VII and Compaeison with 1908-'09. 



Treasurer, 1909-'10 

Treasurer, 1908-09 , . _ 

Increase 

Board of Education, 1909-' 10 

Board of Education, 1908-09 

Increase 

Taking census and committeemen, 1909-'10-- 
Talcing census and committeemen, 1908-09- . 

Increase 

Other expenses, 1909-10 

Otlier expenses, 1908-09 

Increase 

Total for administration, 1909-10 

Total for administration, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Percentage spent for administration, 1909-10 
Percentage spent for administration, 1908-'09 

Increase 



Rural. 



41,601.49 

40.347.79 

1,253.70 

19,061.56 

19,342.18 

*280.62 

11,924.08 

10,760.22 

1,163.86 

34,450.54 

22,049.21 

12,401.33 

107,037.67 

92,499.40 

14,538.27 

5.0 

4.6 

.4 



City. 



5,959.50 

6,834.50 

*875.00 

81.32 

60.88 

20.44 

2,037.56 

1,211.83 

825.73 

9,121.29 

15,053.63 

*5,932.34 

17,199.67 

23,160.84 

*5,961.17 

1.6 

2.2 

*.6 



Nortli 
Carolina. 



47,560.99 

47,182.29 

378.70 

19,142.88 

19,403.06 

*260.18 

13,961.64 

11,972.05 

1,989.59 

43,571.83 

37,102.84 

6,468.99 

124,237.34 

115,660.24 

8,577.10 

3.9 

3.8 

.1 



* Decrease. 



168 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



Table VII. Spent for Administration, Etc. — Continued. 





Treasurer. 


Board of Education. 


Census. 


All Other 
Expenses. 






Mileage 

and Per 

Diem. 


Expenses. 


Total. 


Alamance 


$ 584.31 
559.31 


$ 102.10 
102.10 


$ 181.15 
181.15 


$ 123.00 

55.76 

29.24 

20.24 

10.34 

7.42 

63.02 

65.00 

175.28 

175.28 


$ 271.36 
225.53 


$ 1,261 92 


Rural - - 


1,123 85 


Burlington . . 


29.24 


Graham.. _. _. 


25.00 






25.38 

7.20 

13.25 

309.08 


70 62 


Haw River .... 






17 54 


Mebane . . 








20 67 


Alexander . . 


249.93 
162.47 
527.22 
411.55 
115.67 
270.66 
99.56 
99.56 


102.90 
106.40 
217.40 
217.40 




724 93 


Alleghany 


66.62 
17.45 
17.45 


400 49 


Anson .. .. . 


391.56 
391.56 


1,328 91 


Rural. . -. 


1,213.24 


Wadesboro . .. 


115.67 


Ashe - 


109.70 
146.40 
146.40 


35.50 
430.73 
430.73 


51.60 
141.76 
141.76 


12.51 
734.75 
734.75 


479 97 


Beaufort . 


1,553 20 


Rural -. 


1,553.20 


Washington 




Belhaven . 















Bertie. . . 


427.14 
427. 14 


52.00 
52.00 


13.00 
13.00 


93.19 
93.19 


339.91 
339.91 


925.24 


Rural ... 


925.24 


Aulander 




Windsor. . . . 











• 




Bladen . 


340.00 
191.48 
1,151.57 
595.36 
556.21 
388.65 
313.65 

75.00 
572.38 
502.58 

69.80 
557.83 
384.23 
150.00 

23.60 


99.50 
121.82 
311.30 
311.30 




276.04 

41.94 

506.88 

376.74 

130.14 

114.42 

78.42 

36.00 

113.46 

74.77 

38.69 

105.94 

101.30 


368.08 

90.47 

2,762.02 

1,696.28 

1,065.74 

417.02 

181.65 

235.37 

201.69 

114.59 

87.10 

197.62 

101.47 

75.75 

20.40 


1,083.62 


Brunswick 




445.71 


Buncombe 


112.99 
112.99 


4,844 76 


Rural 

Asheville _ _. .. 


3,092.67 
1,752.09 


Burke 


89.30 
89.30 




1,009 39 


• Rural . 




663.02 


Morganton.. . . . . 




346.37 


Cabarrus 


67.70 
67.70 


36. (fl 
36.01 


991 24 


Rural 

Concord . 


795.65 
195.59 


Caldwell 


100.10 
100.10 


23.15 
23.15 


984 64 


Rural . . . . 


710.25 


Lenoir .. .. 


225.75 


Granite 








44 00 


Rhodhiss . . .. 






4.64 
38.40 


4.64 


Camden 


155.61 


74.70 


39.50 


54.02 


362.23 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



169 



Table VII. Spent fob Administration, Etc. — Continued. 





Treasurer. 


Board of Education. 


Census. 


AU Other 
Expenses. 






Mileage 

and Per 

Diem. 


Expenses. 


Total. 


Carteret- - -- - - 


$ 140.12 
240.46 
570.00 
570.00 


$ 74.10 
83.40 
59.30 
59.30 


$ 

7.50 
178.25 
178.25 


$ 

97.70 

102.16 

99.28 


$ 134.27 
312.55 
259.94 
216.45 


$ 348.49 


Caswell 

Catawba 


741.61 
1.169.65 


Rural 


1,123.28 


Hickorv 




Newton- 








2.88 
73.50 
58.82 
48.46 
10.36 


43.49 
274.74 
320.00 
320.00 


46.37 


Chatharn 


476.95 
336.64 
336.64 


90.10 
108.14 
108.14 


106.51 
128.79 
128.79 


1,021.80 


Cherokee - 


952.39 


Rural - __ -_ 


942.03 




10.36 


Murohv 












Chowan _ _ _ 


418.57 
241.95 
176.62 
78.20 
744.81 
639.11 
105.70 


60.20 
60.20 


140.41 
140.41 


113.25 
103.25 
10.00 
30.00 
282.22 
270.97 


431.36 

381.05 

50.31 


1,163.79 


Rural . . - 


926.86 


Edenton 


236 93 


Clay 


38.00 
86.35 
86.35 




146.20 


Cleveland 


45.10 
45.10 


148.86 
148.86 


1,307.34 


Rural 


1,190.39 


Shelby 

Kings Mountain 


105.70 




11.25 
189.22 
171.76 
171.76 




11.25 


Columbus 

Craven ___ 


561.56 
756.05 
596.05 
160.00 
977.02 
666.01 
231.01 
80.00 
281.03 
136.66 
564.21 
478.99 


57.70 
79.80 
79.80 


439.14 
47.51 
47.51 


151.20 
569.51 
324.91 
244.60 
458.87 
125.00 
252.67 

81.20 
968.21 

53.44 
680.48 
370.07 


1,398.82 
1,624.63 


Rural - - - _ _ _ 


1,220.03 


New Bern 


404.60 


Cumberland 

Rural 

Fayetteville 


78.80 
78.80 


204.36 
204.36 


124.68 
48.03 
66.65 
10.00 
32.82 
41.84 
188.60 
188.60 


1,843.73 

1,122.20 

550.33 


Hope Mills. .. _ - 






171.20 


Currituck 


87.40 
52.50 
79.00 
79.00 


107.52 
115.78 


1,476.98 


Dare - - - _ _ 


400.22 


Davidson.. _ . 


1,512.29 


Rural 




1,116.66 


Lexington _ . . 






Thomasville 


85.22 
239.88 
504.20 
1,155.70 
855.70 
300.00 






310.41 
277.52 
108.29 
1,030.82 
381.29 
649.53 


395.63 


Davie __ 


75.40 

82.60 
268.89 
268.89 


76.31 

85.82 

196.10 

196.10 


36.98 
148.10 
592.04 
112.04 
480.00 


706.09 


Duplin. . . 


929.01 


Durham. .. . 


3,243.55 


Rural . . 


1,814.02 


Durham 


1,429.53 



170 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



Table VII. Spent fok Administration, Etc. — Continued. 





Treasurer. 


Board of Education. 


Census. 


All Other 
Expenses. 






Mileage 

and Per 

Diem. 


■ 
Expenses. 


Total. 


Efleecombe 


S 1,050.98 

*950.98 

100.00 

35 00 


$ 61.60 
61.60 


$ 


1 
$ . 335 93 $ 831 10 


$ 2 279 61 


Rural 




309.33 i 376.65 

[ 
26.60 ' 454.45 

256.68 1 3.34 95 


1,698 56 


Tarboro - 




581 05 


Forsvth 


132.80 
132.80 


80.15 


839 58 


Rural 


80.15 


174.54 


334.95 


722 44 


Winston __ 


25.00 
10.00 

604.80 




75.00 


100.00 


Keniersville 


1 
1 


7.14 




17 14 


Franklin _ - 


114.60 


57.50 
57.50 


194.18 


814 62 


1,785.70 


Rural - - -- - -- 


423.19 114.60 


1 

158.66 540.60 

1 

10.12 107 2fi 


1,294.55 


Franklinton _ - 






117 38 


Louisburg - ^ - 


139.06 

42.55 

600.00 

600 00 






25.40 


85.00 

81.76 

718.23 

71S 23 


249.46 


Youngsville 






124.31 


Gaston. _ . - _ 


20.50 


250.00 


266.28 


1,855.01 


Rural 


20 .50 1 2,50 no 1 266 28 


1,855 01 


Gastonia . _ 


1 






Cherry ville - _ _ 












Gates . . 


305.68 


"1 
75.40 1 81.21 1 75.88 


31.50 


569.67 


Graham 

Granville 


75.90 1 79.84 
752 73 58.20 


17.40 


1 
36.66 1 162.38 

■ 

167.74 : S4fi.39 


372.18 
1,825.06 


Rural-. - 


684.29 

68.44 

223 96 


58.20 




157.74 
10 00 


824.89 
21 .50 


1,725.12 


Oxford 




99 94 


Greene 


40 70 42 40 


82 42 69 17 


458.65 


Guilford.. _. _ . 


310 90 291 50 


294.36 


1,608.23 
941.50 


2,504.99 


Rural .... __ _. _ 




291 50 




224.36 


1,4.57.36 


Greensboro . . '. . 










527.63 
139.10 


527.63 


High Point 


319.90 






70.00 


520.00 


Guilford College. . 












Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck 


948.01 
599.49 


69.50 ; 141.55 
69.50 141.55 


371.50 
356.50 


248.80 
27.91 


1,779.36 
1,194.95 


Weldon 


100.00 
148.52 
100.00 
437.61 
426.71 
10.00 


1 




60.00 


160.00 


Enfield . _ 


i 




148.52 


Roanoke Rapids 




15.00 


160.89 


275.89 


Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn. ... 


. 

135.80 
135.80 


68.00 
68.00 


115.38 73.43 

106.02 65.33 

9.36 8.10 


829.32 

801.86 

27.46 



♦Two years. 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



171 



Table VII. Spent for Administration, Etc. — Continued. 





Treasurer. 


Board of Education. 


1 
Census. 


All Other 
Expenses. 






Mileage 

and Per 

Diem. 


I 
Expenses. 


Total. 


Hay wood J .; 


$ 317.97 
317.97 


$ 99.65 
99.65 


$ 4.50 
4.50 


$ 64.59 
64.59 


$ 22.50 
22.50 


$ 509.21 


Rural 

Wavnesville 


509 21 


Henderson 


362.65 

362.65 


271.50 
271,50 


324.25 
324.25 


45.96 

30.00 

15.96 

111.24 

39.11 

199.73 

175.73 

24.00 


359.92 
359.92 


1,364.28 


Rural 


1,348 32 


Henderson ville 


15 96 


Hertford 


278.57 
198.77 
886.90 
684.90 
102.00 
100.00 
398.12 
802.83 
752.83 


85.10 

90.00 

125.00 

125.00 




27.60 

70.78 

100.00 

100.00 


.560.82 
34.. 50 
625.40 
278.00 
278.00 
69.40 
348.25 
742.93 
742.93 


1,063 33 


Hyde _ -- - -_- - 


433.16 


Iredell - -- . --- 


1,937.03 


Rural 


1,363 63 


Mooresville - 


404.00 


Statesville 


169 40 


Jackson. - 


41.90 
91.37 
91.37 


102.61 
40.04 


58.10 
214.20 
202.20 

12.00 


948.98 


Johnston 


1,891 37 


Hural - -- - 


1,789.33 


Selma 




12 00 


Smithfleld . _ _ . 


50.00 
341.37 
314.89 
264.89 

50.00 
376.29 
326.29 

50 00 




40.04 
42.00 




90.04 


Jones . - -■ -- 


116.14 
90.15 
90.15 


47.03 

74.92 
74.92 




546.54 


Lee - - - _ - 


165.74 
165.74 


645.70 


Rural 




595 70 


Sanf ord . . . - - 


50.00 


Lenoir. _-_ 


59.00 
.59.00 


39.49 
39.49 


248.66 

182.32 

52.00 

14.34 

62.06 

41.14 

20.92 

189.09 

103.24 

125.40 

115.40 


146.79 
"7.76 


870.23 


Rural - --.._. 


614.86 


Kinston 


102 00 


LaGrange- - -_ . 






139.03 
107.40 
107.40 


153.37 


Lincoln . 


348.77 
348.77 


75.80 
75.80 


71.90 
71.90 


665.93 


Rural - ---- 


645.01 


Lincolnton _ -- 


20.92 


Macon 


282.29 

341.05 

• 473.73 

349.45 

74.28 

50.00 

463.72 

413.72 

.50.00 


81.20 
205.45 
129.80 
129.80 


114.00 
10.62 


175.00 
188.97 
361.85 
356.95 


841.58 


Madison. 


849.33 


Martin -_ _ 


1,090.78 


Rural 


. 


951.60 


Williamston . _ 




74.28 


Roberson ville 






10.00 
73.44 
73.44 


4.90 

000.72 

560.10 

40.62 


64.90 


McDowell 


60.10 
60 10 


486.20 
486.20 


1,684.18 


Rural - - 


1,593.56 


Marion _ __ 


90.62 



172 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



Table VII. Spent for Administration, Etc. — Continued. 



Mecklenburg 

Rural 

Charlotte 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Rural 

Troy 

Moore 

Rural 

Carthage 

Southern Pines- 

Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount -- 

New Hanover 

Rural 

Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange • — 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Rural •-- 

EUzabeth City_ 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 

Person 

Rural 

Roxboro - 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville 

Polk 



Board of Education. 



Treasurer. 



Mileage 

and Per 

Diem. 



806.00 

606.00 ' 

200.00 

266.52 

271.49 

271.49 



220.40' 
220.40 



112.00 
74.30 
74.30 



Expenses. 



Census. 



All Other 
Expenses. 



276.00 $ 595.16 ' $ 166.75 

276.00 I 174.11 ! 166.75 

I 421.05 ! 

25.00 ' 150.00 I 150.00 

78.57 I 67.42 j 225.85 

78.57 , 67.42 i 225.85 



465.67 
465.67 



46.10 
46.10 



119.60 
117.60 



1,142.00 
632.00 



880.16 

755.16 

125.00 

1,074.46 

1,074.46 



67.20 
67.20 



72.25 
72.25 



29.60 
29.60 



2.00 
311.68 
311.68 



510.00 
388.37 
388.37 



58.89 
58.89 



35.12 
35.12 



172.00 
172.00 



Total. 



$ 2,064.31 
1,443.26 
621.05 
703.52 
717.63 
717.63 



483.37 
366.56 
338.34 
249.61 
521.24 
321.24 
200.00 
378.30 
179.39 
179.39 



241.34 
236.34 
5.00 
768.32 
768.32 

126.46 



140.20 
63.60 
73.80 
87.80 
84.00 
84.00 



94.24 
113.68 
434.36 

49.42 



138.45 
33.00 
33.00 



58.11 
41.32 
41.32 



74.80 
74.80 



51.84 
51.84 



44.80 
44.80 

98.40 



657.65 
657.65 

31.16 



156.20 

61.90 
102.46 i 
146.50 L 
107.76 j 

52.02 { 

55.74 
281.48 j 

47.46 J. 

47.46 !- 



305.16 
177.71 
676.99 



526.17 
324.29 
201.88 
172.50 



99.42 I 
99.42 



4.40 
4.40 



16.02 
16.02 

38.36 



107.99 
107.99 

4.00 



1,773.37 
1,261.37 



512.00 
1,677.01 
1,552.01 

125.00 
1,412.72 
1,412.72 



1.179.17 
783.45 

1,625.95 
533.33 

1,239.17 
781.55 
457.62 

1,028.84 
301.17 
301.17 



471.80 

466.80 

5.00 

1,594.78 

1,594.78 

298.38 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



173 



Table VII. Spent for Administration, Etc. — Continued. 





Treasurer. 


Board of Education. 


Census. 


All Other 
Expenses. 






Mileage 

and Per 

Diem. 

1 


Expenses. 


Total. 


Randolph 


$ 744.73 

661.66 

64.61 

18.46 

331.70 

331.70 


$ 62.00 
62.00 


$ 490.13 
490.13 


$ 95.12 

66.72 

13.40 

15.00 

117.48 

117.48 


$ 330.15 
330.15 


$ 1,722.13 


Rural - • - 


• 1,610.66 


Ashboro 


78.01 


Randleman 








.33.46 


Richmond . . 


36.30 
36.30 


46.40 
46.40 


316.03 
215.94 


847.91 


Rural- . -- 


747.82 


Rockingham 




Hamlfit . 


1 

i 




100.09 

185.20 

135.20 

50.00 


100.09 


Robeson .. 


1,252.84 

1,117.84 

75.00 

60.00 

198.60 

198.60 


125.20 
125.20 


324.15 
324.15 


212.92 
199.72 


2,100.31 


Rural- - 


1,902.11 


Lumberton 


125.00 


Maxton 






13.20 
142.40 
142.40 


73.20 


Rocliingham - - - - 


92.00 
92.00 


88.20 
88.20 


3,864.94 
3,680.81 
184.13 
565.96 
308.71 
257.25 
113.05 
210.32 
210.32 


4,386.14 


Rural - - .- 


4,202.01 


Reidsville 


184.13 


Rowan _ 


450.00 
450.00 


113.50 
113.50 


69.60 
69.60 


178.88 
178.88 


1,377.94 


Rural-- -- 


1,120.69 


Salisbury 


257.25 


Rutherford - _- 


443.34 

1.847.26 

1,801.70 

45.56 

211.62 

211.62 


87.60 
60.50 
60.50 


284.08 
320.43 
320.43 


158,94 
282.62 
282.62 


1,087.01 


Sampson .. .- 


2,721.13 


Rural - 


2,675.57 


Clinton 


45.56 


Scotland 


15.80 
15.80 


220.00 
220.00 


137.82 
137.82 


217.00 
217.00 


802.24 


Rural 


802.24 


Laurinburg. 




Stanly 


265.46 
265.46 


44.56 
44.56 




110.84 
110.84 


433.13 
433.13 


853.99 


Rural - - 




853.99 


Albemarle -. . 






Stokes 


343.41 
505.32 
505:32 


99.40 
64.70 
64.70 


.60 
52.25 
52.25 


140.60 
73.72 
45.64 
28.08 
40.53 
33.64 
19.53 


411.30 
183.63 
183.63 


995.31 


Surry 


879.62 


Rural - 


851.54 


Mount Airy - 


28.08 


Swain 


230.87 
278.60 
102.38 


53.00 
48.00 
12.50 


8.12 


175.44 

455.26 

20.05 


507.96 


Transylvania 


815.50 


Tyrrell 


57.00 


211.46 



17-i 



Expenditures, 1909-'10. 



Table VII. Spent fok Administration, Etc. — Continued. 





Treasurer. ' 


Board of Education. 

1 


Census. 


j 

All Other 
Expenses. 

i 






Mileage 

and Per 

Diem. 


Expenses. 


Total. 


Union - _ _ . 


$ 645.47 
645.47 


$ 77.60 
■ 77.60 


$ 121.08 
121.08 




$ 222.56 
222.56 ! 


$ 363.46 

349.65 

13.81 

331.23 

181.23 

150.00 

5,102.91 

3,283.67 

1,819.24 

424.58 

81.90 

69.15 

12.75 


$ 1,430.17 


Rural--. 

Monroe _ - - 


1,416.36 
13.81 


Vance -_-_ .- 


695.01 

538-. 02 

156.99 

2,696.45 

1,741.05 

955.40 

442.70 

235.06 

166.16 

38.90 

30.00 

195.49 

834.53 

709.53 

75.00 

25.00 

25.00 

649.71 

599.71 

50.00 

764.34 

689.34 

75.00 


47.50 
47.50 




50.06 
50.06 


1,123.80 


Rural 




816.81 


Henderson 




306.99 


Wake 


229.40 
229.40 


549.81 
549.81 


431.48 

231.48 

200.00 

226.16 

41.26 

28.26 

13.00 


9,010.05 


Rural 

Raleigh - - 


6,035.41 
2,974.64 


Warren .^ 


69.60 
43.50 
43.50 


22.60 
24.21 

24.21 


1,185.64 


Washington 

Rural 


425.93 
331.28 


Roper 


64.65 


Plymouth 


^ 


30.00 


Watauga - 


42.65 
59.20 
59.20 


1 


73.90 
403.04 
363.04 


44.00 
989.07 
540.31 
429.76 

19.00 


356.04 


Wayne 

Rural 

Goldsboro - - 


148.43 
J 148.43 


2,434.27 

1,820.51 

504.76 


Mount Olive 




40.00 


84.00 


Fremont 




25.00 


Wilkes 

Rural 

North Wilkesboro 


145.50 
145.50 


i 20.28 
; 20.28 


119.80 
108.12 
11.68 
108.16 
108.16 


599.53 
599.53 


1.534.82 

1,473.14 

G1.68 


Wilson- - - - - -- 


71.90 
71.90 




977.52 

944.18 

33.34 


1,921.92 


Rural 


' 


1,813.58 


Wilson City 




108.34 


Lucama 


1 




Yadkin '_ 


248.26 
137.15 


81.55 
140.35 


1 

26.50 


t 107.64 
j 89.88 


4.50 
442.04 


468.45 


Yancey 


809.42 


1 




North Carolina 

Rural 

City 


47,560.99 

41,601.49 

5,959.50 


9,261.77 

9,220.49 

41.28 


! 9,881.11 

9,841.07 

40.04 


13,961.64 

11,924.08 

2,037.56 


43,571.83 

34,450.54 

9,121.29 


' 124,237.34 

107,037.67 

17,199.67 



C. SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



TABLE VIII. 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE BY COUNTIES AND 
TOWNS, 1909-'10. 



This table gives tlie scliuol population, eiiroUuieiit and average daily at- 
tendance, by races, for the several counties and towns, numerically, and also 
the percentage of school population enrolled, percentage of enrollment in aver- 
age daily attendance for the State. 

Summary of Table VIII and Comparison with 190S-'09. 



Total school population, 1909-' 10 

Total school population, 190S-'09 

Increase 

White school population, 1909-'10 

White school population, 1908-09 

Increase 

Colored school population, 1909-' 10 

Colored school population, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Total enrollment, 1909-10 

Total enrollment, 1908-09 

Increase 

White enrollment, 1909-10 

White enrollment, 1908-09 

Increase 

Colored enrollment, 1909-10 

Colored enrollment, 1908-09 

Increase 

Total average daily attendance, 1909-10 

Total average daily attendance, 1908-09 

Increase 

White average daily attendance, 1909-10 

AVhite average daily attendance, 1908-09 

Increase 

Colored average daily attendance, 1909-10 

Colored average daUy attendance, 1908-09 

Incr^pase 

Percentage of school population enrolled, 1909-10. 



Rural. 



605,672 

598,657 

7,015 

416,251 

410,659 

5,592 

189,421 

187.998 

1,433 

442,044 

442,935 

*891 

306,859 

307,908 

*1,049 

135,185 

135,027 

158 

277,109 

280,794 

*3,685 

196,527 

201,288 

*4,761 

80,582 

79.506 

1,076 

72.9 



City. 

129,496 

128,908 

588 

80,826 

80,051 

775 I 
48,670 
48,857 
*187 
78,360 
78,267 
93 
53,262 
52,867 
395 
25,098 
25,400 , 
*302 1 
54,226 
55,175 
*949 
39,345 • 
39,591 
*246 
14.881 i 
15,584 
*703 
60.5 



North 
Carolina. 



735,168 

727,565 

7,603 

497,077 

490,710 

6.367 

238,091 

236,855 

1,236 

520,404 

521,202 

*798 

360,121 

360,775 

*654 

160,283 

160,427 

*144 

331,335 

335,969 

*4,634 

235.872 

240,879 

*5,007 

95.463 

95,090 

373 

70.8 



♦Decrease. 



176 



School Attexdaxce^ 1900-'] 0. 



Summary of Table VIII and Comparison with 1908-'09 — Continued. 



Rural. 



City. 



Percentage of school population enrolled, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Percentage of white school population enrolled, 1909-'10- 

Percentage of white school population enrolled, 1908-09. ' 

Increase 

Percentage of colored school population enrolled, 

1909-'10. 
Percentage of colored school population enrolled, 

1908-09. 

Increase 

Percentage of enrollment in average daily attendance, ' 

1909-'10. 
Percentage of enrollment in average daily attendance, 

1908-09. 

Increase 



Percentage of white enrollment in average daily attend- 
ance, 1909-10. 

Percentage of white enrollment in average daily attend- 
ance, 1908-09. 

Increase 



Percentage of colored enrollment in average daily at- 
tendance, 1909-10. 

Percentage of colored enrollment in average daily at- 
tendance, 1908-09. 

Increase 



73.9 

*1.0 

73.7 

74.9 

*1.2 

71.4 

71.8 
* 4 

62.7 
63.3 
*.6 
64.0 
65.3 
*1.3 
59.6 
58.8 
.8 



60.7 

*.2 
65.9 
66.0 

*.l 
51.6 
51.9 

*.3 
69.2 
70.4 
*1.2 
73.9 
74.8 

*.9 
59.3 
61.3 
*2.0 



North 
Carolina. 



71.5 

*.7 
72.4 
73.3 

*.9 
67.3 
67.7 

*.4 
63.7 
64.4 

*.7 
65.5 
66.7 
*1.2 
59.5 
59.2 
.3 




Alamance 

Rural 

Burlington ___ 

Graham - 

Haw River 

Mebane 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Rural 

Wadesboro 

Ashe i 

Beaufort 

Rural 

Washington 

Belhaven 

* Decrease. 



School Attendance^ 1909-'10. 



177 



Table VIII. School Attendance — Continued. 



Bertie 

Rural 

Aulander 

Windsor 

Bladen 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Rural 

Asheville 

Burke 

Rural 

Morganton 

Cabarrus 

Rural 

Concord 

Caldwell 

Rural 

Lenoir 

Granite 

Rhodhiss 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Rural 

Hickory 

Newton 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Rural 

Andrews 

Murphy 

Chowan 

Rural 

Edenton 

Clay 

Part 11—12 



White School 
Population. 


Colored School 
Population. 


Id 
xq 

o o 


White School 
Enrollment. 


Colored School 
Enrollment. 


Total School 
Enrollment. 


White Average 
Daily Attend- 
ance. 


Colored Aver- 
age Daily 
Attendance. 


Total Average 
Daily Attend- 
ance. 


3,261 


4,712 


7,973 


2,575 


3,480 


6,055 


1,728 


2,051 


3,779 


2,890 


4,455 


7,345 


2,259 


3,267 


5,526 


1,460 


1,900 


3.360 


167 





167 


131 





131 


85 




85 


204 


257 


461 


185 


213 


398 


183 


151 


334 


3,177 


3,196 


6,373 


1,837 


2,350 


4,187 


1,173 


1,598 


2.771 


2,636 


1,775 


4,411 


2,271 


1,768 


4,039 


1,214 


986 


2.200 


14,183 


3,117 


17,300 


10,511 


1,621 


12,132 


6,600 


1,076 


7,676 


9,846 


947 


10,793 


7,722 


734 


8,456 


4,605 


448 


5,053 


4,337 


2,170 


6,507 


2,789 


887 


3,676 


1,995 


628 


2,623 


6,059 


1,015 


7,074 


3,363 


513 


3,876 


2,249 


350 


2,599 


■ 4,985 


663 


5,648 


2,750 


380 


3,130 


1,728 


272 


• 2,000 


1,074 


352 


1,426 


613 


133 


746 


521 


78 


599 


6,683 


2,288 


8,971 


4,457 


1,438 


5,895 


2,953 


853 


3,806 


^ 4,515 


1,671 


6,186 


3,139 


1,112 


4,251 


2,010 


643 


2,653 


2,168 


617 


2,785 


1,318 


326 


1,644 


943 


210 


1,153 


6,364 


650 


7,014 


4,499 


422 


4,921 


2,983 


249 


3.232 


5,061 


367 


5,428 


3,599 


210 


3,809 


2,355 


128 


2,483 


808 


283 


1,091 


572 


212 


784 


414 


121 


535 


264 




264 


224 




224 


157 




157 


231 




231 


104 




104 


57 





57 


1,141 


860 


2,001 


992 


613 


1,605 


703 


321 


1,024 


3,461 


714 


4,175 


1,682 


177 


1,859 


1,140 


100 


1,240 


2,617 


2,825 


5,442 


1,525 


1,677 


3,202 


921 


1,122 


2,043 


8,775 


1,374 


10,149 


5,870 


824 


6,694 


4,184 


513 


4,697 


6,852 


819 


7,671 


4,828 


539 


5,367 


3,425 


359 


3,784 


1,005 


411 


1,416 


621 


200 


821 


470 


90 


560 


918 


144 


1,062 


421 


85 


506 


289 


64 


353 


4,781' 


2,911 


7,692 


3,639 


2.129 


5,768 


2,582 


1,346 


3,928 


5,637 


96 


5,733 


3,786 


92 


3,878 


2,462 


85 


2.547 


4,655 


96 


4,751 


3,000 


92 


3,092 


2,000 


85 


2.085 


518 




518 


518 




518 


327 




327 


464 




464 


268 




268 


135 




135 


1,643 


1,844 


3,487 


1,209 


1,310 


2,519 


837 


809 


1,646 


1,142 


1,703 


2,845 


860 


1,230 


2,090 


575 


762 


1,337 


1 501 


141 


642 


349 


80 


429 


262 


47 


309 


1,4.35 


G.i 


1,500 


1,093 


55 


1,148 


737 


25 


762 



178 



School Attendance^ 1909-' 10. 



Table VIII. School Attendance — Continued. 



Cleveland 

Rural 

Shelby 

Kings Mountain. 

Columbus 

Craven 

Rural 

New Bern 

Cumberland 

Rural 

Fayetteville 

Hope Mills 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Rural 

Lexington 

Thomasville 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Rural 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Rural 

Tarboro 

Forsyth 

Rural 

Winston 

Kernersville 

Franklin 

Rural 

Franklinton 

Louisburg 

Youngsville 



o 
o _• 

So- 



8,156 

6,886 

738 

532 

6,190 

3,308 

2,261 

1,047 

6,813 

5,058 

1,240 

515 

1.810 

1,500 

8,268 

6,728 

917 

623 

3,595 

4,994 

7,118 

3,865 

3,253 

3,167 

2,248 

919 

10,377 

7,143 

2,912 

322 

4,191 

3,317 

289 

335 

250 



o 
o 

" s 

CO .2 
<» — 

So. 
o o 
OPh 



1,755 
1,529 
156 
70 
3,204 
4,491 
2,595 
1,896 
5,512 
4,163 
1,349 



1,047 

169 

1,154 

711 

206 

237 

856 

3,119 

4,280 

2,228 

2,052 

5,860 

4,529 

1,331 

4,484 

1,942 

2,433 

109 

4,550 

3,170 

512 

610 

258 



o • 
o c 
xi o 

o o 



9,911 

8,415 

894 

602 

9,394 

7,799 

4,856 

2,943 

12,325 

9,221 

2,589 

515 

2,857 

1,669 

9,422 

7,439 

1,123 

860 

4,451 

8,113 

11,398 

6,093 

5,305 

9,027 

6,777 

2,250 

14,861 

9,085 

5,345 

431 

8,741 

6,487 

801 

945 

508 



o . 
si a 
ccg 

<D — 



5,889 

5,054 

487 

348 

4,646 

2,752 

1,936 

816 

5,180 

4,151 

729 

300 

1,408 

1,069 

5,986 

4,913 

661 

412 

2,410 

3,820 

4,524 

2,3.39 

2,185 

2,187 

1,614 

573 

6,499 

4,607 

1,661 

231 

3,168 

2,465 

244 

256 

203 



o 
o 

CO S 
o c 



1,110 

960 

93 

57 

2,255 

2,790 

1,984 

806 

4,452 

3,939 

513 



687 

105 

863 

526 

191 

146 

649 

2,439 

2,549 

1,236 

1,313 

3,405 

2,769 

636 

2,328 

1,107' 

1,138 

83 

2,521 

1,890 

284 

212 

135 



o c 






6,999 

6,014 

580 

405 

6,901 

5,542 

3,920 

1,622 

9,632 

8,190 

1,242 

300 

2,095 

1,174 

6,849 

5,439 

852 

558 

3,059 

6,259 

7,073 

3,575 

3,498 

5,592 

4,383 

1,209 

8,827 

5,714 

2,799 

314 

5,689 

4,355 

528 

468 

338 



^^ 



>?6 



a; 
o <u 



3,746 

3,080 

442 

224 

2,808 

1,819 

1,171 

648 

3,688 

2,908 

562 

218 

943 

625 

3,828 

3,001 

551 

276 

1,486 

2,425 

3,034 

1,410 

1,624 

1,314 

902 

412 

4,070 

1 

2,653 \ 
1,259 I 
158 I 
1,992 
1,517 
175 
178 
122 



622 

511 

78 

33 

1,396 

1,497 

1,075 

422 
2,742 
2,408 

334 



358 

73 

509 

280 

152 

77 

314 

1,450 

1.382 

496 

886 

1,660 

1,314 

346 

1,201 

584 

573 

44 

1,467 

1,197 

131 

68 

71 



CD 1 

(-1 (D 



HO is 



4,368 

3,591 

520 

257 

4,404 

3,316 

2,246 

1,070 

6,430 

5,316 

896 

218 

1,301 

698 

4,337 

3,281 

703 

353 

1,800 

3,875 

4,416 

1,906 

2,510 

2,974 

2,210 

758 

5,271 

3,237 

1,832 

202 

3,459 

2,714 

306 

246 

193 



School .Vttendance^ 1909-'10. 



179 



Table VIII. School Attendance — Continued. 



Gaston 

Rural 

Gastonia 

Cherry ville 

Gates 

Graham ^ 

Granville 

Rural 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford 

Rural 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Guilford College. 

Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck . _ 

Weldon . . 

Enfield 

Roanoke Rapids- 

Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville- . 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville 

Statesville 



o 
c ^ 

•^ 5 



10,796 
8,713 
1,504 

579 
1,940 
1,714 
4,114 
3,547 

567 
2,213 
13,901 
9,094 
2,514 
2,118 

175 
4,107 
2,422 

419 

361 

330 

575 
5,637 
5,169 

468 
5,815 
5,194 

621 
4,999 
4,498 

501 
2,187 
1,649 
8,853 
6,795 

978 
1,080 



X.5 
o o 



2,991 

2,535 

456 



1,941 

*47 

4,367 

3,501 

856 

2,057 

4,833 

2,576 

1,653 

604 



7,859 

6,734 

190 

407 

434 

94 

2,336 

2,336 



234 



234 

700 

403 

297 

3,208 

1,442 

2,704 

2,203 

222 

279 



o ■ 
o s 

J^ o 

o o 



13,787 

11,248 

1,960 

579 

3,881 

1,761 

8,471 

7,048 

1,423 

4,270 

18,734 

11,670 

4,167 

2,722 

175 

11,966 

9,156 

609 

768 

764 

669 

7,973 

7,505 

468 

6,049 

5,194 

855 

5,699 

4,901 

798 

5,395 

3,091 

11,557 

8,998 

1,200 

1,359 



o . 
Si c 

^1 



6,720 

5,469 

888 

363 

1,399 

1,171 

2,978 

2,579 

399 

1,616 

9,777 

6,602 

1,877 

1,146 

152 

2,697 

1,565 

300 

266 

230 

336 

4,032 

3,606 

426 

4,343 

3,777 

566 

3,429 

2,908 

521 

1,300 

1,145 

6,629 

5,349 

583 

697 



o 
o 

o c 



2,166 

1,819 

347 



1,358 

23 

2,813 

2,485 

328 

1,649 

2,646 

1,803 

486 

357 



4,439 

3,718 

171 

224 

245 

81 

1,437 

1,437 



160 



160 

471 

301 

170 

2,340 

1,053 

1,877 

1,500 

167 

210 



xi 5 



CA} 



^S 



52 

o c 



7,288 

1,235 

363 

2,757 

1,194 

5,791 

5,064 

727 

3,265 

12,423 

8,405 

2,363 

1,503 

152 

7,136 

5,283 

471 

490 

475 

417 

5,469 

5,043 

426 

4,503 

3,777 

726 

3,900 

3,209 

691 

3,640 

2,198 

8,506 

6,849 

750 

907 



0) 



4,133 

3,271 

590 

272 

993 

625 

1,937 

1,613 

324 

908 

6,646 

4,232 

1,447 

847 

120 

1,779 

898 

280 

206 

192 

203 

2,646 

2,321 

325 

2,649 

2,279 

370 

2,222 

1,824 

398 

804 

774 

4,316 

3,353 

405 

558 



> 



o ai 



1,218 
1,031 

187 



> *^ 
« 



783 

17 

1,569 

1,342 

227 

726 

1,688 

1,156 

351 

181 



2,402 

2,018 

135 

98 

123 

28 

1,437 

1,437 



105 



105 
252 
117 
135 

1,206 
729 

1,141 
897 
102 
142 



5,351 
4,302 

777 
, 272 
1,776 

642 
3,506 
2,955 

551 
1,634 
8,334 
5,388 
1.798 
1,028 

120 
4,181 
2,916 

415 

304 

315 

231 
4,083 
3.758 

325 
2,754 
2.279 

475 
2,474 
1,941 

533 
2,010 
1,503 
5,457 
4,250 

507 

700 



♦Indians. 



180 



School Attendance^ 1909-'10. 



Table VIII. School Attendance — Continued. 



Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

Smithfield 

Jones 

Lee 

Rural 

Sanford 

Lenoir 

Rural _. 

Kinston 

LaGrange 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincolnton 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Rural 

Williamston - . . 
Robersonville - 

McDowell 

Rural 

Marion 

Mecklenburg 

Rural 

Charlotte 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Rural 

Troy 

Moore 

Rural 

Carthage 

Southern Pines 



White School 
Population. 


Colored School 
Population. 


Total School 
Population. 


4.165 


219 


1 
4,384 i 


10,799 


3,916 


14,715 


9,935 


3,349 


13,284 


459 


270 


729 


405 


297 


702 


1,508 


1.490 


2,998 


2,638 


1,254 


3,892 


1,960 


1,254 


3.214 


678 




678 


4,044 


3,048 


7,092 


2,313 


1,801 


4,114 


1,368 


893 


2,261 


363 


354 


717 


5,789 


1,143 


6,932 


5,038 


848 


5,886 


751 


295 


1,046 


3,773 


209 


3,982 


7,834 


163 


7,997 


2,931 


3,068 


5,999 


2,457 


2,642 


5,099 


253 


319 


572 


221 


107 


328 


5,239 


400 


5,639 


4,773 


400 


5,173 


466 




466 


12,583 


8,722 


21,305 


6,737 


5,480 


12,217 


5,846 


3,242 


9,088 


5,680 


87 


5,767 


3,869 


1,360 


5,229 1 


3,519 


1.147 


4,666 


350 


213 


563 


4,171 


2,206 


6,377 


3,772 


2,192 


5,964 


307 




307 


92 


14 


106 



o . 

.CI a. 



3,106 
8,376 
7,688 

375 

313 
1,068 
2,077 
1,566 

511 
2,936 
1.811 

887 

238 
3,525 
3,090 

435 
2,933 
5,768 
2,630 
2,190 

221 

219 
3,576 
3,249 

327 
9.137 
5,525 
3.612 
4.850 
2.657 
2.453 

204 
3,237 
2,907 

236 
94 



o 

o 

CO <a 

2, <-< 

o c 



194 

2,486 

2,126 

165 

195 

1,172 

959 

959 



2,263 

1,547 

528 

188 

825 

631 

194 

125 

93 

2,222 

1,947 

219 

56 

202 

202 



-Si 

CO c 
■=5 2 



5.394 

3,504 

1,890 

51 

978 

803 

175 

1,278 

1,264 



14 



3,300 

10,862 

9,814 

540 

508 
2,240 
3,036 
2,525 

511 
5,199 
3,358 
1,415 

426 
4,350 
3,721 

629 
3,058 
5,861 
4,852 
4,137 

440 

275 
3,778 
3,451 

327 
14,531 
9,029 
5,502 
4,901 
3,635 
3,256 

379 
4,515 
4,171 

236 

108 



ID aj 
>-^ 

<< 
^0 3 



2,014 

4,757 

4,270 

300 

187 

628 

1,398 

1,014 

384 

2,047 

1,215 

660 

172 

2,447 

2,097 

350 

1,952 

3,584 

1,952 

1,667 

145 

140 

2,646 

2,393 

253 

6,786 

4,144 

2,642 

4,002 

1,741 

1,609 

132 

2,013 

1,788 

165 

60 



O <D 



U 1 

« 



93 

1,429 

1.236 

67 

126 

711 

580 

580 



1.085 

733 

252 

100 

486 

361 

125 

88 

53 

1,461 

1,290 

145 

26 

140 

140 



3,313 

2,233 

1.080 

39 

959 

809 

150 

797 

1,785 






12 



2,107 
6,186 
5,506 

367 

313 
1,339 
1,978 
1,594 

384 
3,132 
1,948 

912 

272 
2,933 
2,458 

475 
2,040 
3,637 
3,413 
2,957 

290 

166 
2,786 
2,533 

253 
10,099 
6,377 
3,722 
4,041 
2,700 
2,418 

282 
2,810 
2,573 

165 
72 



School Attendance^ 1909-'10. 



181 



Table VIII. School Attendance — Continued. 



Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount 

New Hanover 

Rural 

Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 

Person 

Rural 

Roxboro 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville 

Polk 

Randolph 

Rural 

Ashboro 

Randleman 

Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham 

Hamlet 

Robeson 

Rural 

Lumberton 

Maxton 

*1,976 are Croatans 






o 



5,785 
4,522 
1,263 
3,956 

828 
3,128 
2,825 
3,185 
3,003 
2,128 
1,249 
2,223 
1,744 
1,514 

230 
3,366 
3,003 

363 
6,820 
6,320 

500 
2,145 
8,805 
7,495 

492 

818 
3,195 
2,433 

450 

312 
7,946 
7,276 

440 

230 



o 
o 

a3.2 

o o 
OPm 



4,122 
3,096 
1,026 
3,737 

931 
2,806 
3,941 
1,524 
1,834 
1,338 
1,353 
2,579 
1,772 
1,593 

179 
2,465 
2,347 

118 
6,358 
5,640 

718 

421 
1,248 
1,060 

188 



3,150 

2,742 

292 

116 



8d 

o o 



o . 



9,907 

7,618 

2,289 

7,693 

1,759 

5,934 

6,766 

4,709 

4,837 

3,466 

2,602 

4,802 

3,516 

3,107 

409 

5,831 

5,350 

481 

13,178 

11,960 

1,218 

2,566 

10,053 

8,555 

680 

818 

6,345 

5,175 

742 

428 



7,308 I 15,254 



6,828 
290 
190 



*14,104 
730 
420 



4,591 
3,670 

921 
2,874 

606 
2,268 
2,308 
2,604 
2,213 
1,811 

904 
1,665 
1,281 
1,069 

212 
2,332 
1,998 

334 
5,858 
5,410 

448 
1,392 
6.343 
5,459 

438 

446 
2,172 
1,594 

303 

275 
5,539 
5,005 

368 

166 



o 
o . 

•V S 



2,724 
.2,287 

437 
2,121 

694 
1,427 
3,102 
1,152 
1,055 

906 

819 
1,955 
1,536 
1,313 

223 
1,717 
1,509 

208 
2,837 
2,516 

321 

344 
1,499 
1,347 

152 



" a 
ma 

o c 



2,492 

2,181 

165 

146 

6,834 

6,576 

166 

92 



7,315 

5,957 

1,358 

4,995 

1,300 

3,695 

5,410 

3,756 

3.268 

2,717 

1,723 

3.620 

2.817 

2,382 

435 

4,049 

3.507 

542 

8,695 

7,926 

769 

1,736 

7,842 

6,806 

590 

446 

4,664 

3,775 

468 

421 

12,373 

11,581 

534 

258 



<u ■ 

I- G 



2,544 

1,829 

715 

2,171 

375 

1,796 

1,352 

1,644 

1,435 

1,133 

573 

1.145 

871 

700 

171 

1,451 

1,175 

276 

4,475 

4,105 

370 

680 

4,557 

3,962 

313 

282 

1,409 

960 

272 

177 

3.691 

3,279 

276 

136 



u 

o <u 
o bu'i 



1.332 

.1.087 

245 

1,235 
393 
842 

1,508 
746 
616 
567 
451 

1,166 
919 
769 
150 
910 
800 
110 

2,090 

1,900 
190 
260 
631 
510 
121 



1.274 

1,073 

123 

78 

3,895 

3,718 

104 

73 



« 



HQ5 



3,876 

2,916 

960 

3,406 

768 

2,638 

2,860 

2,390 

2,051 

1,700 

1,024 

2.311 

1.790 

1.469 

321 

2.361 

1.975 

386 

6.565 

6,005 

560 

940 

5.188 

4.472 

434 

282 

2,683 

2,033 

395 

255 

7,586 

6,997 

380 

209 



182 



School ATTEXDA:srcE, 1909-'10. 



Table VIII. School Attendance — Continued. 



o 

o ■ 

■^ S 



o 
o 

^ r-" 

o o 

OPh 



o ■ 
o s 
.c o 



o o 



o . 



o 
o 

o e 
OH 



Rockingham 8,593 

Rural . ; 7,438 

Reidsville 1,155 

Rowan 9,575 

Rural.'- 8,057 

Salisbury 1,518 

Rutherford 7,229 

Sampson 5,298 

Rural 4,934 

Clinton 364 

Scotland 2,476 

Rural 1,880 

Laurinburg 596 

Stanly 5,890 

Rural 4,644 

Albemarle 1,246 

Stokes 6,292 

Surry 9,477 

Rural 8,306 

Mount Airy 1 , 171 

Swain 3,166 

Transylvania t 2,133 



Tyrrell- ----- 

Union 

Rural 

Monroe 

Vance 

Rural 

Henderson - 

Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington - 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth - 



1,095 

7,952 

7,161 

791 

3,044 

1,671 

1,373 

11,772 

7,580 

4,192 

2,252 

1,771 

1,295 

190 

286 



3,945 

2,842 

1,103 

3,015 

2,269 

746 

1,659 

3,366 

2,961 

405 

3,026 

2,655 

371 

735 

735 



1,015 

716 

299 

204 

260 

607 

3,458 

3,119 

339 

3,814 

2,584 

1,230 

9,407 

5,757 

3,650 

4,386 

1,910 

1,234 

310 

366 



12,538 
10,280 
2,258 j 
12,590 

10,326 ! 

I 
2,264 j 

8,888 

8,664 

7,895 

769 

5,502 

4,535 

967 

6,625 

5,379 

1,246 

7,280 

10,492 

9,022 

1,470 

3,370 

2,393 

1,702 

11,410 

10,280 

1,130 

6,858 

4,255 

2,603 

21,179 

13,337 

7,842 

6,638 

3,681 

2,529 

500 

652 



6,014 
5,364 

650 
6,807 
5,831 

976 
5,521 
5,648 
5,355 

293 
1,761 
1,378 

383 
4,378 
4,073 

305 
4,684 
6,838 
6,148 

690 
2,580 
1,545 
1,017 
6,837 
6,161 

676 
2,198 
1,460 

738 
7,736 
5,628 
?,108 
1,269 
1,270 

850 

174 

246 



3,306 

2,760 

546 

2,003 

1,635 

368 

1,039 

3,119 

2,731 

388 

2,369 

2,086 

283 

372 

372 



506 

733 

593 

140 

90 

80 

585 

2,441 

2,191 

250 

2,163 

1,571 

592 

5,652 

4,444 

1,208 

3,145 

1,293 

926 

160 

207 



■Si 






ill 



9,320 
8,124 
1,196 
8,810 
7,466 
1,344 
6,560 
8,767 
8,086 

681 
4,130 
3,464 

666 
4,750 
A Mo 

305 
5,190 
7,571 
6,741 

830 
2,670 
1,625 
1,592 
9,278 
8,352 

926 
4,361 
3,031 
1,330 
13,388 
10,072 
3,316 
4,414 
2,563 
1,776 

334 

453 



4,088 

3,503 

585 

4,586 

3,896 

690 

3,490 

3,611 

3,402 

209 

1,257 

1,004 

253 

2,534 

2,297 

237 

2,465 

4,192 

3,738 

454 

1,289 

972 

512 

4,309 

3,784 

525 

1,632 

1,110 

522 

4,615 

3,166 

1,449 

771 

990 

695 

112 

183 



oS<J 



0) I 
03 C 



« 



1,938 

1,600 

338 

1,246 

1,016 

230 

581 

2,012 

1,776 

236 

1,539 

1,390 

149 

250 

250 



237 

361 

305 

56 

46 

41 

181 

1,464 

1,343 

121 

1,312 

997 

315 

3,160 

2,172 

988 

1,774 

670 

510 

64 

96 






6,026 
5.103 

923 
5,832 
4,912 

920 
4,071 
5,623 
5,178 

445 
2.796 
2,394 

402 
2,784 
2,547 

237 
2,702 
4,553 
4,043 

510 
1.335 
1.01.5 

693 
5,773 
5.127 

645 
2,944 
2.107 

837 
7,775 
5,338 
2,437 
2,545 
1,660 
1.205 

176 

279 



School AttendajStce^ 1909-'10. 



183 



Table VIII. School Attendance — Continued. 



Watauga 

Wayne 

Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive 

Fremont 

Wilkes 

Rural 

North Wilkesboro- 

Wilson -. 

Rural 

Wilson City 

Lucama 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

North Carolina 

Rural 

City • 



o 

^0. 



4,996 
6,607 
4,428 
1,550 

360 

269 
9,804 
9,319 

485 
5,053 
3,811 
1,034 

208 
4,850 
4,399 



497,077 

416,251 

80,826 



o 
o 

%^ 
°P 

OP4 



90 
4,853 
2,896 
1,406 

366 

185 
1,013 

914 

99 

4,420 

2,551 

1,775 

94 

433 
95 



238,091 

189,421 

48,670 



o • 
o c 
•^ 2 
Ma 

3l 

o o 



5,086 

11,460 

7,324 

2,956 

726 

454 

10,817 

10,233 

584 

9,473 

6,362 

2,809 

302 

5,283 

4,494 



735,168 
605,672 
129,496 



o . 



3,853 

5,413 

3,775 

1,055 

330 

253 

7,462 

7,135 

327 

3,646 

2,762 

721 

163 

3,705 

3,260 



360,121 

306,859 

53,262 



o 
o 

^« 

O " 



65 

3,715 

2,319 

915 

328 

153 

864 

775 

89 

2,556 

1,989 

483 

84 

305 

50 



160,283 

135,185 

25,098 



cc_c 

"3 2 

o c 



3,918 
9,128 
6,094 
1,970 

658 

406 
8,326 
7,910 

416 
6,202 
4,751 
1,204 

247 
4,010 
3,310 



W) J, 






520,404 

442,044 

78,360 



2,426 

3,365 

2,180 

792 

228 

165 

4,290 

4,047 

243 

2,124 

1,548 

499 

77 

2,342 

1,708 






235,872 

196,527 

39,345 



45 

2,034 

1,308 

422 

225 

79 
496 
428 

68 

1,148 

906 

202 

40 
190 

41 






HP eS 



95,463 
80,582 
14,881 



2,471 

5,399 

3,488 

1,214 

453 

244 

4,786 

4,475 

311 

3,272 

2,454 

701 

117 

2,532 

1,749 



331,335 

277,109 

54,226 



D. SALARIES OF TEACHERS AND LENGTH OF SCHOOL TERM. 



TABLE IX. SALARIES AND TERM, 1909-'10. 

This table shows, by races, the total number of teachers, the school term 
ill days, the whole auuual amount paid teachers, the average annual amount 
paid each teacher. 

Summary of Table IX and Compaeison with 1908-'09. 



Rural. 


City. 


North 
Carolina. 


9,440 


1,722 


11,162 


9,370 


1,587 


10,957 


70 


135 


205 


7,047 


1,322 


8,369 


6,926 


1,203 


8,129 


121 


119 


240 


2,393 


400 


2,793 


2.444 


384 


2,828 


*51 


16 


*35 


$ 1,355,579.03 


S 595,574.24 


$1,951,153.27 


1,264,955.76 


543,076.95 


1,808,032.71 


90,623.27 


52,497.29 


, 143,120.56 


1,126,059.83 


494,593.13 


1,620,652.96 


1,037,442.78 


449,555.48 


1,486,998.26 


88,617.05 


45,037.65 


133,664.70 


229,519.20 


100,981.11 


330,500.31 


227,512.98 


93,521.47 


321,034.45 


2,006.22 


7,459.64 


9,465.86 


143.60 


345.86 


174.80 


135.00 


342.07 


165.02 


8.60 


3.79 


9.78 


159.79 


374.12 


193.65 


149.81 


373.69 


182.93 


9.98 


.43 


10.72 


$ 95.91 


$ 252.45 


$ 118.33 


93.09 


240.94 


113.52 


2.82 


11.51 


4.81 


89.9 


172.8 


101.9 


89.6 


172.3 


101.3 


.3 


.5 


.6 



Total number of teacliers, 1909-10 

Total number of teacliers, 1908-09 

Increase 

White teachers, 1909-' 10 

White teachers, 1908-09-- 

Increase- 

Colored teachers, 1909-10 

Colored teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

Amount paid all teachers, 1909-10- 

Amount paid all teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

Amount paid white teachers, 1909-' 10 

Amount paid white teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

Amount paid colored teachers, 1909-10 

Amount paid colored teachers, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Average annual amount paid each teacher, 1909-'10 
Average annual amount paid each teacher, 1908-09 

Increase 

Average annual amount paid each white teacher, 

1909-10. 
Average annual amount paid each white teacher, 

1908-'09. 

Increase 

Average annual amount paid each colored teacher, 

1909-'10. 
Average annual amount paid each colored teacher, 

1908-09. 

Increase 

Average term of all schools (in days), 1909-10 

Average term of all schools (in days), 1908-09 

Increase 

♦Decrease. 




C5 

o 



M 
o 



o 

a" 



Z 
a 

33 

o 






O 
> 



o 



O 

o 

K 
o 
as 



►J 

3 



Salaries and Teem^ 1909-'10. 



185 



Table IX. Salaries and Term — Coniinued. 





Rural. 


City. 


North 
Carolina. 


Average term of white schools (in days), 1909-10--- 

Average term of white schools (in days), 1908-'09-.- 

Increase-- - - 


92.7 
92.7 

.0 
81.7 
81.2 

.5 

% 31.94 

30.12 

1.82 

34.47 

32.32 

2.15 

23.48 

22.92 

.56 


175.2 
175.8 
'*.6 
164.8 
161,3 
3.5 
$ 40.03 
39.82 
.21 
42.72 
42.50 
.22 
30.64 
29.87 
.77 


104.6 
105.0 

* 4 


Average term of colored schools (in days), 1909-10- - 

Average term of colored schools (in days), 1908-09-- 

Increase _ - -- - -- 


93.7 

91.9 

1.8 


Average monthly salary paid all teachers, 1909-10-- 

Average monthly salary paid all teachers, 1908-09-- 

Increase . - -- 


$ 34.30 

32.58 

1.72 


Average monthly salary paid white teachers, 1909-10 

Average monthly salary paid white teachers, 1908-'09 

Increase - 


37.02 

34.80 

2.22 


Average monthly salary paid colored teachers, 

1909-10. 
Average monthly salary paid colored teachers, 

1908-'09. 

Increase-- - 


25.26 

24.70 

.56 







White. 



Alamance 

Rural 

Burlington- - 

Graham 

Haw River-. 

Mebane 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Rural 

Wadesboro., 

Ashe 

Beaufort 

Rural 

Washington- 
Belhaven 

♦Decrease 









g W m 



125 

84 

20 

10 

6 

5 

64 

54 

62 

52 

10 

118 

114 

83. 

25 

6 



99 

71 
180 
120 
140 
160 

80 

76 
101 

90 
158 

80 
106 

85 
165 
160 



m M 






' ><i 



<s. 



c«i 



+3 w 

S c3 i; 



^ c^ . 

Q) +j a> tH 

tU fl o 

> E C3 i^ 



91 



146 



115 



120 



124 



21,163. 

8,649. 

6,979. 

3,155. 

1,400. 
980. 

8,329. 

6,010. 
11,079. 

8,079. 

3,000. 
11,265. 
21,638. 
11,505 

8,772 

J, 361 



$169.81 
102.97 
348.95 
315.52 
233.33 
196.00 
130.14 
115.31 
178.69 
155.34 
300.00 
95.47 
189.80 
138.61 
350.88 
226.83 



Colored. 






> _ 



34 

27 

2 

2 

1 

2 

6 

3 

43 

40 

3 

10 

45 

36 

7 

2 



87 

71 

180 

120 

120 

160 

82 

76 

88 

83 

158 

80 

89 

71 

165 

160 



S y " 



81 






^ ci . 
tu e o 

> S c3 tH 



90 



3,566.86 

2,399.66 

450.00 

446.75 

130.45 

440.00 

663.20 

264.00 

4,216.00 

3,676.00 

540.00 j 

483.62 ! 

5,630.86 

3,408.36 

1,742.50 

480.00 



$113.70 

88.87 
225.00 

60.00 
130.45 
220.00 
110.53 

88.00 
9.02 

91.90 
180.00 

48.36 
125.13 

94.67 
248.92 
240.00 



186 



Salaries and Tekm. 1909-'10. 



Table IX. Salabies and Tekm — Continued. 



White. 



Colored. 



3 





s 




<V 




H 






k^ 


P w 


<U 


M>, 


.C 


e3 c3 




s3 


(11 


> ^ 


H 


<h 



'- (-1 



o'rt jr 

hPh5 



Bertie 

Rural 

Windsor 

Aulander- _ 

Bladen 

Brunswick - . 
Buncombe, - 

Rural 

Asheville_- 

Burke 

Rural 

Morganton_ 

Cabarrus 

Rural 

Concord 

Caldwell 

Rural 

Lenoir 

Granite , 

Rhodhiss _ . 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Rural 

Hickory 

Newton 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Rural 

Andrews.-. 

Murphy 

Chowan 

Rural 

Edenton 



84 i 



73 
6 

5 

79 

46 

202 

136 

66 

74 

61 

13 

103 

. 76 

27 

109 

87 

14 

6 

2 

25 

33 

38 

132 

111 

13 

8 

^5 

93 

74 

14 

5 

29 

21 

8 



99 

90 

160 

160 



143 



90 


132 


80 


130 


139 




114 


151 


190 




105 




94 




160 




108 




90 


141 


160 




98 




82 




180 




140 




81 




100 


152 


83 


158 


80 


107 


98 




86 


110 


160 




160 





80 


110 


101 




86 


114 


160 




160 




116 




91 




180 





^ 3 _ 



cSl 



S 11,953.55 

9,993.55 

1,220.00 

740.00 

9,364.74 

6,275.06 

62,097.18 

26,185.50 

35,911.68 

12,592.84 

8,714.09 

3,878.75 

20,868.95 

11,758.50 

9,110.45 

16,153.65 

9,653.15 

5,098.00 

882.50 

520.00 

3,895.33 

9,534.89 

5,669.50 

20,242.64 

14,872.64 

3,612.50 

1,757.50 

12,277.87 

16,719.54 

11,125.54 

4,274.00 

1,320.00 

6,541.72 

3,391.72 

3,1.50.00 



$142.30 

136 89 

203.33 

148.00 

118.54 

136.41 

307.41 

192.54 

I 544.11 

j 170.17 

' 142.85 

} 298.36 

] 202.61 

154.71 

[ 337.41 

148.19 

110.95 

364.14 

147.08 

260.00 

155.81 

288.93 

149.19 

153.35 

i 133.99 

277.88 

219.68 

144.44 

179.78 

150.35 

305.28 

, 264.00 

i 225.57 

j 161.51 

393.75 



0) 5 



S 

a> 

H 






-t-3 CD 



<B \<SS 



60 : 81 . 

56 76 L 

4 , 160 L 



47 
23 
33 
17 
16 
12 

9 

3 

28 
22 

6 
16 
13 

3 



12 

5 

39 

21 

16 

3 

2 

39 

4 

3 

1 



23 

22 

1 



H^^ 



>- O 

« 



75 
75 

133 
80 

190 
98 
75 

160 
97 
78 

160 
79 
76 
97 



100 



100 



120 



S 5,655.22 

5,205.22 

450.00 



69 

71 

80 

92 

79 

160 !_ 
140 I. 

79 '. 
100 . 

80 I. 
80 L 



107 



3,005.85 

2,494.41 

7,727.13 

1,383.75 

6,343.38 

1,578.18 

918.18 

660.00 

3,408.92 

1,890.17 

1,518.75 

1,568.50 

1,162.75 

405.75 






91 

87 
180 



995.48 
467.75 
3,385.04 
2,234.85 
1,326.10 
648.75 i 
200.00 : 
3,620.65 j 
400 00 
MO. 00 ! 
100 00 



i 99.25 

92 94 

112 .-lO 



63.99 
108.45 
233.85 

81.39 
396.46 
131.51 
102.02 
220.00 
121.74 

85.91 
253.12 

98.03 

89.44 
135.25 



82.95 

93.55 

86.79 

106.42 

82.88 

216.25 

130.00 

92.84 

100.00 

100.00 

100 00 



2,500.60 108.28 

2,275.60 j 103.43 

225.00 ' 225.00 



Salaries and Tkrm. 1909-'10. 



18* 



Table IX. Salaries and Term — Continued. 



White. 



Colored. 





2 aJ 


Average Term 
in Days. | 


Average Term 
in Days, Local- 
tax Districts. 


Total Amount 
Paid Teachers 
for Year. 


Average 
Amount Paid 
ISach Teacher 
for Year. 


Number 
Teachers. 


Average Term 
in Days. 

Average Term 
in Days, Local- 
tax Districts. 


Total Amount 
Paid Teachers 
for Year. 


Average 
Amount Paid 
Bach Teacher 
for Year. 


Clav 


19 
140 


80 
101 


160 


$ 2,064.00 


J108.63 


1 

26 


80 
90 


1 


$ 84.00 
2,369.93 


$ 84.00 


Cleveland 


23,914.46 170.82 


91.11 


Rural - 


119 

12 

9 


91 
160 
160 


137 

1 


17,744.46 ' 149.11 


22 
3 
1 


80 
160 
100 




1,604.93 
640.00 
125.00 


72.95 


Shelby _ - _ _ 


3,400.00 
2,770.00 


283.33 
307.77 


213.33 


Kings Mountain. 


125.00 


Columbus 


121 


93 


126 


25,620.11 


211.73 


40 


76 


120 


4,160.16 


104.01 


Craven 


84 
57 
27 


113 

90 

163 


153 


20,480.05 243.81 

9,568.65 167.87 

10,911.40 404.12 


45 

36 
9 


92 

80 

140 


80 


5, 556. 50 
3,411.50 
2,145.00 


123.47 


Rural . 


94.76 


New Bern 


238.33 


Cumberland 


122 


111 




22,752.82 186.45 


65 


86 




5,081.41 


87.41 


Rural 


101 


101 


144 


16,422.54 162.59 


59 


79 




4,145.52 


70.26 


Fayetteville 


15 


160 




5,254.02 350.26 


6 


160 




1,535.89 


255.98 


Hope Mills 

Currituck 


g 


160 




1 076 26 170 .^7 












44 


93 


108 


7,225.45 


164 .'21 


16 


84 


100 


2,008.55 


125.53 


Dare 


33 


95 


97 


5,148.50 


156.01 


2 


80 




360.00 


180.00 


Davidson 


134 


93 




18,810.77 


147.84 


23 


97 




2,634.45 


114.53 


Rural 


111 


79 


120 


12,353.12 


111.38 


18 


79 




1,494.45 


83.02 


Lexington 


14 


160 




3,930.00 


280.71 


3 


160 




560.00 


186.66 


Thomasville 


9 


160 




2,527.65 


280.85 


2 


160 




580.00 


290.00 


Davie 


54 


93 


138 


6,896.77 


127.71 


11 


80 




1', 330. 98 


120.90 


Duplin ... 


99 

118 
55 
63 


103 
174 
161 
185 


126 
170 


15,554.68 
53,485.85 
19,278.60 
34,207.25 


157.12 
453.27 
350.52 
542.97 


46 
45 
18 
27 


96 
163 
130 
185 


113 
140 


4,012.48 

10,524.81 

2,024.81 

8,500.00 


87.23 


Durham . . 


233.88 


Rural... _ .. 


112.48 


Durham 


314.81 


Edgecombe 


64 


154 




21,014.38 


328.35 


42 


103 




5,439.15 


129.50 


Rural . 


49 
15 


148 
176 


160 


14,948.38 
6,066.00 


305.07 
404.40 


35 
7 


88 
138 




3,959.15 
1,480.00 


113.12 


Tarboro 


211.42 


Forsyth 


156 

109 

42 


123 
101 
176 


132 


38,447.08 
19,647.08 
18,000.00 


246.45 
180.25 
428.57 


41 
24 
15 


121 
101 
155 




7,543.17 
3,298.17 
4,000.00 


183.73 


Rural. ... . . 


137.42 


Winston 


266.66 


Kernersville 


5 


160 




800.00 


160.00 


2 


120 




245.00 


i 122.50 


Franklin 


81 
65 


1 107 
90 


151 


14,803.50 
10,323.50 


182.76 
157.28 


51 
42 


91 
84 


103 


4,912.75 
3,340.75 


96.33 


Rural 


79.54 


Franklinton 


6 


160 




1,480.00 


246.66 


3 


160 




397.00 


132.33 


Louisburg 


6 


180 




2,160,00 


360.00 


4 


140 




900.00 


225.00 


Youngsville 


4 


160 




840.00 


' 210.00 


2 


100 


1 


275.00 


137.50 



188 



Salaries and Tekm^ 1909-'10. 



Table IX. Salaries and Term — Continued. 



White. 



3 ^ 






£ O m 



<J.S <).S5 



3 2 

E cs t: 



SS3 



Colored. 






3^ S u ^ ci 



Gaston.__ — 

Rural 

Gastonia 

Cherry ville 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural 

Oxford--- 

Greene 

Guilford -- 

Rural 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Guilford College - 

Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck . - 

Weldon 

Enfield 

Roanoke Rapids. 

Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

W aynesville 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville.. 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville 

Statesville 



142 

115 

19 

8 

43 

29 

94 

83 

11 

38 

223 

140 

55 

25 

3 

88 

55 

9 

9 

8 

7 

91 

8f 

10 

79 

68 

11 

76 

67 

9 

36 
35 
152 
126 
12 
14 



120 

111 

160 

160 

126 

80 

110 

101 

180 

80 

137 

118 

180 

152 

137 

144 

129 

180 

172 

160 

157 

87 

78 

160 

117 

110 

160 

97 

87 

175 

83 

81 

101 

88 

160 

170 



152 



140 



125 



135 



108 



150 



103 



140 
116 



114 



33,050.05 

24,839.40 

6,530.00 

1,680.65 

5,485.50 

3,091.90 

18,166.00 

14,601.00 

3,565.00 

5,183.60 

63,673.37 

31,371.03 

21,701.09 

9,551.25 

1,050.00 

20,822.54 

10,585.12 

3,555.00 

2,602.42 

2,080.00 

2,000.00 

15,136.16 

12,066.66 

3,069.50 

16,030.00 

12,J30.00 

3,500.00 

12,417.18 

10,208.18 

2,209.00 

5,146.60 

5,032.62 

25,526.36 

16,441.88 

3,793.23 

5,291.25 



$232.74 
215.99 
343.68 
210.08 
127.57 
109.10 
193.25 
175.91 
324.09 
136.41 
285.53 
224.09 
396.38 
382.05 
350.00 

j 

236.62 ' 

192.45 : 

395.00 

289.15 

260.00 

285.00 

166.33 

148.97 

306.95 

137.01 

153.01 

318.18 

163.38 

152.36 

245.44 

142.96 

143.78 

167.93 

130.49 

316.10 

377.94 



36 

32 

4 



13 
1 

48 
43 
5 
25 
55 
35 
10 
10 






s 

H 



74 

64 

160 



85 



*3 tn 

3 ^ 

S rf t; 
<^^ 



^^ . 

> C CS !h 



$ 2,946.36 
1,946.36 
1,000.00 



84 



120 



2,481.66 



96 

86 
180 

80 
123 

95 
180 
166 



102 



110 



5,180.25 
4,145.25 
1,035.00 
1,940.05 
10,483.30 
4,400.20 
3,233.10 
2,850.00 



65 


108 


56 


99 


2 


180 


3 


172 


3 


160 


1 


157 


32 


71 


32 


71 



160 



8,820.96 

6,974.76 

450.00 

621.20 

535.00 

240.00 

1,844.21 

1,844.21 



728.00 



3 


160 


13 


105 


10 


85 


3 


175 


41 


80 


19 


64 


37 


88 


32 


76 


2 


160 


3 


160 



120 



80 



728.00 


242.66 


1,431.04 


110.08 


951.04 


95.10 


480.00 


160.00 


3.076.70 


75.04 


1,565.09 


82.37 


4,348.84 


117.53 


2,988.84 


93.40 


480.00 


240.00 


880.00 


293.33 



$ 81.84 

60.82 

250.00 



195.51 



107.92 
96.40 
207.00 
77.60 
190.60 
125.70 
323.31 
285.00 



134.17 
124.54 
225.00 
207.66 
178.33 
240.00 
57.63 
57.63 



242.66 



Salakies and Ti:K:\f^ 1909-'10. 



189 



Table IX. Salaries and Term — Continued. 





White. 






Colored. 






Number 
Teachers. 


Average Term 
in Days. 


Average Term 
in Days, Local- 
tax Districts. 


Total Amount 
Paid Teachers 
for Year. 

Average 
Amount Paid 
Each Teacher 
for Year. 


Number 
Teachers. 


a 

0) 

H 


Average Term 
in Days, Local- 
tax Districts. 


Total Amount 
Paid Teachers 
for Year. 


Average 
Amount Paid 
Each Teacher 
for Year. 


Jackson . _ 


69 


100 


160 


$ 11,693 61 


1169 47 


4 


120 


120 


$ 665 00 


$166 25 


Johnston. . 


132 


95 




27,355.08 


207.24 


42 


86 




4,730.53 


112 63 


Rural 


120 


87 


124 


23,735.08 


197.76 


37 


79 


120 


3,815.53 


103.12 


Selma 


6 


180 





1,890.00 


315.00 


2 


180 




450.00 


225.00 


Smithfield 


6 


173 




1,730.00 


288.33 


3 


120 




465.00 


155.00 


Jones 


26 


80 


160 


6,515.25 


262.12 


23 


80 


120 


2,377.59 


103.37 


Lee 


49 


97 




8,289.70 


169.17 


21 


80 




1,877.55 


89.41 


Rural 


39 


80 


143 


5,609.70 


143.83 


21 


80 


120 


1,877.55 


89.41 


Sanford 


10 
79 


160 
102 




2,680.00 
16 534 41 


268.00 
209 29 












Lenoir. 


31 


88 




3 296 25 


106 33 


Rural ... 


49 
23 


70 
160 




6,309.41 
8,665.00 


128.76 
376.73 


24 
5 


70 
160 




2,036.25 
1,020.00 


84.84 


Kinston 


204.00 


LaGrange 


7 


140 




1,560.00 


222.85 


2 


120 




240.00 


•120.00 


Lincoln 


90 


105 




13,507.75 


150.08 


14 


89 




1,406.27 


100.45 


Rural . 


78 


97 


107 


9,974 65 


127 88 


12 


77 




1,021 27 


85 10 


Lincolnton 


12 


160 




3,533.10 


294.42 


2 


160 


..... 


385.00 


192.50 


Macon. . 


67 


80 


126 


9,825 09 


146 64 


4 


80 




310 00 


77 50 


Madison .. 


88 


84 


120 


11,111.91 


126.27 


4 


80 




383.25 


95.81 


Martin 


57 


102 




9,403 92 


164 98 


34 


93 




4 219 67 


124 11 


Rural . 


47 


90 


160 


6,898.96 


146 78 


30 


85 




3,339.67 
640.00 


111 32 


Williamston 


' 


160 




1,344.96 


268.99 


3 


160 




213.33 


Robersonville 


5 


160 





1,160.00 


232.00 


1 


160 




240.00 


240.00 


McDowell 


79 


103 




14,087.44 


178.32 


10 


80 




1,078,50 


107.85 


Rural.. 


69 


95 


125 


11,167 44 Ifil S4 


10 


80 




1,078.50 


107 85 


Marion. 


10 
193 


160 
147 




2,920.00 
64,784.37 


292.00 
335.67 










Mecklenburg 


78 


114 




11,966.66 


153.42 


Rural 


111 


123 


148 


24,782.32 


22.? 2fi 


53 


84 




3,980 66 


75.11 


Charlotte 


82 


180 




40,002.05 ' 487.83 


25 


180 




7,980.00 


319.44 


Mitchell 


90 


80 


120 


10,014 79 • 111 57 


4 


80 




373 00 


93 25 


Mont gomery 


66 


90 




7,743.48 


117.32 


22 


90 




2,054.30 


93.38 


Rural 


62 


75 




6,903 48 


111 35 


18 


74 




1,554.30 
500 00 


86 35 


Troy._ 


4 


160 




840.00 


210.00 


4 


160 




125 00 


Moore 


95 


. 89 




14,373.52 


151.30 


31 


80 




2,588.68 


83.50 


Rural 


85 


80 


139 


11,258.52 


132.45 


31 


80 




2,588.68 


83 50 


Carthage. 


6 
4 


180 
153 




1,935.00 


.S22 ."iO 










Southern Pines. . 


1.180.00 ' 295.00 













1 m 



Salaries and Term^ 1909-'10. 



Table IX. Salaries and Term — Continued. 



Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount - 

New Hanover 

Rural 

Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Rural 

Elizaibeth City 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 

Person 

Rural 

Roxboro 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville 

Polk 

Randolph 

Rural 

Asliboro 

Randleman 

Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham . . 
Hamlet 







(H 


£ 


OJ 


ni 


.iJ 


r^ 



White. 



1^ 



110 

84 

26 

70 

19 

51 

69 

70 

59 

44 

48 

24 

24 

53 

36 

29 

7 

60 

50 

10 

147 

133 

14 

32 

148 

130 

10 

8 

60 

46 



Robeson I 130 



Rural 

Maxton 

Lumberton. 



116 
6 

8 



So 



5 U M 



c cs t: 
HPh£ 



» c o 
> C cj >- 



105 I 

82 j 
180 
164 
149 
170 

94 

96 

88 

84 
136 

92 
180 

99 

97 

82 
160 

93 

80 
160 
110 
105 
160 
'78 

95 

86 
160 
160 
137 
124 
180 
180 
112 
106 
177 
160 



139 



157 
143 
133 
101 



134 



140 



160 



119 



140 



142 



27,264.71 

16,654.10 

10,610.61 

29,949.70 

10,060.00 

19,889.70 

10,111.65 

10,908.88 

8,998.20 

6,384.09 

14,140.67 

3,647.10 

10,493.57 

8,489.50 

5,209.46 

3,458.96 

1,750.50 

9,395.75 

6,272.00 

3,123.75 

29,415.83 

24,214.63 

5,201.20 

3,845.90 

19,215.70 

14,975.70 

2,360.00 

1,880.00 

13,470.78 

7,215.78 

4,185.00 

2,070.00 

29,984.11 

25,934.11 

1,530.00 

2,520.00 



Colored. 



$247.86 
198.26 
408.10 
427.85 
529.47 
389.99 
146.54 
155.84 
152.51 
145.09 
294.59 
151.96 
437.23 
160.18 
144.71 
119.27 
250.07 
156.59 
125.44 
312.37 
200.11 
182.06 
371.51 
120.18 
129.83 
115.19 
236.00 
235.00 
224.51 
156.86 
523.12 
345.00 
230.64 
223.57 
255.00 
315.00 



Si "-I 

^ CD 
I" 



Bf 



48 
41 

7 

35 
13 
22 
51 
19 
23 
19 
22 
15 

7 
39 
25 
22 

3 

35 
32 

3 

56 
51 

5 

9 
20 
18 

2 



28 

24 

2 

2 

68 

63 

2 

3 






VJ O oi 



<.'■ 



90 
75 

180 

165 

157 

170 
82 
73 
81 
90 

115 
85 

180 
89 
86 
76 

160 
87 
80 

160 
87 
80 

160 
75 
85 
78 

160 



S o3 u; 
-^^^ 



2S3 

^% . 

. CD C o'^ 

i> c ca i- 



108 



100 
80 



77 



107 



112 
101 
180 
180 

82. 

79 
120 
120 



100 



J 5,846.66 
3,957.19 
1,889.47 
10,447.85 
3,788.35 
6,659.50 
4,554.24 
1,796.75 
1,961.63 
2,159.71 
3,679.50 
1,564.50 
2,115.00 
3,522.50 
2,843.49 
2,137.49 

700.00 
2,641.80 
2,078.80 

563.00 
5,141.80 
4,139.80 
1,002.00 

646.00 
2,138.00 
1,538.00 

600.00 



110 



3,369.12 

2,379.12 

495.00 

495.00 

13,550.80 

11,945.20 

345.60 

1 260.00 



$121.82 

96.52 

269.92 

488.78 

291.41 

302.70 

89.29 

94.56 

85.28 

113.61 

170.43 

104.30 

302.14 

90.32 

113.73 

97.15 

235.33 

75.48 

64.96 

187.66 

91.82 

81.17 

200.40 

71.77 

106.90 

85.44 

300.00 



120.32 
99.13 
247.50 
247.50 
199.28 
189.61 
172.80 
420.00 



Salakies and Term, 1909-'10. 



Table IX. Salaries and Term — Continued. 



While. 



Colored. 



I 



Uockingham. 

Rural 

Reidsville, 






98 
83 
15 



So 



S=3 ■ 

(2 " tfi 



Rowan I 154 

Rural i 130 

Salisbury 1 24 

Rutherford i 105 

I 

Sampson | 125 

Rural I 118 

I 

Clinton ; 7 

Scotland 34 

Rural I 25 

Laurinburg 9 

Stanly 64 

Rural 54 

Albemarle : 10 

Stokes 1 90 

Surry ' 124 

Rural 111 

Mount Airy 13 

Swain 55 

I 

42 



Transylvania 

Tyrrell i 25 

Union 133 



Rural 

Monroe 

Vance 

Rural 

Henderson. 

Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 



118 
15 
60 
41 
19 
197 
139 
58 
52 



104 

94 

160 

100 

90 

160 

86 

90 

86 

160 

111 

94 

160 

90 

79 

150 

85 

87 

79 

160 

97 

104 

78 

97 

87 

180 

123 

106 

160 

127 

111 

166 

95 



140 



142 



120 



155 



121 



118 



158 

136 

98 



108 



133 



134 



§■§ 

B ca ^: 



<tj<UH£ ?;h 



143 



23,540.07 

18,003.22 

5,536.85 

34,528.75 

24,000.00 

10,528.75 

14,352.18 

21,405.78 

19,445.78 

1,960.00 

7,135.00 

4,686.25 

2,448.75 

10,931.98 

8,797.35 

2,134.63 

10,715.82 

18,611.39 

14,446.89 

4,167.-50 

7,382.82 

6,900.23 

3,614.62 

26,796.80 

20,981.80 

5,815.00 

13,040.20 

6,763,45 

6,276.75 

51,840.47 

23,919.68 

27,920.79 

10,124.75 



^ cd . 

> E ri 



■ -v 



$240.20 
216.91 
369.12 
224.21 
184.61 
438.69 
136.68 
171.25 
164.79 
280.00 
209.85 
187.45 
272.08 
170.81 
162.91 
213.46 
119.06 
150.10 
130.15 
320.57 
134.23 
164.29 
144.58 
201.48 
177.81 
389.66 
217.33 
164.96 
333.51 
263.15 
172.09 
481.39 
194.71 



43 
35 

8 
47 
41 

6 
19 
52 
48 

4 
29 
23 

6 
11 
11 



10 
15 
13 
2 
4 
1 
9 

42 

39 

3 

33 
24 
9 
108 
80 
28 
46 



e 

0) 

> _ 



g|p 

i' _ 5 



95 
80 

160 
92 
82 

160 
76 
84 
82 

120 

100 
84 

160 
79 
79 



140 



-4-3 CC 

B c« t; 



99 



81 

84 

72 

160 

65 

80 

72 

85 

79 

180 

100 

78 

160 

110 

91 

166 

86 



105 



100 



$ 5,240.00 

3,480.00 

1,760.00 

5,970.00 

4,522.00 

1,448.00 

1,754.16 

3,843.04 

3,273.04 

570.00 

3,137.75 

2,437.75 

700.00 

671.17 

671.17 



2« 

(D +ji OJ t-* 
03 -- _ k 

i > R cS !- 



$121.86 

99 42 

220.00 

127.02 

110.29 

241.33 

92.32 

73.90 

68.19 

142.50 

108.19 

105.98 

116.66 

61.01 

61.01 



90 



101 



89 



101 



111 



784.96 

1,684.00 

1,244.00 

440.00 

334.95 

100.00 

851.39 

4,998.75 

4,233.75 

765.00 

3,835.57 

1,785.02 

2,050.55 

14^9.67 

7,238.45 

7,401.22 

4,470.60 



78.49 
112.26 

95.69 
220.00 

83.73 
100.00 

94.59 
119.01 
108.55 
255.00 
116.23 

74.38 
227.84 
135.55 

90.48 
264.. 33 

97.18 



192 



Salaeies and Term^ 1909-'10. 



Table IX. Salaries and Term — Continued. 



White. 






<.5 



g O tn 



Washington 37 

Rural I 27 

Roper 4 

Plymouth 6 

Watauga 81 

Wayne 121 

Rural 83 

Goldsboro i 25 

Mount Olive 6 

Fremont 7 

Wilkes 168 

Rural 160 

No. Wilkesboro -j 8 

Wilson j 100 

Rural j 74 

Wilson City ! 22 

1 

Lucama 4 

Yadkin 74 

Yancey 59 

North Carolina 8,369 

Rural 7,047 

City 1,322 



101 

80 

160 

160 

80 

119 

91 

180 

177 

180 

95 

92 

160 

113 

91 

180 

160 

83 

80 



129 



106 



146 



110 



B C8 j^ 

<^^ 

® ^ o 



2S 

> C rf t; 



Colored. 



$ 5,512.00 

3;315.00 

760.00 

1,437.00 

8,356.43 

27,229.62 

12,635.00 

11,464.62 

1,600.00 

1,530.00 

22,466.07 

20,066.07 

2,400.00 

30,714.50 

19,880.24 

9,934.26 

900.00 

8,471.49 

6,300.00 



i$148. 
122, 
I 190, 
j 239, 
I 103, 
225 
152 
454 
266 
218 
133 
125 
300 
307 
268 
451 
225 
114 
106 



104.6 

92.7 

175.2 



1,620,652.96 

1,126,059.83 

494,593.13 



193 
159 
374 



97 
,78 
00 
.50 
.16 
,03 
.23 
.58 
.66 
.57 
.72 
.41 
.00 
.14 
.65 
.55 
.00 
.48 
.77 
.40 
.49 
.12 



■2'S 



26 

20 

2 

4 

3 

58 

40 

12 

4 

2 

23 

21 

2 

39 

27 

10 

2 



s 

E-t 



S O 05 



gcSQ 



2,793 

2,393 

400 



98 

80 

160 

160 

80 

113 

83 

1?0 

177 

180 

88 

82 

160 

111 

85 

180 

120 

72 

80 



116 



86 



*a CO 



t«, 



C C3 (J 
° =* o 



93.7 

81.7 

164.8 



$ 2,533.50 

1,603.00 

365.00 

565.50 

240.00 

8,397.88 

3.845.13 

3,284.00 

878.75 

390.00 

1,836.13 

1,556.13 

280.00 

6,973.87 

3,703.87 

3,065.00 

205.00 

743.90 

200.00 



C CS !- 



O) 



330,500.31 
229,519.20 
100,981.11 



I 97.44 

80.15 

182.50 

141.37 

80.00 

144,79 

96.12 

273.66 

219.68 

195.00 

79.83 

74.10 

140.00 

178.82 

137.18 

306.50 

102.50 

82.65 

66.66 



118.33 

95.91 

252.45 



E. SHOOLHOUSES, DISTRICTS, AND SCHOOLS. 



TABLE X. SCHOOL PROPERTY, 1909-'10. 

This table shows by races the number and value of public schoolhouses and 
grounds, rural and city. 

Summary of Table X and Comparison with 1908-'09. 



Total value all school property, 1909-10 

Total value all school property, 1908-09 

Increase 

Value white school property, 1909-10 

Value white school property, 1908-'09 

Increase -. 

Value colored school property, 1909-' 10 

Value colored school property, 1908-'09- 

Increase 

Total number schoolhouses, 1909-10 

Total number schoolhouses, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Number white schoolhouses, 1909-' 10 

Number white schoolhouses, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Number colored schoolhouses, 1909-10 

Number colored schoolhouses, 1908-09 

Increase 

Average value each schoolhouse, 1909-10 

Average value each schoolhouse, 1908-09 

Increase 

Average value each schoolhouse (white), 1909-10.- 
Average value each schoolhouse (white\ 1908-'09. . 

Increase 

Average value each schoolhouse (colored), 1909-10 
Average value each schoolhouse (colored), 1908-09 

Increase 

♦Decrease. 



Rural. 



$3,094,416.00 

2,846,998.00 

247,418.00 

2,706,911.00 

2,487,614.00 

219,297.00 

387,505.00 

359,384.00 

28,121.00 

7,350 

7,401 

*51 

5,156 

5,189 

*33 

2,194 

2,212 

*18 

$ 421.00 

384.00 

37.00 

525.00 

479.00 

154.00 

176.00 

162.00 

14.00 



City. 


$2,768,553.00 


2,588,791.00 


179,762.00 


2,478,610.00 


2,303,926.00 


174,684.00 


289,943.00 


284,865.00 


5,078.00 


259 


269 


*10 


169 


173 


*4 


90 


96 


*6 


$ 10,689.33 


9,623.00 


1,066.33 


14,666.00 


13,317,00 


1.349.00 


3,221.00 


2,965.00 


256.00 



North 
Carolina. 



$5,862,969.00 

5,435,789.00 

427,180.00 

5,185,521.00 

4,791,540.00 

493,981.00 

677,448.00 

644,249.00 

33,199.00 

7,609 

7,670 

*61 

5,325 

5,362 

*37 

2,284 

2,308 

*24 

$ 770.53 

708.00 

62.53 

973.00 

893.00 

80.00 

296.00 

279.00 

17.00 



Part 11—13 



194 



School Property, 1909-'10. 



Table X. School Pbopkrtt — Continued. 



White. 



Colored. 



Number ; Total 

of Value of 

School- School 

houses. Property. 



Alamance 

Rural 

Burlington.. 

Graham 

Haw River.. 

Mebane 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Rural 

Wadesboro . , 

Ashe 

Beaufort 

Rural 

Washington. 

Belhaven 

Bertie 

Rural 

Windsor 

Aulander 

Bladen 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Rural 

Asheville 

Burke 

Rural-.- 

Morganton.. 

Cabarrus 

Rural 

Concord 

Caldwell 

Rural 

Lenoir 

Granite 

Rhodhiss 



57 


$ 78,415 


51 


33,640 


3 


16,500 


1 


16,775 


1 


6,000 


1 


5,500 


50 


5,000 


41 


7,960 


45 


59,500 


43 


43,500 


2 


16,000 


98 


30,060 


77 


85,102 


75 


17,665 


1 


47,537 


1 


19,900 


65 


50,150 


63 


26,650 


1 


20,000 


1 


3.500 


66 


30,500 


48 


12,175 


101 


176,800 


90 


71,600 


11 


105,200 


53 


38,000 


52 


13,000 


1 


' 25,000 


46 


93,030 


44 


30,030 


2 


63,000 


73 


46,240 


70 


19,540 


1 


22,500 


1 


3,000 


1 


1,200 



Number I Total 

of Value of 

School- School 

houses. I Property. 



28 

26 

1 

1 



5 

3 

41 

40 I 
1 I 

10 I 

36 j 

34 
1 
1 

54 

I 

53 
1 



47 



5,892 

3,832 

1,500 

560 



500 

240 

12,000 

10,000 

2,000 

320 

9.122 

3.722 

2 900 

2,500 

12,920 

12,520 

400 



Total 
Houses. 



4,100 



25 


4,1.50 1 


17 


16,790 


13 


1,545 


4 


15,245 


9 


2,500 


8 


2,000 


1 


500 


20 


8,835 


19 


3,835 


1 


5,000 


14 


1,500 


12 


850 


2 


650 







Total 
Value. 



85 


$ 84,307 


77 


37,472 


4 


18,000 


2 


17.335 


1 


6,000 


1 


5,500 


55 


5,500 


44 


8,200 


86 


71,500 


83 


53,500 


3 


18,000 


108 


30.380 


213 


94,224 


109 


21,387 


2 


50,437 


2 


22,400 


119 


63,070 


116 


39,170 


2 


20,400 


1 


3,500 


113 


34,600 


73 


16,325 


118 


193,590 


103 


73,145 


15 


120,445 


62 


40,500 


60 


15,000 


2 


25,500 


66 


101,865 


63 


33,865 


3 


68,000 


87 


47,740 


82 


20,390 


3 


23,150 


1 


3.000 


1 


1.200 



School Peopkuty^ 1909-'10. 



11)5 



Table X. .Srnooi. I'kopeuty — Conlimied. 



Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Rural 

Hickory 

Newton 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Rural 

Murphy 

Andrews 

Chowan 

Rural - 

Edenton 

Clay... 

Cleveland 

Rural 

Shelby 

Kings Mountain 

Columbus 

Craven 

Rural 

New Bern 

Cumberland 

Rural 

Fayetteville 

Hope Mills 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Rural 

Lexington 

Thomasville 

Davie 

Duplin 



White. 


Colored. 


Total 
Houses. 




Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 


Tot al 

Value of 

School 

Property. 


Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 


Total 

Value of 

School 

Property. 


Total 
Value. 


18 


$ 6,755 


12 


S 1,390 


30 


$ 8,145 


39 


18,980 


6 


800 


45 


19,780 


40 


11,400 


38 


4,000 


78 


15,400 


78 


61,500 


18 


4,650 


96 


66,150 


76 


32,000 


16 


3,150 


92 


35,150 


1 


15,000 


1 


1,000 


2 


16,000 


1 


14,500 


1 


500 


2 


15,000 


75 


26,750 


38 


3,000 


113 


29,750 


58 


40,450 


3 


800 


61 


41,250 


53 


17,450 


2 


500 


55 


17,950 


1 


10,000 






1 


10,000 


4 


13,000 




1 


300 


5 


13,300 


20 


21,000 


15 


4,750 


35 


25,750 


19 


9,000 


15 


4,750 


34 


13,750 


1 


12,000 






1 


12,000 


17 


7,000 






17 


7,000 


75 


87,750 


21 


3,500 


96 


89,250 


73 


30,750 


19 


2,100 


92 


32,850 


1 


35,000 


1 


1,000 


2 


36,000 


1 


20,000 


1 


400 


2 


20,400 


87 


52,175 


38 


5,335 


125 


57,510 


48 


127,225 


33 


14,510 


81 


141.735 


45 


27,225 


32 


4,510 


77 


31,735 


3 


100,000 


1 


10,000 


i 


110,000 


76 


87,500 


55 


13,850 


131 


101,350 


73 


50,000 


54 


8,850 


127 


58,850 


2 


30,000 


1 


5,000 


3 


35,000 


1 


7,500 






1 


7,500 


34 


19,000 


14 


2,020 


48 


21,020 


18 


6,000 


1 


75 


19 


6,075 


88 


83,935 


17 


7,908 


105 


91.843 


86 


18,935 


15 


1,708 


101 


20,643 


1 


55,000 


1 


5,000 


2 


60,000 


1 


10,000 


1 


1,200 


2 


11,200 


36 


9,890 


9 


2,395 


45 


12,285 


74 


23,130 


40 


4,500 


114 


27,630 



19(') 



School Pkoperty^ 1909-'10. 



Table X. School Property — Continued. 



Durham 

Rural 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Rural 

Tarboro 

Forsyth 

Rural- 

Winston 

Franklin 

Rural 

Franklinton 

Louisburg 

Youngsville 

Gaston 

Rural 

Gastonia 

Cherry ville 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford . 

Rural 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Guilford College. 

Halifax 

Rural 

Scotland Neck.. 

Weldon 

Enfield 

Roanoke Rapids 



White. 


Colored. 


Total 
Houses. 




Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 


Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 


Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 


Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 


Total 
Value. 


33 


$ 235,000 


18 


$ 31,500 


51 


$ 266,500 


28 


60,000 


16 


6,500 


44 


66,500 


5 


175,000 


2 


25,000 


7 


200,000 


42 


60,600 


38 


14,200 


80 


74,800 


39 


19,600 


35 


8,200 


74 


27,800 


3 


41,000 


3 


6,000 


6 


47,000 


84 


177,000 


22 


23,500 


106 


200,500 


80 


47,000 


21 


8,500 


101 


55,500 


4 


130,000 


1 


15,000 


5 


145,000 


44 


71,650 


38 


8,650 


82 


80,300 


41 


24,650 


36 


4,150 


77 


28,800 


1 


17,000 






1 


17,000 


1 


25,000 


1 


4,000 


2 


29,000 


1 


5,000 


1 


500 


2 


5,500 


62 


84,192 


29 


8,895 


91 


93,087 


60 


50,192 


28 


4,895 


88 


55,087 


1 


30,000 


1 


4,000 


2 


34,000 


1 


4,000 






1 


4,000 


31 


18,775 


23 


2,350 


54 


21,125 


24 


5,150 


1 


25 


25 


5,175 


54 


41,900 


44 


6,680 


98 


48,580 


52 


35,650 


42 


4,280 


94 


39,930 


2 


6,250 


2 


2,400 


4 


8,650 


30 


15,475 


21 


3,250 


51 


18.725 


93 


241,825 


31 


23,580 


124 


265,405 


1 

; 84 


92,825 


29 


8,580 


113 


101,405 


6 


85,000 


2 


15,000 


8 


100,000 


2 


60,000 






2 


60,000 


1 


4,000 




1 


4,000 


49 


64,693 


50 


14,350 


99 


79,043 


44 


14,660 


46 


8,990 


90 


23,650 


1 


19,000 


1 


1,000 


2 


20,000 


1 


15,033 


1 


2,360 


2 


17,393 


2 


V 6,000 


1 


1,000 


3 


7,000 


1 


10,000 


1 


1,000 


2 


11.000 



School Peopeety^ 1909-'10. 



197 



Table X. Schooi„ Property— Continued. 



Harnett _. 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville . . 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville 

Hertford 

Hyde... 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville 

Statesville 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

Sraithfield 

Jones 

Lee 

Rural 

Sanford 

Lenoir 

Rural 

Kinston 

LaGrange . . : . 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincolnton 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Rural 

Williamston . . 
Robersonville . 





White. 


Colored. 


Total 
Houses. 






Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 


Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 


Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 


Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 


Total 
Value. 




60 
59 

1 
53 
51 

2 
49 
47 

2 
32 
24 
91 
89 
.1 

1 

45 

108 

106 

1 

1 

26 
34 
33 

1 

41 
58 

2 


$ 58,030 

43,030 

15,000 

45,500 

25,500 

20,000 

50,320 

32,820 

17,500 

8,370 

14,705 

97,315 

36,315 

25,000 

36,000 

40,149 

52,705 

45,205 

2,500 

5,000 

9,925 

23,585 

7,585 

16,000 

62,100 

23,100 

28,000 

11,000 

45,846 

20,846 

25.000 

22,870 

2,700 

32.500 

24,000 

5,000 

3,500 


26 
26 


$ 4,375 
4,375 


86 
85 
1 
55 
52 
3 

58 

55 

3 

65 

43 

124 

120 

2 

2 

48 

146 

142 

2 

2 

47 

46 

45 

66 

61 

3 

2 

71 

69 

2 

60 

73 

69 

2 

2 


$ 62,405 




47,405 




15 000 




2 

1 

1 

9 

8 

1 

33 

19 

33 

31 

1 

1 

3 

38 

36 

1 

1 

21 

' 12 

12 


1,600 
600 
1,000 
2,390 
1,390 
1,000 
5,218 
2,110 
10,200 
6,200 
200 
3,800 
2,000 
8,628 
7,328 
300 
1,000 
2,250 
1,488 
1,488 


47,100 




26,100 




21,000 




52,710 




34,210 


- 


18,500 
13,588 




16,815 




107,515 




42,515 




25,200 




39,800 




42,149 




61,333 




52,533 




2,800 




6,000 




12,175 




25,073 




9,073 




16,000 




25 

23 

1 

1 

13 

12 

1 

4 


8,290 
4,790 
2,500 
1,000 
3,654 
2,654 
1,000 
425 


70,390 




27,890 




30,500 




1 


12,000 




58 

57 

1 






23,500 




26,000 




56 


23,295 




5 

45 
43 

1 
1 


2.700 




28 
26 

1 
1 


10,150 

8,000 

1,500 

650 


42.650 




32,000 




6,500 




4.150 



198 



School Propekty, 1909-'10. 



Table X. School Property- — Continued. 



McDowell 

Rural 

Marion 

Mecklenburg 

Rural 

Charlotte 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 1, 

Rural 

Troy 

Moore 

Rural 

Carthage 

Southern Pines 

Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount - 

New Hanover 

Rural 

Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Rural 

Elizabeth City. 

Pender. 

Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 

Person 

Rural 

Roxboro 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville 



White. 


Colored. 


Total 
Houses. 




Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 


Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 


Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 


Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 


Total 
Value. 


56 


$ 56,500 


9 


$ 1,200 


65 


$ 57,700 


55 


41,500 


9 


1,200 


64 


42,700 


1 


15,000 






1 


15,000 


78 


209.153 


58 


16,785 


136 


225,938 


68 


74,153 


55 


9,285 


123 


83,438 


10 


135,000 


3 


7,500 


13 


142,500 


70 


21,500 


2 


500 


72 


22,000 


59 


12.961 


19 


2,820 


78 


15,781 


58 


11,461 


17 


i,820 


75 


13,281 


1 


1,500 


2 


1,000 


3 


2,500 


63 


61,920 


23 


4,565 


86 


66,485 


61 


47,420 


23 


4,565 


84 


51,985 


1 


2,500 






1 


2.500 


1 


12,000 






1 


1.200 


54 


83,200 


38 


11,470 


92 


94,670 


51 


38,200 


37 


6,470 


88 


44,670 


3 


45,000 


1 


5,000 


4 


50,000 


17 


108,875 


13 


16,275 


30 


125,150 


14 


9,875 


11 


5,275 


25 


15,150 


3 


99,000 


2 


11,000 


5 


110,000 


41 


23,700 


44 


6,000 


85 


29,700 


53 


17,880 


20 


2,520 


73 


20,400 


39 


17,570 


25 


3,595 


64 


21.165 


22 


24,000 


13 


3,000 


35 


27,000 


23 


70,300 


18 


8,000 


41 


78,300 


21 


12,300 


16 


5,000 


37 


17,300 


2 


58,000 


2 


3,000 


4 


61,000 


43 


25,000 


35 


5,000 


78 


30,000 


28 


25,800 


19 


8.865 


47 


34,665 


27 


10,800 


18 


3,865 


45 


14,665 


1 


15,000 


1 


5,000 


2 


20,000 


48 


36,760 


31 


4,700 


79 


41,460 


46 


14,260 


30 


, 2,200 


76 


16,460 


2 


22,500 


1 


2,500 


3 


25,000 


81 


105,000 


52 


20,000 


133 


125.000 


80 


80,000 


51 


15,000 


131 


95,000 


1 


25,000 


1 


5,000 


2 


.30.000 



School Pkoperty, 1909-'10. 



199 



Table X. School Property — Continued. 





White. 


Colored. 


Total 

Houses. 






Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 


Total 
Value of ' 

School 1 
Property, j 

• 1 


Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 


Total 

Value of 

School 

Property. 


Total 
Value. 


Polk --- - 


29 

100 

97 

2 

1 
31 
29 

1 i 

1 
83 
80 

2 

1 
72 
70 

2 
86 
88 

3 

78 

■ 90 

89 

1 
26 
23 

3 
61 
60 

1 
07 
88 
86 

2 
46 
28 
24 


S 5,792 
98,435 1 
59,935 
25,000 
13,500 
40,450 

1 

11,000 
18,000 
11,450 
100,455 
55,455 
10,000 
35,000 
71,000 
41,000 
30,000 
85,305 
55,305 
30,000 
37,900 
43,350 
39,850 

3,500 
14,717 

6,620 
28,097 
27,115 
17,615 

9,500 
28,150 
56,000 
36,000 
20,000 
20,950 
23,860 

3,320 


8 
19 
IS 

1 


$ 1,050 
3,415 ' 
2,915 
500 


37 

119 

115 

3 

1 

56 

52 

2 

2 

165 

160 

3 

2 

103 

100 

3 

120 

116 

4 

101 

139 

138 

1 

51 

45 

6 

68 

67 

1 

77 

102 

99 

3 

47 

1 30 

! 33 


$ 6,842 


Randolph 


101,850 


Rural - 


62,850 


Ashboro . 


25,500 




13,500 


Richmond 


25 

23 

1 

1 

82 

80 

1 

1 

31 

30 

1 

34 

33 

1 

23 

49 

49 


6,750 

4,500 

1,500 

750 

22,318 

16,318 

1,000 

5,000 

6,500 

4,000 

2,500 

10,155 

5,155 

5,000 

4,590 

3,675 

3,675 


47,200 


Rural - -- - 


15,500 


Rockingham 


19,500 


Hamlet .. .- 


12,200 


Robeson _ '_ _ 


122,773 


Rural 


71,773 


Maxton 


11,000 


I.umberton . - 


40,000 


Rockingham 


77,500 


Rural 

Reidsville 


45,000 
32,500 


Rowan 


95,460 


Rural 


60,460 


Salisbury. . 


35,000 


Rutherford 


42,490 


Sampson __- 


47,025 


Rural 


43,525 


Clinton 


3,500 


Scotland _ 


25 

22 

3 

7 
7 


8,875 

3,375 

5,500 

235 

j 235 


42,592 


Rural - _- 


9,995 


Laurinburg 


33,597 


Stanlj' . . 


27,350 


Rural 


17,850 


Albemarle 


9.500 


Stokes 


10 
14 
13 

1 
1 
2 
9 


2,000 

1,900 

■ 1,300 

600 

1 150 

• 250 

810 


30,150 


Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy 


57,900 
37,300 
20,600 


Swain 


21,100 


Transylvania 

Tyrrell . 


24,110 
4,130 



?00 



School Pkopekty, 1909-'10. 



Table X. School Property — CotUimted. 



Union 

Rural 

Monroe 

Vance— 

Rural 

Henderson.. 

Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington- 

Rural... - 

Roper - 

Plymouth 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount OUve 

Fremont . 

Wilkes 

Rural 

North Wilkesboro- 

Wilson 

Rural 

Wilson City 

Lucama 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

North Carolina 

Rural 

City 



Wliite. 


Colored. 


Total 
Houses. 




Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 


Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 


Number 

of 
School- 
houses. 


Total 
Value of 

School 
Property. 


Total 
Value. 


"5 


$ 42.500 


38 


S 8,165 


113 


$ 50.665 


74 


17,500 


37 


5,665 


111 


23,165 


1 


25,000 


1 


2,500 


2 


27,500 


27 


44,000 


25 


17,500 


52 


61,500 


23 


17,000 


22 


2,500 


45 


19,500 


4 


27.000 


3 


15,000 


7 


42,000 


95 


232,304 


66 


60,254 


161 


298,558 


S7 


118,136 


62 


20,126 


149 


138,262 


S 


114,168 


4 


40,128 


12 


154,296 


33, 


20,490 


39 


5,380 


72 


25,870 


27 


15.854 


IS 


2.178 


45 


18,032 


25 , 


3,354 


17 


1.878 


42 


5,232 


1 


5,000 


1 


300 


2 


5,300 


1 


7.500 






1 


7,500 


. 68 


20,130 






68 


20,130 


72 


94,245 


41 


18,815 


113 


103,060 


65 


41.745 


38 


8,815 


103 


50,560 


3 


32.000 


1 


5,000 


4 


37,000 


1 


12,500 


1 


3,000 


2 


15,500 


3 


8,000 


1 


2.000 


4 


10.000 


126 


51.786 


17 


2,478 


143 


54.264 


125 


48,286. 


16 


2,178 


141 


50,464 


1 


3,500 


1 


300 


2 


3,800 


55 


74,850 


26 


21,800 


81 


96,650 


51 


30.850 


24 


9,300 


75 


40.150 


2 


32.000 


1 


12.000 


3 


44.000 


2 


12.000 


1 


500 


3 


12,500 


.53 


16,722 j 


6 


500 


59 


17,222 


36 


11.470 ' 


2 


300 


38 


11,770 


5.325 


5,185,521 


2.284 


677,448 


7,609 


5,862,969 


5,156 


2,706.911 


2.194 


387,505 


7,350 


3,094,416 


169 


2.478,610 


90 


289.943 


259 


2,768,553 



Log Houses a.m> Districts, 1901J-'10. 



201 



TABLE XI. LOG SCHOOLHOUSES, DISTRICTS, AND DISTRICTS 
WITHOUT HOUSES, 1909-'10. 

This table shows the number of districts, the number of log schoolhouses, 
;iik1 the number of districts without schoolhouses, by counties and by race?. 

Summary of Table XI and Compabisox with 1908-'00. 



Number of school districts 

White 

Colored 

Number of log schoolhouses 

White .-- 

Colored 

Number of districts having no house 

White 

Col ored 



1908-'09. 


1909-' 10. 


Decrease. 


7,670 


7,679 


*9 


5,356 


5,373 


*17 


2.314 


2,306 


8 


283 


263 


20 


102 


94 


8 


181 


169 


12 


345 


325 


20 


207 


204 


3 


138 


121 


17 



White. 



Colored. 



Decrease in 
School Districts. 



Districts Districts Districts Districts 

School Having Having School 
Districts. Log No Districts 

Houses House. 



Alamance..-.. 

Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Bninswick 

Buncombe 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

♦Increase. 



55 


1 


3 


26 


52 




1 


6 


41 


1 




3 


47 




2 


40 


99 


5 


1 


10 


75 




1 


29 


63 




1 


55 


68 


1 


3 


47 


42 




1 


27 


98 




6 


17 


50 


6 


1 


10 


52 




3 


22 


75 


1 


2 


13 


18 






12 


.39 




3 


6 


42 


5 


3 


38 


76 






16 


79 


1 


8 


39 



24 
2 
3 



Having 

Log 
Houses. 


Having 

No 
House. 


White. : Colored. 


3 


1 

1 


1 ' 


2 




1 






5 










4 4 









2 1 
5 2 
1 




2 








3 









202 



Log Houses and Disteicts^ 1909-'10. 



Table XI. Log Schoolhouses, Districts, etc. — -Continued. 



White. 



Colored. 



Decrease in 
School Districts. 



Districts 
School Having 
Districts. Log 
Houses. 



Districts Districts 



Districts 

Having i School \ Having Having -nrviit^ 

No Districts.! Log No wniie. 

House. 1 Houses. House. 



Cherokee 54 

Chowan 19 

Clay 17 

Cleveland 76 

Columbus 89 

Craven 47 

Cumberland | 72 

Currituck 34 

Dare 19 

Davidson.- - 90 

Davie 42 

Duplin 74 

Durham 28 

Edgecombe 39 

Forsyth 80 

Franklin 45 

Gaston 67 

Gates 31 

Graham 25 

Granville 53 

Greene 32 

Guilford 85 

Halifax . 50 

Harnett 61 

Haywood 54 

Henderson 49 

Hertford 31 

Hyde 28 

Iredell 92 

Jackson 43 

Johnston 109 

Jones 26 

Lee 36 

Lenoir 41 

Lincoln ; 59 



1 


2 ; 

1 


— 


1 


3 
6 

1 
i 
1 


6 
5 

1 











3 


2 
5 






5 
3j 


2 
2 
3 


1 
1 


2 

10 
2 

5 
3 


i 


2 



15 

1 
23 
38 
33 
56 
14 

1 

17 
11 
40 
16 
35 
21 
36 
24 
23 

1 
42 
21 
:« 

.")9 
32 

1 

10 
33 
19 
33 

3 
37 
21 
17 
24 
11 



12 



3 

13 
2 



Colored. 



Log Houses and Districts, 190r»-'10. 



•20:; 



Table Xi. Log Schoolhouses, Districts, etc. — Conlinued. 



White. 



Colored. 



Decrease in 
School Districts. 



Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg- . 

Mitchell 

Montgomery-- 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover- 
Northampton - 

On.slow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank- _- 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. - 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania-. 
Tyrrell 

♦Increase 




Districts! Districts ; Districtsj Districts 

School ! Having ! Having School i Having i Having -white, i Colored. 



69 
43 
.54 
70 
70 

eo 

64 
.54 
14 
41 
52 
42 
23 
21 



4? 




2 


■'7 






44 






SO 






33 

97 
35 


1 
4 


4 
2 
6 


SI 


_ 


5 


7? 


4 

] 




S"^ 




7S 


1 
1 


SS 




''S 




63 




3 


67 




S9 




3 


46 
30 
2.5 


3 
1 


1 
2 
1 



18 '■■ 

32 

51 

10 

20 

24 

88 

32 

.39 

23 

49 

20 

11 

10 

13 

4 

2 

9 



16 



10 
4 
3 
2 



•204: 



Log Houses and Districts^ 1909-'10. 



Table XI. Log Schoolhouses, Districts, etc. — Continued 





White. 


Colored. 


Decrease in 
School Districts. 




School 
Districts. 


Districts 
Having 

Log 
Houses. 


Districts 
Having 

No 
House. 


School 
Districts. 


Districts 
Having 

Log 
Houses. 


Districts 
Having 

No 
House. 


White. 


Colored. 


Union. . 


84 
23 
85 
34 
26 
71 
65 
124 
49 
54 
49 




1 

1 
9 
2 


38 

21 

61 

39 

18 

4 

38 

17 

25 

9 

2 




1 






Vance.- 








, 


Wake. . 







1 


5 


Warren - _ 




1 


2 


Washington . . 






Watauga 


^ 


3 




4 






Wayne. . 




— 


Wilkes... 


4 


4 


1 


1 - - -- 


Wilson . . 




2 1 


Yadkin.. - . .. 


1 
5 


3 
13 


2 

1 


3 






Yancey 














North Carolina — 


5.373 


94 


204 


2,306 


169 


121 


44 


15 



• Kinds of Rural Schools^ 1909-'10. 



205 



TABLE XII. NUMBER OF WHITE RURAL SCHOOLS, ETC., 1909-'10. 

This table shows the number of white rural schools, the school population 
and the land area of the counties, the number of white rural schools having 
only one teacher, the number of white rural schools having two or more teach- 
ers, and the number of white rural schools in which some high-school sul)jects 
are taught. 

Summary of Table XII and Compabison with 190S-'09. 



White. 


1908-09. 


1909-'10. 


Increase. 


Number of rural white schools . . . _ 


5,371 

410,659 

48,580 

9.0 

76 

4,120 

1,251 

1,013 


5,373 

416,251 

48,580 

9 

77 

4,018 

1,355 

1,041 


"> 


Rural white school population . 


5 592 


Land area of State 




Average area covered by each rural school 




School population to each rural school 


1 


Number of schools having only one teacher. 


*102 


Number of schools having two or more teachers.. ^ 

Number of schools in which some high-school subjects 
are taught. 


104 
28 



Number 

of 

Rural 

White 

Schools. 



Rural 
White 
School 
Popula- 
tion. 



Land 
Area of 

the 
County. 



Alamance. 
Alexander. 
Alleghany. 

Anson 

Ashe 

Beaufort . . 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick. 
Buncombe. 

Burke 

Cabarrus . . 
Caldwell... 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba . . 



55 


4,330 


494 


52 


3,897 


297 


41 


3,054 


223 


47 


3,187 


551 


99 


7,242 


399 


75 


4,068 


819 


63 


2,890 


712 


68 


3,177 


1,013 


42 


2,636 


812 


98 


9,846 


624 


50 


4,985 


534 


52 


4,515 


387 


75 


5,061 


507 


18 


1,141 


218 


39 


3,461 


538 


42 


2,617 


396 


76 


6,852 


408 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Only 

One 

Teacher. 



Number 
of Rural 
Schools 
Having 
Two or 
More 
Teachers. 



33 
34 
30 
40 
80 
65 
57 
62 
36 
74 
41 
31 
65 
13 
32 
36 
50 



22 

18 

11 

' 7 

19 

10 

6 

6 

6 

24 

9 

21 

10 

5 

7 

6 

26 



Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 

Some High 

School 

Subjects 

Are 
Taugiit. 



12 

5 

1 

8 
25 

6 

4 
23 

8 
25 
31 

4 

2 

5 

1 

7 . 
45 



♦Decrease. 



206 



Kinds of Eural Schools^ 1909-'10. 



Table XII. Number of White Rural Schools — Continued. 



Number 

of 

Rural 

White 

Schools. 



Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Columbus - . 

Craven 

Cumberland . 
Currituck... 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe. 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson... 
Hertford . . . 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 



Rural 
White 
School 
Popula- 
tion. 



Land 
Area of 

the 
County. 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Onlv 

One 

Teacher. 



79 


4,781 




54 


4,655 


451 


19 


1,142 


161 


17 


1,435 


185 


76 


6,886 


485 


89 


6,190 


937 


47 


2,261 


685 


72 


5,058 


1,008 


34 


1,810 


^73 


19 


1,500 


405 


90 


6.728 


563 


42 


3,595 


264 


74 


4,994 


830 


28 


3,865 


284 


39 


2,248 


' 515 


80 


7,143 


369 


45 


3,317 


471 


67 


8,713 


359 


31 


1,940 


356 


25 


1,714 


302 


53 


3,547 


504 


32 


2,213 


258 


85 


9,094 


674 


50 


2,422 


681 


61 


5,169 


596 


54 


5,194 


541 


49 


4,498 


362 


34 


2,187 


339 


28 


1,649 


596 


92 


6,795 


592 


43 


4,165 


494 


09 


9,935 


688 


26 


1,508 


403 


3fi 


1,968 




41 


2,313 


436 



Numlaer 
of Rural 
Schools 
Having 
Two or 
More 
Teachers. 



Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 
Some High 
j School 
j Subjects 

Taught. 



70 
46 
17 
15 
36 
64 
40 
56 

26 1 
13 I 
75 
36 
61 
11 
32 
59 
31 
50 
22 
21 
28 

27 I 
50 

I 

45 

44 

34 I 

34 : 

29 

23 

58! 

29 

90 ! 

20 

30 

30 



2 

2 

40 

25 

7 
16 

8 

6 
15 

6 
13 
17 

21 

14 

17 

9 

4 

25 

5 

35 

5 

17 

20 

15 

5 

5 

34 
14 
19 
6 
6 
11 



10 

2 

17 

16 

22 

6 
19 

3 

8 
13 

5 

10 
24 



10 
6 
2 

24 
3 

13 

■1 

ti 

8 

5 

7 

9 

,20 

20 

12 

12 

7 

17 



Kinds of Rural Schools^ 1909-'10, 



20' 



Table XII. Number of Colored Rural Schools — Continued. 



Number 


Kural 


of 


White 


llural 


Scliool 


White 


Popula- 


Schools. 


tion. 



Laud 

Area of 

the 

Couuty. 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Only 

One 

Teacher. 



Number 
of Rural 
SchooLs 
Having 
Two or 
More 
Teachers. 



Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 

Some High 

School 

Subjects 

Are 
Jlaught. 



IJncoln 

Macon . . 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg- . 

Mitchell 

Montgomery. - 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover. 
Northampton . 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans. -- 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. _ 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania. 
Tyrrell . 



.59 


5,038 


296 


57 


3,773 


531 


69 


7,834 


431 


43 


2,457 


438 


54 


4,773 


437 


70 


0,737 


590 


70 


5,680 


362 


60 


3,519 


489 


64 


3,772 




.54 


4,522 


584 


14 


828 


199 


41 


2,825 


523 


52 


3,185 


645 


42 


3,003 


386 ; 


23 


2,128 


358 


21 


1,249 


231 


42 


2,223 


883 


29 


1,514 


251 


46 


3,003 


386 , 


80 


6,320 


644 


32 


2,145 


258 


97 


7,495 


795 


35 


2,433 


466 : 


81 


7,276 


1,043 


72 


7,438 


573 


83 


8,057 


483 


78 


7,229 


547 


88 


4,934 


921 


23 


1,880 


387 


63 


4,644 


413 


67 


6,292 


472 


89 


8,306 


531 


46 


3,166 


560 i 


30 


2,133 


371 


25 


1,017 


397 



41 
49 
57 
39 
39 
40 
50 
54 
57 
30 

9 
21 
44 
25 

8 
18 
38 
25 
42 
57 
29 
75 
28 
49 
46 
42 
57 
62 
21 
45 
47 
70 
40 
23 
23 



18 

8 
12 

4 
15 
30 
20 

6 

7 
24 

5 I 

8 i 
17 i 
15 I 

3 [. 

4 

2 

4 
.23 

3 - 

! 

22 I 

7 

32 
26 
41 
21 
26 

2 I. 

I 

18 
20 
19 

6 

7 

2 



24 

4 
12 
11 
15 
30' 

2 

8 
30 
6 
20 
4 
6 
9 



a 
2 

28 

6 

7 
26 

7 
20 
15 
18 

8 
7 

14 
2 

7 



208 



Kinds of Rural Schools^ 1909-'10. 



Table XII. Number of White Rural Schools — Continued. 



Number 


Rural 


of 


White 


Rural 


School 


White 


Popula 


Schools. 


tiou. 



Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington. 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Totals 



Land 
Area of 

the 
Countj'. 



84 
23 
85 
34 
26 
71 
65' 



7,161 
1,671 
7.580 
2,252 
1,295 
4,996 
4,428 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Only 

One 

Teacher. 



561 
276 
841 
432 
334 
330 
597 



52 
9 
46 
26 
25 
60 
54 



Number 
of Rural 
Schools 
Having 
Two or 
■More 
Teachers. 



32 

14 

39 

8 

1 

11 
11 



Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 

Some High 

School I 

Subjects 

Taught. 



14 
12 
17 
S 
1 
7 
8 



124 


9,319 


718 


99 


25 


23 


49 


3,811 


392 


35 


14 


6 


54 


4,850 


334 


39 


15 


6 


49 


4,399 


302 


42 : 


7 ... 




5,373 


416,251 


48,580 


4,018 


1,355 


1,041 



Kinds of RuRxVl Schools^ 1909-'10. 



209 



TABLE XIII. NUMBER OF COLORED RURAL SCHOOLS, ETC., 1909-'10. 

This table shows tlu^ number of colored rural schools, the school population 
and the land area of the counties, the number of colored rural schools having 
only one teacher, the number of colored rural schools having two or more 
teachers, and the number of colored rural schools in which some high-school 
subjects are taught. 

SuMMAKY OF Table XIII and Comparison with 1908-'09. 



Colored. 


1908-'09. 


1909-'10. 


Increase. 


Number of colored rural schools 


2,280 


2,272 


*8 


Cnlnrpd rural school DODulation - 


187,998 


189,421 


1,423 




48,580 


48,580 




ATTPrnsTP nrpn cnvprpfi hv pa,oh rural school 


21.3 


21.3 




School nonulation to pach school » _ _- 


82 


83 


1 


Number of schools having only one teacher. 


2,088 


2,085 


*3 


Number of schools having two or more teachers 


192 


187 


*5 


Number of schools in which some high-school subjects 
are taught. 


93 


57 


*36 



Alamance 

Alexan der 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe = 

Beaufort 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

♦Decrease. 

Part 11—14 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Colored 

Schools. 


Rural 
Colored 
School 
Popula- 
tion. 


26 


1,949 


6 


298 


3 


167 


41 


4,354 


10 


225 


33 


2,653 


55 


4,455 


47 


3,196 


26 


1,775 


17 


947 


9 


663 


23 


1,671 


13 


367 


12 


860 


5 


714 


39 


2,825 


16 


819 



Land 
Area of 

the 
County. 


Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Only 

One 

Teacher. 


494 


25 


297 


6 


223 


3 


551 


39 


399 


9 


. 819 


32 


712 


52 


1,013 


47 


812 


25 


624 


15 


534 


9 


387 


23 


507 


13 


218 


12 


538 


5 


396 


38 


408 


16 



Number 
of Rural 
Schools 
Having 
Two or 
More 
Teachers. 



i Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 

Some High 

School 

Subjects 

Are 
Taught. 



210 



Kinds of Rural Schools^ 1909-'10. 



Table XIII. Number of Colored Rural Schools — Continued. 



Chatham 

Cherokee 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Columbus . - 

Craven 

Cumberland . 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe - 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood... 
Henderson.. 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Colored 

Schools. 



Rural 
Colored 
School 
Popula- 
tion. 



37 

2 
15 

1 

23 
38 
33 
56 
14 

1 

17 
11 
40 
16 
35 
21 
40 
30 
23 

1 
42 
21 
31 
59 
32 



10 
33 

20 

30 

3 

37 
21 
17 
24 



2,911 

96 

1,703 

65 

1,529 

3,204 

2,595 

4,163 

1,047 

169 

711 

856 

3,119 

2,228 

4,529 

1,942 

3,170 

2,535 

1,941 

47 

3,501 

2,057 

2,576 

6,734 

2,336 



Land 
Area of 

the 
County. 



403 
3,208 
1,442 
2,203 

219 
3,349 
1,490 
1,254 
1,801 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Only 

One 

Teacher. 



451 
161 
185 
485 
937 
685 
1,008 
273 
405 
563 
264 
830 
284 
515 
369 
471 
359 
356 
302 
504 
258 
674 
681 
596 
541 
362 
339 
596 
592 
494 
688 
403 
248 
436 



I Number 

! of Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Two or 

More 

Teachers. 



34 

2 

10 

1 

18 
37 
28 
53 
12 



16 
10 
36 
14 
35 
18 
36 
28 
22 
1 
41 
18 
27 
55 
28 



Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 

Some High 

School 

Subjects 

Are 
Taught. 



8 
25 
20 
27 

2 
31 
17 
13 
24 



3 
1 

6 . 
4 . 

41 



HI* 



Kinds of Kubal Schools^ 1909-'10. 

Table XIII. Nujvibkk of Colored Rural Schools — Continued. 



211 



Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg- 
Mitchell 

Montgomery. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 
Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank.. 

Pender 

Perquimans.. 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. 

Rowan 

Rutherford . _ 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania 
Tyrrell 





Number 

of 

Rural 

Colored 

Schools. 


1 

Rural 
Colored 
School 
Popula- 
tion. 


Land 
Area of 

the 
County. 


Number 

of 

Rural I 

Schools 

Having 

Only ; 

One 

Teacher. 


Number 

of Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Two or 

More 

Teachers. 


Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 

Some High 

School 

Subjects 

Art* 
Taught. 


__J 11 

4 1 


848 
209 
163 
2,642 
400 
5,480 

87. 

1.147 

2,192 

3,096 

931 

3,941 

1,524 

1,834 

1,338 

1,353 

2,579 

1,593 

2,347 

5,640 

421 

1,060 

2,742 

6,828 

2,842 

2,269 

1,659 

2,961 

2,655 

735 

938 

716 

204 

260 

607 


296 
531 
431 
438 
437 
590 
362 
489 


10 
4 

4 

22 

f 
10 

53 

2 

18 

27 

35 

11 

38 

13 

20 

9 

14 

34 

14 

32 

49 

9 

19 

19 

57 

30 

35 

44 
21 
9 
9 
13 
4 
1 
9 


1 


2 




4 
26 

15! 


1 






4 
2 


4 






r,^ 


4 




2 
19 
29 
41 
12 
42 
19 
21 
13 
14 








1 

2 
6 
1 
4 
6 
1 
4 










584 
199 
523 
645 
386 
358 
231 
883 
251 
386 
644 
258 
795 
466 
1,043 
573 
483 
547 
921 
387 
413 
472 
531 
560 
371 
397 


2 








3 












1 








1 36 


2 
4 







18 
32 
51 
10 
19 
22 

! 64 

1 

32 

38 

21 

45 

22 

10 

10 

'' 13 

4 

2 

9 


2 




2 
1 


2 








1 




3 

7 
2 
3 
2 

1 

1 
1 
1 






10 
















1 


























1 









212 



Kinds of Rukal Schools, 1909-'10. 



Table XIII. Number of Colored Rural Schools — Continued. 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Colored 

Schools. 



Union 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington.. 
Watauga . . _ . 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Totals 



40 [ 

22 

61 

41 

18 

4 
38 
17 
25 

9 

2 



Rural 
Colored 
School 
Popula- 
tion. 



3,119 
2,584 
5,757 
4,386 
1,234 

90 

2,896 

914 

2,551 

433 

95 



2,272 ! 189,421 



Land 
Area of 

the 
County. 



Number 

of 

Rural 

Schools 

Having 

Only 

One 

Teacher. 



561 

276 

841 

432 

334 

330 I 

597 

718 

392 

334 

302 



48,580 



39 

17 

52 

40 

17 

4 

35 

14 

23 

9 

2 



2,085 



Number 
of Rural 
Schools 
Having 
Two; or 
More 
Teachers. 



Number of 

Rural 
Schools in 

Which 

Some High 

School 

Subjects 

Are 
Taught . 



187 



57 



F. TEACHERS. 



TABLE XIV. NUMBER AND SEX OF TEACHERS EMPLOYED, 1909-'10. 

This table shows, by races, the uumber and sex of the public-school teachers, 
rnral and city, emi)loyed during 1909-'10. 

SuMWAKY OF Table XIV and Comparison with 1908-'09. 



Total number teachers employed, 1909-10 
Total number teachers employed, 1908-09 

Increase 

White teachers, 1909-' 10 

White teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

Colored teachers, 1909-' 10 j . . 

Colored teachers. 1908-'09 

Increase 

White men employed, 1909-'10 

White men employed, 1908-09 

Increase 

White women employed, 1909-10 

White women employed, 1908-09 . 

Increase 

Colored men employed, 1909-10 

Colored men employed, 1908-09 

Increase 

Colored women employed, 1909-'10 

Colored women employed, 1908-'09 

Increase 



Rural. 



9,513 

9,370 

143 

7,113 

6,926 

187 

2,400 

2,444 

*44 

2,137 

2,167 

*30 

4,976 

4,759 

217 

766 

833 

*67 

1,634 

1,611 

23 



City. 



1,703 

1,587 

116 

1,309 

1,203 

106 

394 

384 

10 

180 

141 

39 

1,129 

1,062 

67 

102 

103 

*1 

292 

281 

11 



North 
Carolina. 



11,216 

10,957 

259 

8.422 

8,129 

293 

2,794 

2,828 

*34 

2,317 

2,308 

9 

6,105 

5,821 

284 

868 

936 

*68 

1,926 

1,892 

34 









White. 






Colored. 






















"•0 


























-■ 


11 




a 


■3 0) 


^ cu 








6 




a 


S 


tS 


03 




•— 




o 


■5.^ CS 





■s° =« 


•^•a cs 




S 




^ 




^ 


^ 


<D 


r- <V 


Alamance 




23 


103 


126 


14 


19. 


33 


159 


Rural 




19 


65 


84 


11 


16 


27 


111 


Burlington- _ -- - 




1 


19 


20 


1 


1 


2 


22 


Graham 




1 
1 

1 


10 
5 
4 


11 
6 
5 


1 


1 


2 


13 


Haw River . 


6 


Mebane 


1 


1 


2 


7 



♦Decrease. 



214 



Teachers, 1909-'10. 



Table XIV. Number and Sex of Teachers Employed — Continued. 





White. 




Colored. 






1 


3 


] 

53 
g 
o 


■_ 1 


S 


53 

e 

o 


V-. a> 

So^ : 

O O D 


Total White 
and Colored 
Teachers. 


Alexander _ _ - 


44 1 

38 

14 

13 

1 

104 

24 

19 

3 

2 

7 

5 

1 

1 

18 
21 
65 
58 
7 
20 
19 
1 

33 

29 

4 

37 

33 

2 

1 

1 

7 

12 

2 

55 

52 

1 

2 


20 
16 
48 
39 

1 

9 

14 
90 
64 
22 

4 

78 
68 

5 

5 
61 
25 
137 
78 
59 
54 
42 
12 

Vo 

47 
23 
72 
54 
12 
5 
1 

18 
21 
36 
77 
59 
7 
11 


64 
54 
62 
52 
10 
118 
114 
83 
25 
6 
85 
73 
6 
6 
79 
46 
202 
136 
66 
74 
61 
13 
103 
76 
27 
109 
87 
14 
6 
2 
25 
33 
38 
132 
111 
8 
i 13 


4 

3 

10 

9 

9! 

) 

14 
12 

1 

1 

17 
16 


2 


6 

3 

43 

40 

3 

10 

45 

36 

7 

2 

60 

56 


70 


AlleEhanv - - 


57 


Anson 


33 

31 

2 

1 

31 

24 

6 

1 

43 
40 


105 


Rural - - -- 


92 


Wadesboro - - 


13 


Ashe - -- 


128 


Beaufort -I ...._ 


159 


Rural -. - - - 


119 


Washington. - . 


32 


Belhaven ._-_-_ 


8 


Bertie - 


145 


Rural 


129 


A\ilander 


6 


Windsor- _ _ 


1 

19 
10 
7 
5 
2 
7 
5 
2 
4 
2 
2 
8 
6 
2 


3 

28 

13 

26 

12 

14 

5 

4 

1 

24 

20 

4 

8 

7 

1 


4 

47 
23 
33 
17 
16 
12 

9 
3 

28 
22 

6 
16 
13 

3 



10 


Bladen - -_. - 


126 


Brunswick 


69 


Buncombe 


235 


Rural 

Asheville 


153 
82 


Burke 


86 


Rural 

Morganton . - - 

Cabarrus . _ _ 


70 

Iti 

131 


Rural 

Concord 


98 
33 


Caldwell- _ - _ 


12.5 


Rural - - _ 


100 


Lenoir - - __ 


17 


Granite 


6 


Rhodhiss 









2 


Camden 

Carteret _ - . 


4 
1 

8 
10 

8 

1 
1 


8 

■ 4 

31 

11 

8 

1 
2 


12 

5 

39 

21 

16 

2 

! 3 


' 37 
38 


Caswell. .-- .- 


77 


Catawba - 


153 


Rural - 

Newton -- 


127 
10 


Hickorv - - 


16 



Teachers, 1909-'10. 



215 



Table XIV. Number and Sex of Teachers Employed — Continued. 



Chatham 

Cherokee r. 

Rural 

Murphy 

Andrews 

Chowan 

Rural 

Edenton 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Rural 

Shelby 

Kings Mountain. 

Columbus 

Craven 

Rural 

New Bern 

Cumberland 

Rural 

Fayetteville 

Hope Mills 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson _-• 

Rural 

Lexington 

Thomasville 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham _ 

Rural 

Durham 

Edgecombe 

Rural . 

Tarboro 



White. 






34 

45 

40 

1 

4 

2 

1 

1 

8 

36 

35 

1 



40 

12 

8 

4 

21 

17 

3 

1 

5 

15 

66 

64 

1 

1 

19 

14 

24 

11 

13 

6 

3 

3 



0) 

S 
o 



51 
48 
34 

4 
10 
27 
20 

7 

11 

104 

84 

11 

9 
81 
72 
49 
23 
99 
84 
12 

3 

39 
18 
68 
47 
13 

8 
35 
85 
94 
44 
50 
58 
46 
12 






85 

93 

74 

5 

14 

29 

21 

8 

19 

140 

119 

12 

9 

121 

84 

57 

27 

120 

101 

15 

4 

44 

33 

134 

111 

14 

9 

54 

99 

118 

55 

63 

64 

49 

15 



Colored. 



1) 



19 
1 
1 



10 
7 
2 
1 

10 
13 
10 
3 
21 
19 
2 



CQ 

O O <D 



20 
3 
2 



1 

16 

15 

1 

1 

16 

15 

1 



30 

32 

26 

6 

44 
40 ' 

4! 



39 
4 
3 



1 

23 
22 

1 

1 
26 
22 

3 

1 
40 
45 
36 

9 

65 
59 

6 



o ^ Oi 



6 


10 


16 


1 


1 


2 


12 


11 


23 


10 


8 


18 


1 


2 


3 


1 


1 


2 


4 


7 


11 


11 


35 


46 


6 


39 


45 


4 


14 


18 


2 


25 


27 


14 


28 


42 


12 


23 


35 


2 


5 


7 



124 
97 
77 
5 
15 
52 
43 
9 

20 

166 

141 

15 

10 

161 

129 

93 

36 

185 

160 

21 

4 

60 

35 

157 

129 

17 

11 

65 

145 

163 

73 

90 

106 

84 

22 



216 



Teachers, 1909-'10. 



Table XIV. Number and Sex of Teachers Employed — Conlinued. 



Forsyth 

Rural 

Winston^ 

Franklin 

Rural 

Franklinton 

Louisburg 

Youngsville 

Gaston 

Rural 

Gastonia. _ - 
Cherry ville_ . . 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Rural 

Oxford 

Greene 

Guilford . - - - 

Riu-al _ - - 

Greensboro 

High Point 

Guilford College . 

Halifax 

Rural - ^ 

Scotland Neck_^_ 

Weldoii - - 

Enfield 

Roanoke Rapids. 

Harnett 

Rural - - 

Dunn ' 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville 



White. 






44 

38 
6 

12 
8 
1 
2 
1 

27 

23 
2 
2 
4 

11 
8 
6 
2 
3 

35 

24 
6 
4 



29 
28 

1 
40 
38 

2 



S 
o 



107 

71 

36 

69 I 

57 ' 

5 

4 

3 

115 

92 

17 

6 

39 

18 

86 

77 

9 

35 

188 

116 

49 

21 

2 

83 

54 

8 

8 

7 

6 

62 

53 

9 

39 

30 

9 



73 .-So 



Colored. 



151 

109 

42 

81 

65 

6 

6 

4 

142 

115 

19 

8 

43 

29 

94 

83 

11 

38 

223 

140 

55 

25 

3 

88 

55 

9 

9 

8 

7 

91 

81 

10 

79 

68 

11 






15 

12 

3 

15 

10 

2 

1 

2 

14 

13 

1 



4 
1 

10 
9 
1 
9 

15 
7 
2 

6 



20 

17 
1 
1 
1 



II 
11 



s 

O 



24 
12 
12 
36 
32 
1 
3 



22 

19 

3 



20 



38 

34 

4 

16 

40 

28 

8 

4 



~ a) 
o o ai 

39 

24 

15 

51 

42 

3 

4 

2 

36 

32 

4 



45 

39 

1 

2 

2 

1 

21 

21 



24 
1 
48 
43 
5 
25 
55 
35 
10 
10 



65 
56 
2 
3 
3 
1 

32 
32 



O r- Oi 

H 5H 



190 

133 

57 

132 

107 

9 

10 

6 

178 

147 

23 

8 

67 

30 

142 

126 

16 

63 

278 

175 

65 

35 

3 

153 

111 

11 

12 

11 

8 

123 

113 

10 

' 82 

68 

14 



Teachers, 1909-'] 0. 



217 



Table XIV. Number and Sex of Teachers Employed — Continued. 



Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville 

Statesville 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

Smithfleld 

Jones 

I^e 

Rural 

Sanford 

Lenoir 

Rural - 

Kinston 

LaGrange 

Lincoln 

Rural 

Lincolnton 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

Rural 

Williaraston 

Robersonville - 

McDowell 

Rural . - 

Marion 

Mecklenburg 

Rural 

Charlotte 



White. 



a) 
S 



30 

29 

1 

4 

9 

54 

51 

1 

2 

25 

46 

44 

1 

1 

4 

4 

3 

1 

14 
8 
5 
1 

23 

22 

1 

22 
38 
12 
10 
1 
1 

19 

18 

1 

30 

22 

8 



c 

B 
o 



46 
38 

8 
32 
26 
98 
75 
11 
12 
44 
86 
76 

5 

5 

22 
45 
36 

9 
68 
44 
18 

6 
67 
56 
11 
45 
50 
45 
37 

4 

4 
60 
51 

9 

163 

89 

74 






76 

67 

9 

36 

35 

152 

126 

12 

14 

69 

132 

120 

6 

6 

26 

49 

39 

10 

82 

52 

23 

7 

90 

78 

12 

67 

88 

57 

47 

5 

5 

79 

69 

10 

193 

111 

82 



Colored. 






o 



3 
2 

i 

10 

3 

15 

13 

1 

1 

1 

14 

12 

1 

1 

11 
5 
5 



16 
14 
1 
1 
5 
5 



1 
2 
14 
12 
1 
1 
1 
1 



O o a> 



10 

8 

2 
31 
16 
22 
19 

1 

2 

3 
28 
25 

1 ' 

2 
12 
16 I 
16 



15 

10 

4 

1 

9 

7 

2 

3 

2 

20 

18 



13 

10 

3 

41 

19 

37 

32 

2 

3 

4 

42 

37 

2 

3 

23 
21 
21 



31 

24 

5 

2 

14 

12 

2 

4 

4 

34 

30 

3 

1 

10 
10 



Si ^ • 

O e OJ 



10 
9 
1 



68 
44 
24 



78 
53 
25 



89 

77 

12 

77 

54 

189 

158 

14 

17 

73 

174 

157 

8 

9 

49 

70 

60 

10 

113 

76 

28 

9 

104 

90 

14 

71 

92 

91 

77 

S 

6 

89 

79 

10 

271 

1C4 

107 



218 



Teacheks, 1909-'10. 



Table XIV. Number and Sex of Teachers Employed — Continued. 



Mitchell 

Montgoinery 

Rural 

Troy 

Moore 

Rural 

Carthage 

Southern Pines - 

Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount - _ 

New Hanover 

Rural 

Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

RMral 

Elizabeth City. 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 

Person 

Rural 

Roxboro 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville 

Polk 

Randolph. _ 

Rural 

Ashboro 

Randleman 



White. 


Colored. 




Men. 


a 






o 


O O Oi 


.ti a; 


30 


60 


90 


1 

1 3 


4 


94 


19 


47 


66 


6 


16 


22 


88 


18 


44 


62 


5 


13 


18 


80 


1 


3 


4 


1 3 


4 


8 


18 


77 


95 


10 i 21 


31 


126 


16 


69 


85 


10 21 


31 


116 


1 

1 
16 


5 
3 

94 


6 

4 

110 






6 





4 


10 38 


48 


1.58 


14 


70 


84 


8 33 


41 


125 


2 


24 


26 


2 


5 


7 


33 


4 


66 


70 


3 


32 


35 


105 


1 


18 


19 


1 


12 


13 


32 


3 


48 


51 


2 


20 


22 


73 


14 


55 


69 


17 


34 


51 


120 


15 


55 


70 


10 


9 


19 


89 


12 


47 


59 


6 


17 


23 


82 


16 


28 


44 


6 


13 


19 


63 


9 


39 


48 


2 


20 


22 


70 


6 


18 


24 


1 


14 


15 


39 


3 


21 


24 


1 


6 


7 


31 


9 


44 


53 


9 


30 


39 


92 


3 


33 


36 


12 


13 


25 


61 


2 


27 


29 


11 


11 


22 


51 


1 


6 


7 


1 


2 


3 


10 


6 


52 


58 


4 


31 


35 


93 


4 


44 


48 


3 


29 


32 


80 


2 


8 


10 


1 


2 


3 


13 


7 


140 


147 


26 


20 


56 


203 


6 


127 


133 


25 


26 


51 


184 


1 


13 


14 


1 


4 


5 


19 


12 


20 


32 


3 


1 


4 


36 


53 


95 


148 


10 


10 


20 


168 


51 


79 


130 


9 


^' 


18 


148 


1 


9 


10 


1 


I 


2 


12 


1 


7 


8 








8 



Teacheks, 1909-'10. 



21 !> 



Table XIV. Number and Sex of Teachers Employed — Continued. 



Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham. 
Hamlet 

Robeson 

Rural 

Maxton 

Rockingham _ _ 

Rural 

Reidsville 

Rowan 

Rural 

Salisbury 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 

Scotland 

Rural 

Laurinburg.. 

Stanly 

Rural 

Albemarle 

Stokes 

Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy. 

Swain 

Transylvania. . 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Rural 

Monroe 

Vance 

Rural 

Henderson . _ 





White. 






Colored. 


■ 




Men. 


53 

a 

o 


CO 

f-l 




33 

s 

o 


O O 0) 

HUH 


H5H 


12 


48 


60 


14 


14 


28 


88 


10 


36 


46 


12 


12 


24 


70 


1 


7 


8 


1 


1 


2 


10 


1 


5 


6 


1 


1 


2 


8 


32 


90 


122 


23 


42 


65 


187 


31 


85 


116 


22 


41 


63 


179 


1 


5 


6 


1 


1 


2 


8 


15 


108 


123 


20 


23 


43 


166 


12 


96 


108 


17 


18 


35 


143 


3 


12 


15 


3 


5 


8 


23 


46 


108 


154 


17 


30 


47 


201 


42 


88 


130 


15 


26 


41 


171 


4 


20 


24 


2 


4 


6 


30 


25 


80 


105 


3 


16 


19 


124 


30 


95 


125 


17 


35 


52 


177 


29 


89 


118 


15 


33 


48 


166 


1 


6 


7 


2 


2 


4 


H 


5 


29 


34 


12 


17 


29 


63 


3 


22 


25 


8 


15 


23 


48 


2 


7 


9 


4 


2 


6 


15 


50 


48 


98 


5 


6 


• 11 


109 


49 


39 


88 


5 


6 


11 


99 


1 

27 


9 
63 


10 
90 








10 


3 


7 


10 


100 


34 


90 


124 


5 


10 


15 


139 


33 


78 


111 


4 


9 


13 


124 


1 


12 


13 


1 


1 


2 


15 


25 


30 


55 


1 


3 


4 


.59 


9 

8 


33 
14 


42 

22 




1 
6 


1 
9 


43 


3 


3! 


45 


88 


133 


17 


25 


42 


175 


42 


76 


118 


i 16 


23 


39 


157 


3 


12 


15 


1 


2 


3 


18 


4 


56 


60 


5 


28 


33 


93 


2 


• 39 


41 


i 4 


20 


24 


65 


2 


17 


19 


1 


8 


9 


28 



220 



Teachers, 1909-'10. 



Table XIV. Number and Sex of Teachers Employed — Continued. 



White. 



Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth [ 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive 

Fremont 

Wilkes 

Rural 

North Wilkesboro 

Wilson 

Rural 

Wilson City 

Lucama 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

North Carolina 2, 

Rural 2, 

City 1 



34 

29 
5 
4 
9 
7 
1 
1 

45 

17 

12 
2 
1 
2 

91 

88 
3 

17 

12 
4 : 
li 

35 

32 I 
317 
137 
180 



c 

s 

o 



01 



Colored. 



163 

110 

53 

48 

28 

20 

3 

5 

36 

104 

71 

23 

5 

5 

77 

72 

5 

83 

62 

18 

3 

39 
27 




197 

139 

58 

52 

37 

27 

4 

6 

81 

121 

83 

25 

6 

7 

168 

160 

8 

100 

74 

22 

4 

74 

59 



0) 



8.422 
7,113 
1.309 



28 
25 
3 
4 
9 
8 



1 
1 

11 
5 
3 
2 
1 
11 
10 
1 
7 
6 
1 



o 



o o <u 



868 
766 
102 



1,926 

1,634 

292 



^ o <u 
o C * 



80 


108 


305 


55 


80 


219 


25 


28 


86 


42 


46 


98 


17 


26 


63 


12 


20 


47 


2 


2 


6 


3 


4 


10 


2 


3 


1 84 


47 


58 


179 


35 


40 


123 


9 


12 


37 


2 


4 


10 


1 


2 


9 


12 


23 


191 


11 


21 


181 


1 


2 


10 


32 


39 


139 


21 


27 


101 


9 


10 


32 


2 


2 


6 


3 


9 


83 


2 


3 


62 



2,794 

2,400 

394 



11,216 
9,513 
1.703 



Teachers, 190!)-' 10. 



221 



TABLE XV. SCHOLARSHIP OF WHITE TEACHERS, 1909-'10. 

This table shows the grade of scholarsliip of rural white teachers employed 
during the j^ear, as reported by the county superintendents, also something of 
the training and experience of all white teachers, rural and city, and the num- 
ber of teachers employed in local-tax districts, not including those in city 
schools. 

Summary of Table XV and Comparison with 1908- '09. 



Total white teachers, 1909-' 10 

Total white teachers, 1908-09 

Increase 

First grade, 1909-'10 

First grade, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Second grade, 1909-10 

Second grade, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Third grade, 1909-10 

Third grade, 1908-09 

Increase 

Number having normal training, 1909-' 10 

Number having normal training, 1908-09 

Increase 

Number having four years' experience, 1909-10 

Number having four years' experience, 1908-09 

Increase 

Number holding college diploma, 1909-' 10 

Number holding college diploma, 1908-09 

Increase 

Number teachers employed in local-tax districts 

1909-'10. 
Number teachers employed in local-tax districts 

1908-'09. 

Increase 



Rural. 



7,113 

6,926 

187 

5,530 

5,355 

175 

1,500 

1,458 

42 

71 

113 

*42 

1,986 

1,833 

153 

3,129 

2,977 

152 

982 

927 

55 

1,739 

1,436 

303 



City. 



1,309 

1,203 

106 



729 
734 

*5 
932 
793 
139 
737 
682 

55 



North 
Carolina. 



8,422 
8,129 

293 
5,530 
5,355 

175 

1,500 

1,458 

42 

71 

113 

*42 
2,715 
2,567 

148 
4,061 
3,770 

291 
1,719 
1,609 

110 
1,739 
1,436 

303 



♦Decrease. 



'>,99. 



Teachers, 1909-'10. 



Table XV. Scholarship of White Teachers — Continued. 





Total Number of 
Teachers. 


First Grade. 


6 

o 

§ 

m 


Third Grade. 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 


Number Having 
Normal Training. 


Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. 


Number Holding 
College Diploma. 


Alamance 

Rural 

Burlington- - - _----. 


126 
84 
20 
11 

6 

5 

64 

54 

62 

52 

10 

118 

114 

83 

25 

6 

85 

73 

6 

6 

79 

46 

202 

136 

66 

74 

61 

13 

103 

76 

27 

109 

87 

14 

6 

2 


62 
62 


22 
22 




29 
29 


54 

37 

5 

6 

4 

2 

6 

30 

31 

27 

4 

44 

28 

19 

7 

2 

27 

20 

4 

3 

13 

11 

100 

61 

39 

11 


59 
39 
14 



3 
3 

27 
21 
26 
19 

7 
43 
55 
31 
20 

4 
35 
31 

4 
44 
44 
128 
71 
54 
25 
13 
12 
68 
44 
24 
75 
58 
12 

5 


34 
11 
11 


Graham- .. -. 








7 


Haw River - 










3 


Mebane - - -- - 








■ 


2 


.\lexander 

Alleghanv- - 


43 
35 
49 
49 


19 

19 

3 

3 


2 


10 


6 
1 


xVnson ..- 




15 

15 


8 


Rural - 


3 


Wadesboro .-- _- 


5 


Ashe 


95 

77 

77 


231 
5 
5 


1 
1 


6 
14 
14 




Beaufort ^ - 

Rural ----- 


19 
4 


Washington 


15 


Belhaven-- - _ 












Bertie 


62 
62 


11 
11 




14 
14 


13 


Rural 

Aulander .- _.- 


9 
2 


Wmdsor 










2 


Bladen- _- - - 


73 

38 

126 

126 


6 

8 

10 

10 




14 
6 

50 
50 


17 


Brunswick 


11 


Buncombe - - 


76 


Rural -- 


41 


Ashevillc- - ---- --- 


35 


Burke 


18 

18 


43 
43 






4 


Rural . - 






1 


Morganton 






11 
26 
13 
13 
98 
83 
10 
5 


3 


Cabarrus. 


62 
62 


12 
12 


2 
2 


10 
10 


24 


Rural . - - - 


9 


Concord --_ -- 


15 


Caldwell 


45 
45 


42 
42 






28 


Rural 






11 


I^enoir - _ 






12 


Granite _ - -- 


! 
1 






5 


Rhodhiss 


1 

I 

j 









Teachees, 1909-'10. 



223 



Table XV. Scholarship of White Teachers — Continued. 



Camden 

Carteret 

Caswell 

Ciitawba 

Rural 

Newton 

Hickory 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Rural 

Murphy 

Andrews 

Chowan 

Rural 

Edenton 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Rural 

Shelby 

Kings Mountain- 
Columbus 

Craven 

Rural 

New Bern 

Cumberland 

Rural 

Fayetteville 

Hope Mills 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Rural 

Lexington 

Thomasville 

Davie 

Duplin 




25 


23 


t 2 




11 


33 


28 


5 


; 3 


38 


32 


6 


j 10 


132 


90 


16 


5 ' 39 


111 


90 


16 5 


39 


8' 




. 




13 










85 


71 


14 




16 

1 


93 


45 


20 


9 


19 


74 


45 


20 


9 


19 


5 










14 










29 


18 


3 




2 


21 


18 


3 




2 


8 








1 


19 


19 

98 






3 

23 


140 


14 


7 


119 


98 


14 ' 7 


23 

f 


12 








1 


9 










121 


87 


34 




63 


84 


41 


16 




10 


57 


41 


16 




10 ' 


27 


















> ' 


120 


84 


17 




29 


101 


84 


17 




29 


15 










4 










44 


39 


4 


1 


31 


33 


29 


4 




31 


134 


80 


27 


4 


2 


111 


80 


27 


4 


2; 


14 






• 




9 








i 


54 


40 


14 




11 [ 


99 


87 


12 




31 



8 


9 


6 


14 


19 


5 


28 


23 


17 


22 


75 


34 


11 


68 


20 


5 


7 


6 


6 


7 


8 


20 


42 


5 


26 


56 


16 


15 


40 


8 


4 


4 


4 


7 


12 


4 


13 


21 


9 


9 


13 


5 


4 


8 


4 


2 


7 


2 


39 


74 


27 


27 


62 


12 


9 


10 


' 9 


3 


2 - 


6 


46 


47 


18 


11 


51 


16 


8 


28 


5 


3 


23 


11 


36 


37 


27 


20 


21 


19 


12 


12 


6 


4 


4 


2 


15 


24 


5 


16 


11 


2 


24 


73 


18 


11 


61 


4 


9 


8 


7 


4 


4 


7 


3 


18 


3 


28 


36 


9 



224 



Teachers, 1909-'10. 



Table XV. Scholarship of White Teachers — Continued. 





Total Number of 
Teachers. 


First Grade. 


Second Grade. 


Third Grade. 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 


Number Having 
Normal Training. 


Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. 


Number Holding 
College Diploma. 


Durham 


118 


51 


4 




24 


104 


80 


83 


Rural 


55 


51 


4 




24 


45 


34 


25 


Durham 


63 
64 










59 
20 


46 
41 


58 


Edgecombe- . _ , . _ _ . . 


45 


4 




12 


18 


Rural 


49 


45 


4 




12 


11 


28 


10 


Tarboro 


15 
151 
109 
42 
81 
65 




t 






9 

54 
31 

23 

15 

6 


13 

82 
59 
23 
* 34 
22 


8 


Forsyth 


77 

77 


30 
30 


2 
2 


5 
5 


41 


Rural- - - 


16 


Winston . 


25 


Franklin .._ _ __ 


60 
60 


5 
5 




13 
13 


14 


Rural 


8 


Franklin t on - 


6 
6 










3 
6 


4 
6 


2 


Louisburg - 


- 








3 


Youngsville 


4 
142 












2 
79 


1 


Gaston.l 


101 


14 




46 


58 


61 


Rural 


115 


101 


14 




46 


43 


62 


45 


Gastonia. 


19 

8 










11 
4 


13 
4 


13 


Cherry ville . 










3 


Gat'es 


43 


30 


13 




13 


12 


19 


7 


Graham 


29 


17 


10 


2 




7 


9 




Granville 


94 


68 


15 




40 


29 


48 


20 


Rural , 


83 


68 


15 




40 


29 


42 


16 


Oxford _ - 


11 

38 

223 

140 

55 

25 

3 

88 

55 

9 

7 












6 
13 
143 
85 
37 
20 

1 
44 
24 

7 

4 


4 


Greene .. 


27 
112 
112 


10 
28 

28 


1 


91 
91 


10 

114 

58 

45 

10 

1 

39 

21 

5 

4 


2 


Guilford 


82 


Rural -- ,- 


25 


Greensboro _ _ 


42 


High Point _ _. 










14 


Guilford College _ _ . 











1 


Halifax ._ ._ 


48 
48 


7 
7 






29 


Rural -_ - -. 






11 


Scotland Neck _ 






6 


Roanoke Rapids - _ _ 


_ - 






3 


Weldon. . 


9 
8 








4 
5 


3 

6 


8 


Enfield 






■ 1 


1 



Teachers, 1909-'10. 



225 



Table XV. Scholarship of White Teachers — Continued. 



Harnett 

Rural 

Dunn 

Haywood 

Rural 

Waynesville _ _ 

Henderson 

Rural 

Hendersonville- 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Rural 

Mooresville 

Statesville 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Rural 

Selma 

Smithfleld 

Jones l„^-_ 

Lee 

Rural 

Sanford 

Lenoir 

Rural 

Kinston 

LaGrange 

Tjncoln 

Rural 

Lincolnton 

Macon.- 

Madison 



O 01 



03 
l-c 

O 



Pm 






o 
o 

m 









\ ^ I 

'S X ! 
t- y 9 to 



91 
81 
10 
79 
68 
11 
76 
67 
9 

36 

35 

152 

126 

12 

14 

69 

132 

120 

6 

6 

26 

49 

39 

10 

82 

52 

23 

7 

90 

78 

12 

67 

88 



48 
48 



49 
49 



48 

48 



69 
114 
114 



12 
28 

28 



49 
49 



54 
54 



32 
32 



15 

15 



3 o 



16 
16 



> 

C !- i 

; 3oX 



So 



18 
18 



19 
19 



17 


19 


31 


4 


105 


20 


105 


20 



14 
10 
10 



19 
19 



28 
28 



1 

17 
24 
24 



31 
45 

45 



22 
22 



38 
62 



26 
26 



17 
12 



18 I 
10 

8 

17 I 

12 i 

5 ' 

14 

i 

3| 

37 : 

21 I 

10 
69 
28 
18 

6 

4 

4 

24 
17 

7 
13 

1 

9 

3 
24 
15 

9 
14 

6 



29 ' 
29 



37 
26 
11 
45 
38 

7 
14 

7 
68 
46 
11 

11 ; 

29 ! 

69 

60 

6 

3 
16 
28 
20 

8 
30 
15 
11 

4 
62 
56 

6 
40 
40 



12 

9 

3 

10 

7 

3 

14 

3 

30 

11 

7 

12 

10 

13 

8 

2 

3 

4 

23 

18 

5 

16 

13 
3 

20 

10 

10 

4 

3 



Part 11—15 



226 



Teacheks, 1909-'10. 



Table XV. Scholarship of White Teachers — Continued. 



Martin 

Rural 

WDliamston 

Robersonville-. 

McDowell 

Rural 

Marion 

Meclilenburg 

Rural 

Charlotte 

Mitchell 

Montgomery- -- 

Rural 

Troy 

Moore 

Rural , 

Carthage 

Southern Pines. 

Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount-- 

New Hanover 

Rural 

Wilmington 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank - 

Rural 

Elizabeth City. 

Pender 



u 



3 M 
O Oj 



57 
47 

5 

5 
79 
69 
10 
193 
111 
82 I 
90 ' 
66 
62 

4 
95 
85 

6 j 

I 

110 
84 
26 
70 
19 
51 
69 
70 
59 
44 
48 
24 
24 
53 





<D 




73 


<v 


C^ 


■a 


f^ 


03 


o 


O 


•a 




c 


2 


8 




li 


fe 


OJ 


35 


12 


35 


12 



39 

39 



91 
91 



00 

45 
45 



72 I 
72 



I 



•a 
O 

3 

Eh 



30 

30 



20 

20 



30 
17 
17 



13 

13 



en 

Xi eS 



33 
33 



C.S 

>.S 
ts ca 

SI? 



d o 



C 
> 

CO ^ 
l-i a^ m 

P ^ S 



19 

14 

5 



51 
51 



20 
20 



68 
68 


16 
16 




29 
29 


19 
19 
















■ 




45 
64 
50 
42 
23 
23 


14. 
6 

9 
2 

1 





12 

18 

3 

19 










52 


1 




44 



43 
30 
10 
19 
14 
5 
55 



23 



26 

21 

5 



49 
40 

9 

115 

45 

70 

45 

2 



37 



21 


33 


1 


1 


1 


3 


34 


45 


15 


i 26 1 


19 


19 


33 


53 ' 


6 


10 


27 


43 


13 


20 


9 


30 ! 


15 


33 


14 


24 


20 


24 


4 


8 


16 


16 


12 


18 



•5p 
25 

.a be 

!2;o 



14 
14 



95 

48 

47 

6 

8 

4 

4 

25 

17 

6 

2 

23 

7 

16 

35 

6 

29 

12 

5 

4 

10 

13 

6 

7 

6 



Teacheks, 1909-'10. 



227 



Table XV. Scholarship of White Teachers — Continued. 



Perquimans 

Rural 

Hertford 

Person _ 

Rural 

Roxboro- 

Pitt 

Rural 

Greenville 

Polk 

Randolph 

Rur§il 

Ashboro 

Randleraau-- 

Richmond 

Rural 

Rockingham. 
Hamlet 

Robeson 

Rural 

Maxtoii 

Rockingham 

Rural 

Reidsville 

Rowan 

Rural 

Salisbury 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Rural 

Clinton 

Scotland 

Rural 

Laurinburg- - 



S . 

3 tn 

^ a; 

O CD 



36 

29 
7 

58 

48 

10 
147 
133 

14 

32 
148 
130 I 

10 
8 

60 

46 



6'- 

122 I 

116 ^ 
6 L 

123 i 
108 

15 1_ 
154 ] 
130 j 

24 
105 
125 
118 

34 

t 
25 i 

9 _ 



0) 



22 
22 



37 
37 



131 
131 



26 
79 
79 



36 
36 



96 

96 

83 
83 

95 
95 

100 

95 
95 

25 
25 



o 
o 






CD y, ■ 
x: cs 

ci E J. 

5E3.iS 



c.S 
>.S 

II 

3 O 



10 
10 



51 1. 

I 

51 . 



10 
10 



20 
20 

25 
25 

34 
34 

5 
23 
23 



25 
25 



4 
44 

44 



64 
64 

14 
14 

19 
19 

23 
52 
52 

2 

9 



C 
> 

tH a^ S 

539- 
2 O K 



■B g 

2 S 

Kg 

l2;o 



14 
11 

3 
20 
14 i 

6 

53 
40 
13 

4 
41 
27 

9 

5 
19 

9 

6 

4 
32 
32 

68 
60 

8 
53 
34 
19 
35 
43 
40 

3 
13 

8 



22 


10 


15 


6 


7 


4 


27 


8 


20 


4 


7 


4 


74 


27 


65 


27 


9 




4 


1 


13 


16 




6 


7 


6 


6 


4 


20 


18 


13 


5 


4 


8 


3 


5 


52 


35 


• 46 


29 


6 


6 


54 


26 


40 


15 


14 


11 


79 


47 


67 


28 


12 


19 


53 


10 


63 


11 


57 


7 


6 


4 


22 


14 


17 


10 


5 


4 



228 



Teachers, 1909-'10. 



Table XV. Scholarship of White Teachers — Continued. 



Stanly 

Rural 

Albemarle 

Stokes 

Surry 

Rural 

Mount Airy 

Swain 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Union 

Rural ^ 

Monroe 

Vance 

Rural 

Henderson 

Wake 

Rural 

Raleigh 

Warren 

Washington 

Rural 

Roper 

Plymouth 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Rural 

Goldsboro 

Mount Olive 

Fremont 

Wilkes 

Rural 

North Wilkesboro. 



o 










M^ 


M 


gee 










Xi c3 


C 


s 

3 tn 


■a 

03 




<5 


^s2 

. <I> O o? 




hi 


2o 






§ 


O 

s 


3 8 3.52 


ii 


B ^H S 

s 3 a 

3 o C! 


3 O 


HH 


fe 


tc 


H 


|2;wrtQ 


^15 


^P>-W 


!z;cS 


98 


54 
54 


34 
34 






21 

14 

7 

29 


24 

18 

6 

34 


21 


88 






12 


10 






9 


90 


60 


27 


3 


7 


7 


124 


70 


41 




20 


36 


34 


29 


111 


70 


41 




20 


30 


26 


18 


13 










6 
11 


8 
18 


u 


55 


27 


25 


3 


9 


3 


■42 


40 


2 




19 


22 


19 


8 


22 


19 


3 




1 


3 


19 




133 


105 


13 




40 


25 


56 


31 


118 


105 


13 




40 


16 


49 


16 


15 










9 
26 


7 
32 


15 


60 


40 


1 




-- 

9 


20 


41 


40 


1 




9 


20 


23 


14 


19 










6 

79 


9 
132 


6 


197 


101 


35 


3 


57 


64 


139 


101 


35 


3 


57 


30 


76 


34 


58 










49 
21 


56 
24 


30 


52 


51 


1 




23 


10 


37 


23 


4 




7 


6 


26 


3 


27 


23 


4 




7 


3 


17 




4 












3 

6 

32 


2 


6 











3 
23 


1 


81 


42 


36 




9 


2 


121 


75 


8 




20 


33 


54 


30 


83 


75 


8 




20 


12 


28 


9 


25 










15 
2 

4 
56 


21 
2 
3 

85 


17 


6 












7 










4 


168 


115 


44 


1 


37 


11 


160 


115 


44 


1 


37 


53 


81 


8 


8 










3 


4 


3 



Teachers, 1909-'10. 



229 



Table XV. Scholarship of White Teachers — Continued. 





O 








S 


C.S 




Holding 
Diploma. 




B . 
3 en 


■a 




0) 

■c 

03 


Teac 
ed in 
ocal-t 

3. 


>.S 


Havi 

ars' 
ice. 




O 0) 




a 

s 


5 


umber 
mploy 
ural L 
istrict. 


II 

3 O 


umber 
our Ye 
xperie 


3o 




HH 


Ph 


m 


H 


zwmo 


'Z'Z 


?;feW 


'ZO 


Wilson. . -- 


100 
74 
22 


52 
52 


22 
22 


1 
6 

6 

i 

1 


. 29 
10 
15 


49 
32 
14 


22 


Rural-- - 


4 


Wilson City _ 


17 


Lucama - . 


4 

74 
59 






■ 1 


4 
22 

20 


3 

36 
30 


1 


Yadkin _. _ ...- 


39 
36 


31 
23 


4 


12 
2 


7 


Yancey _ - 


5 






North Carolina .._ 


8,422 


5,530 


1,500 


71 


1,739 


2,715 


4,061 


1,719 


Rural - - 


7,113 


5,530 


1,500 


71 


1,739 


1,986 


3,129 


982 


City 


1,309 










729 


932 


737 















230 



Teachers, 1901)-' 10. 



TABLE XVI. SCHOLARSHIP OF COLORED TEACHERS, 1909-'10. 

This table shows the grade of schohirshii) of rural colored teachers employed 
during the year, as reported by the county superintendents, also something of 
the training and experience of all colored teachers, rural and city, and the 
number of teachers employed in local-tax districts, not including those in city 
schools. 

Summary of Table X^'I and C'ompakison wrrn in08-'09. 



Total number colored teachers employed, 1909-10 

Total number colored teachers employed, 1908-'09 

Increase 

First grade, rural, 1909-10 

First grade, rural, 1908-09 

Increase 

Second grade, rural, 1909-10 

Second grade, rural, 1908-09 

Increase 

Third grade, rural, 1909-10 

Third grade, rural, 1908-09 

Increase 

Number having normal training, 1909-' 10 

Number having normal training, 1908-'09 

Increase 

Number having four years' experience, 1909-10 

Number having four years' experience, 1908-09 

Increase 

Number having college diploma , 1909-' 10 

Number having college diploma, 1908-09 

Increase 

Number teachers employed in rural local-tax districts. 



Rural. 



2,400 

2,444 

*44 

748 

757 

*9 

1,608' 

1,635 

*27 

42 

. 52 

*10 

956 

1,104 

*148 

1,435 

1,394 

41 

270 

274 

*4 

272 



City. 



.394 

384 

10 



254 
231 

23 
309 
293 

16 
149 
155 

*6 



North 
Carolina. 



2,794 

2,82S 

*34 

748 

757 

*9 

1,608 

1,635 

*27 

42 

52 

*10 

1,210 

1,33.5 

*12;> 

1,74-1 

1.687 

57 

419 

429 

*10 

272 



* Decrease. 



Teachers, lOOO-'lO. 



231 



Table 'XVI. Scholarship of Colored Teachers — Continued. 



! 

- 


Total Number of 
Teachers. 


First Grade. 


Second Grade. 


Third Grade. 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 


Number Having 
Normal Training. 

Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. 


fi OJ 


\lamance _„____ 


33 i 

27 

2 

2 

i 


14 
14 


1 
13 i 

13 i 


::::: 


2 

2 


1 
25 2.5 


8 


Rural ._ - 


23 


19 


6 


Burlington 


1 
2 2 1 


1 


Graham - - 






- 






2 




Haw River- ^ 














Mebane __ i 


2 
6 
3 












2 

4 '. 
3 


1 


Alexander - _ _ - 


2 


4 
3 






2 
1 


2 


Alleghany . .--_ 








Anson __ _- _ - 


43 
40 
•3 
10 
45 


8 

8 


32 
32 






6 


20 


3 


Rural 






6 ' 18 


2 


Wadesboro : 








■ 

2 

32 


1 


Ashe___ 


1 
21 


13 






2 
35 


1 


Beaufort 


2 


6 


7 


Rural 


36 


21 


13 


2 


6 


31 


26 


4 


WashinKton . _ 


7 

2 

60 










3 

1 

37 


6 


3 


Belhaven 




. 


• ^ 






Bertie - - - 


31 


25 




4 


42 


2 


Rural 


56 


31 


25 




4 


35 


40 




Aulander.-- * . __ 


















Windsor 


4 

47 










2_ 
16 


2 
47 


9 


Bladen 


2 


45 




3 




Brunswick _ _ _ 


23 
33 


11 
9 


12 

8 






4 

27 


21 

29 


4 


Buncombe 




4 


12 


Rural 


• 

17 


9 


8 




4 


15 


14 


4 


Asheville 


16 












12 


15 


8 


Burke _ 


12 

9 

1 

1 3 
28 




9 
9 






1 


7 

4 

3 

18 




Rural 








Morganton_- __ _ 




1 


1 

23 




Cabarrus 


2 


20 




2 


8 


Rural 


. 22 


2 


20 




2 


19 


13 


3 


Concord 


6 

! 16 
13 










4 

1 

5 
3 


5 

11 

9 


5 


Caldwell 


3 
3 


10 
10 






4 


Rural 






2 


Lenoir, _ _ . 


3 






1 




2 


2 


2 


Granite. . . 








I 




Rhodhiss : 



















232 



Teachers, 1909-'10. 



Table XVI. Scholarship of Colobed Teachers — Continued. 





Total Number of 
Teachers. 


First Grade. 


6 

13 

o 

■3 

a 
o 


Third Grade. 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 


Number Having 
Normal Training. 


Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. 


Number Holding 
College Diploma. 


Camden 


12 
5 

39 
' 21 

16 
2 
3 

39 
4 
3 


9 

. 1 

23 

4 

4 


3 

4 
16 
12 
12 






11 
5 
5 
4 
2 
1 
1 

22 


9 

4 

17 

13 

10 

2 

1 

29 


1 


Carteret 


"' 1 




Caswell _ - _ _ 


5 


6 


Catawba. .. - - 


1 6 


Rural 




3 


Newton _ _ . 






1 


Hickory - . . - _ 










2 


Chatham. .. _. .. 


9 


30 
3 
3 






! 9 


Cherokee . . . . . 








Rural- .. - -- 












Murphy ... 












Andrews . _ _ _ .. 


1 

23 
22 

1 

1 
26 
22 

3 

1 
40 
45 
36 

9 

65 
59 

6 
















Chowan.. . _ _. 


13 
13 


9 
9 




1 
1 


18 
18 


18 
17 

1 




Rural 




Edenton. _ .. 




Clav 


1 
7 
7 












Cleveland .... .... 


13 
13 


2 
2 


' , 


13 
13 

• 


14 
14 


3 


Rural - 


3 


Shelby . . . ... 




Kings Mountain . 
















Columbus ... .... _. 


14 

4 
4 


26 
32 
32 




4 
4 
4 


9 

10 

5 

5 

63 

59 

• 4 


26 
33 
25 

8 
42 
36 

6 


4 


Craven . ..... . 


1 


Rural 




New Bern.- . . . 


1 


Cumberland ...... 


3 
3 


56 
56 






6 


Rural. ... 






4 


Fayetteville .. 






2 


Hope Mills .. . . 












Currituck ._ ._ _ . 


16 

2 
23 
18 

3 

2 

11 1 
46 


5 
1 
7 

7 


10 
1 

11 
11 


1 


9 


14 
2 
5 
1 
2 
2 
3 
1 


9 

1 
12 

9 

1 

2 

6 
30 1 


1 


Dare .. . 


1 


Davidson . _ . 






3 


Rural -- . -- 






1 


Lexington.. .. 






2 


Thomasville. _. .. 












Davie 


! 

19 


9 

27 


2 


6 


2 


Duplin 





Teachers, 1009-'10. 



233 



Table XVI. Scholarship of Colored Teachers — Continued. 








■s 

u 

g 
3 03 

3l 

O <D 


First Grade. 


Second Grade. 


■3 

o 

■3 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 


Number Having 
Normal Training. 


Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. 


Sii 

|2;o 


Durham 


45 




18 




7 


22 


29 


28 


Rural 


18 




18 




7 




11 


6 


Durham 

Edgecombe 

Rural 

Tarboro 


27 










22 


18 


22 


42 


7 


28 






16 


35 


7 


35 


7 


28 






12 


30 


3 


7 
39 






. - .- 




4 
27 


5 
30 


4 


Forsyth 

"Rural 


9 


15 






7 


24 


9 


15 






17 


16 


6 


"Wincfon 


15 










10 


14 


1 


Franklin 


51 

42 
3 
4 


11 
11 


31 
31 




6 
6 


23 
20 

2 


33 

28 
1 
3 


1 


Rural - - - _ 




Franklinton 


1 


TjOiiisburff 












YounKsville 


2 












1 




Gaston 


36 


3 


29 




8 


9 


21 


9 


Rural 


32 


3 


29 




8 


6 


17 


7 


Gastonia 


4 










3 


4 


,2 


Chprrvville 








1 








Gates 


24 


13 


11 




5 


20 


13 


2 


Graham . 


1 


1 










' 




Granville 


48 


22 


21 




16 


-- 


30 


8 


Rural 


43 


22 


21 




16 




27 


8 


Oxford 


5 
25 
55 












3 

12 
34 




Greene ._ _ _ 


4 
14 


21 
21 


1. 


19 


4 
45 


4 


Guilford 


15 


Rural - - 


35 
10 
10 


14 


21 




19 




25 
10 
10 


19 
6 
9 


5 


Greensboro . 


7 


High Point. 










3 


Guilford College 












Halifax . 


65 

56 

2 

3 

1 


26 
26 


30 
30 






43 
42 


49 

40 

2 

3 

1 


5 


Rural - - -. 






4 


Scotland Neck 








Weldon 














Roanoke Rapids . 












1 


Enfield 


3 


i 








1 


3 





234 



Teachers, 1909-'10. 



Table XVI. Scholarship of Colored Teachers— CoiUinued. 








Total Number of 
Teachers. 


First Grade. 


Second (Irade. 


Third Grade. 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 


Number Having 
Normal Training. 


Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. 


55 ci 

S ^ 


Harnett 


32 


5 


27 






■ 8 


17 I 


I 


Rural 


32 


5 


27 







8 


17 


1 


Dunn 


















Haywood 

Rural 


3 


' 








1 


3 












1 






Waynesville 

Henderson 


3 












3 




13 


5 


5 




2 


1 


9 




Rural 


10 


5 


5 




2 




7 




Hendersonville . 


3 










1 


2 




Hertford 


41 
19 


14 

8 


27 
11 






22 
9 


26 
9 


9 


Hyde 




1 




Iredell 


37 


11 


18 


3 


4 


24 


28 


10 


Rural 


32 


11 


18 


3 


4 


21 


23 


5 


Mooresville „ ^ _ - 


2 










■1 


2 





State.sville 


3 

4 










1 
2 


3 

1 


3 


Jackson 


3 


1 




4 


1 


.Johnston . - -_ -- 


42 


18 


19 




2 


7 


20 


1 


Rural 


37 


18 


19 




2 


5 


16 


1 


Selma - - _ _ 


2 

3 

23 










2 

1 


2 

2 

14 




Smithfield _ . 










Jones _ __ 




23 




6 




Lee 


21 


9 


12 




2 


15 


19 


10 


Rural 


21 


9 


12 




2 


15 


19 


10 


Sanford- - 


















Lenoir_ : _ _ _ ^ _ ^ _ 


31 

24 

5 

2 


* 

1 
1 


23 
23 






3 


17 

10 

5 

2 





RuraL 








Kinston .- __ . 






1 
2 


1 


LaGrange 






, 


1 


Lincoln 


14 
12 

2 
. 4 

4 


7 
7 


5 
5 






5 
3 
2 


12 

10 

2 


4 


Rural 






- 2 


Lincolnton ^ ^ - _ 






2 


Macon 




4 

4 








Madi.son . _ 






2 





Teachers, 1009-'10. 



235 



Table XVI. Scholarship of Colored Teachers — Continued. 





Total Number of 
Teachers. 


First Grade. 


Second Grade. 


Third Grade. 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 


Number Having . 
Normal Training. 


Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. ' 


^6 


Martin 


34 12 


18 






14 1 26 

11 1 23 

3 3 




Rural 


30 12 ' 18 








Williamston 


3 

1 
10 


1 
1 








Robersonville 
















McDowell - . >- 


3 


7 






1 

3 
3 


4 
4 


1 


Rural . - _ - - 


10 3 1 7 






1 


Marion . . . 









Mecklenburg 


78 ^ 50 






42 

17 

25 

2 

4 


54 

33 

21 

1 

4 


23 


Rural-- -_ - - 


53 

25 

4 


■3 50 






19 


Charlotte- . ---- 










4 


Mitchell-. . - - -_- - 




4 








Montgomery-- 


I 
22 fi 1 12 






4 


Rural--- --. - --- - - - 


18 


6 12 








Troy - 


4 
31 








4 
10 
10 


4 
19 

19 


4 


Moore 


.S 


27 


1 
1 




4 


Rural 

Carthage-. 


1 
31 3 27 


4 


Southern Pines - - -- 


1 
1 1 












Nash 

Rural 

Rocky Mount _. - 


48 

-41 

7 

35 


9 

- 

9 


30 
30 


2 
2 


2 
2 


8 

5 

3 

31 

13 

18 

24 

14 

14 

1 

22 

15 

7 

3 


32 
• 27 

5 
30 
11 
19 
29 
13 
15 
14 
15 
8 
7 
20 


5 

3 
9 


New Hanover - 


1.^ 








17 


Rural -- - 


13 13 


• 






3 


Wilmington - - - - _ 


22 
51 
19 










14 


Northami)ton. 


4 45 

5 11 


2 

2 
1 


7 
6 

10 


4 


Onslow _ - . _ 


6 


Orange 

Pamlico.. - _ . . 


23 i 12 9 

19 ! 7 1 11 


7 
9 


Pasquotank . 


22 


4 


11 




Rural-- .... --. --•- 


15 1 4 11 








Elizabeth City 


7 
39 


1 

1 1 








Pender 


16 


1 

23 




10 





O ^> K 



Teachers, 1909-'10. 



Table XVI. Scholarship of Colored Teachers — Continued. 





CM 

o 

a . 
lis 

—.a 
o aa 


•a 

o 

s 


■a 

o 

■a 
a 
o 


Third Grade. 


Number Teachers 
Employed in 
Rural Local-tax 
Districts. 


Number Having 
Normal Training. 


Number Having 
Four Years' 
Experience. 


Number Holding 
College Diploma. 


Perquimans _- 


25 
22 

3 
35 
32 

3 
56 
51 

5 

4 
20 
18 

2 


14 
14 


7 
7 


1 
1 




19 
16 

3 

9 

' 
3 

14 

9 

5 

5 

7 

5 
• 2. 


15 

13 

2 

16 

13 

3 

25 

21 

4 

7 

1 

1 


1 


Rural-- _- -_ - 


1 


Hertford. ._- .. _ .. 




Person 





32 
32 






3 


Rural -- - 








Roxboro ..- - .- 






3 


Pitt. . - .-- .... 


16 
16 

• 


31 
31 




6 
6 


3 


Rural -. . 




Greenville. . - - - 


3 


Polk.. ... ... . 


3 
3 
3 


1 
15 
15 








Randolph .. .. _. .. 


3 


Rural 






2 


Ashboro .,.. 






1 


Randleman . .. 




1 






Richmond . . . .. 


28 
24 

2 

2 
65 
63 

2 
43 
35 

8 
47 
41 

6 
19 
52 
48 

4 
29 
23 

6 


15 
15 


7 
7 




2 
2 


3 
3 


11 
7 
2 
2 
55 
54 
1 

17 
12 
5 
29 
25 
4 

11 
5 

3 

2 

20 

15 

5 


19 

15 

2 

2 

42 

40 

2 

24 

18 

6 

32 

27 

5 

8 

33 

29 

4 

6 

4 

2 


3 


Rural 


1 


Rockingham. 


2 


Hamlet ,._. 











Robeson 


34 
34 


28 
28 






11 


Rural 






11 


Maxton . ... 








Rockingham . _. 


15 
15 


20 
20 




3 
3 


8 


Rural - 


4 


Reidsville. .. _ - 


4 


Rowan 

Rural 


14 
14 


25 
25 


2 
2 


6 
6 


18 
13 


Salisbury . _. 


5 


Rutherford. ... _ _ . 


1 
8 
8 


18 
40 
40 






1 


Sampson . 





11 
11 


2 


Rural -. . 


1 


Clinton - .- 


1 


Scotland- . ... .. 


8 
8 


15 
15 





.2 
2 


6 




4 


Laurinburg 


2 



Teachers, 1909-'10. 



237 



Table XVI. Scholarship of Colored Teachers — Continued. 




238 



Teachers, 1909-'10. 



Table XVI. Scholarship of Colobed Teachers — Continued. 





O 








2 

a: ^ 


c.S 


M 


.- TO 












Si cs 


C 


•=E 




1. 

3 M 


6 


0) 

■a 
a 

O 


■a 


Teac 
ed in 
ocal-t 

5. 


Havi 
Train 


Havi 

ars' 

[ice. 


2c 
0-5. 








O 


'o 


O 


1^:^.^ 


umber 
ormal 


I^-S 






O 1/ 




O 


." 




3 o;^ 


3 




HH 


E 


m 


H 


ZWPhQ 


^;2; 


ZP^w ! 


^O 


Wilson - 


39 


10 


16 


1 




16 


26 


9 


Rural 


27 


10 


16 


1 




8 


17 


5 


AVilson Citv . 


10 
2 

!t 










G 

o 


8 
1 

7 


4 


Lucama 








_ - -- 




Yadkin 


2 


7 






2 


Yancey _ 


3 




3 








1 








1 




North Carolina 


2,794 


748 


1,608 


42 


272 


1,210 


1,744 


419 


Rural 


2,400 


748 


1,608 


42 


272 


956 


1,435 


270 


City.- 


394 






^ 




254 


309 j 


149 















G. FURNITURE OF RURAL SCHOOLHOUSES AND NEW 

HOUSES BUILT. 



TABLE XVII. FURNITURE OF RURAL SCHOOLHOUSES, 1909-'10. 

The t'ollowiug table gives the lumiher of rural schoolhouses t'uruisheil with 
patent desks, the number furnished with home-made desks, and the number 
lurnished with benches, by races. 

SUMMAKY OF TABLE XVII. 





White. 


Colored. 


North 
Carolina. 


Number of rural schoolhouses 


5,223 

2,022 

2,428 

528 

38.7 

46.4 

10.1 


2,197 

148 

1,270 

672 

6.7 

57.8 

30.5 


7,420 


Furnished with patent desks.. . . 


2,170 


Furnislied with home-made desks. . .. . 


3,698 


Furnished with benches . . . 


1.200 


Percentage furnished witli patent desks _. . . _ 


29.2 


I'ercentage furnished with home-made desks . . 


49.8 


Percentage furnished with benches . 


16.1 









White. 




Colored. 






Number 
. Houses. 


Furnished 
With Patent 
Desks. 


Furnished 
With Home- 
made Desks. 


Furnished 

With 

Benches. 


Number 
Houses. 


Furnished 
With Patent 
Desks. 


Furnished 
With Home- 
made Desks. 


Furnished 

With 

Benches. 


Alamance 


51 
.50 


40 
13 


11 
18 




26 

5 


7 

1 


'l7 
3 


2 


Alexander 


10 


1 


Alleghany 


41 


15 


25 


1 


3 




1 


3 


.\nson 


43 


22 


20 


1 


40 


1 


1 


38 


Ashe 


98 


4 


45 


49 


10 




1 


9 


Beaufort 


75 


15 


60 




34 


3 


17 


14 


H<'rtie 


63 


18 


41 


4 


53 


9 


38 


13 


Bladen 


66 


17 


48 


1 


47 


1 


37 


9 


Brimswick 


48 


3 


40 


5 


25 




17 


8 


Buncombe 


90 


45 


39 


6 


13 


1 


3 


9 


15urke 


52 
44 
70 
18 
39 
40 


4 
21 

4 
21 
30 


• 42 
40 
49 
14 
14 
5 


10 


8 
19 
12 
12 

6 
38 




5 
10 
12 
12 


3 


Cabarrus. 




9 


Caldwell ^. _ 

Camden 












Carteret 


4 
5 




6 


Caswell 




8 


30 



240 



FUKNITUEE OF HoUSES, 1009-'10. 



Table XVII. Fctbnitube of Rukal Schoolhouses — Continued. 



White. 



Colored. 





Number 
Houses. 


Furnished 
With Patent 
Desks. 


Furnished 
With Home- 
made Desks. 


Furni.shed 

With 

Benches. 


Number 
Houses. 


Furnished 
With Patent 
Desks. 


Furnished 
With Home- 
made Desks. 


Furnished 

With 

Benches. 


Catawba 


76 
75 
53 
19 
17 
73 
87 
45 
73 
34 
18 
86 
36 
74 
28 
39 
80 
41 
60 
31 
24 
,52 
30 
84 
44 
59 
51 
47 
32 
24 
89 
45 
106 
26 
33 


6 
13 

3 
17 

1 

28 
42 
33 
69 
12 


70 
60 
•10 

2 
16 
45 
25 
11 

4 
17 




16 

38 

2 

15 




16 

27 




Chatham 


2 

10 




11 


Cherokee 


2 

1 




Chowan 


9 


5 


Clay 






Cleveland 




19 
38 
32 
54 
14 

1 
15 

9 
40 
16 
35 
21 
36 
28 
23 

1 
42 
21 
29 
46 
26 

1 

8 
33 
19 
31 

3 
36 

n 

12 




7 
15 
15 
29 

9 

6 

4 

22 


12 


Columbus 


20 

1 




23 


Craven 

Cumberland 


2 

1 



15 


Currituck 

Dare.- _ 


5 


4 
1 


Davidson 


9 

9 
2 

22 
75 
20 
37 
13 

1 
38 
22 
64 
32 
17 
20 
12 
11 

2 
42 
14 
45 
11 

4 


74 

27 
65 


3 


9 


Davie- 




5 


Duplin. . 




1 
1 


17 


Durham 






Edgecombe 


17 
5 
20 
20 
18 




35 
14 
30 

8 
19 




Forsyth 




7 




Franklin 




1 
3 


6 


Gaston 

Gates 


, 1 
3 


19 

1 


Graham. 


23 


1 


Granville 


14 

8 
20 
10 
42 
20 
24 
21 
19 
43 
10 
61 
13 
27 


1 


41 
21 

16 
10 
26 




Greene.- . 




Guilford 




10 
27 


3 


Halifax 

Harnett 


2 


9 


Haywood. - 


11 
11 






Henderson 






8 


Hertford . . 


2 


31 
9 
9 




Hyde... 


3- 

4 

21 


10 


Iredell 

Jackson.- 


1 


21 


Johnston 


2 

1 


27 

16 

8 


7 


Jones 

J.«e 


2 
2 


4 
4 



Furniture of Houses, 1909-'10. 



241 



Table XVll. Furniture of Rural Schoolhouses — Continued. 



White- 



Colored. 



Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin , 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 

Northampton... 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank .. 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 



3 O 









38 
57 



"d c to 
0) o ^ 



34 
17 



4 
40 



T3 



S 3 
3 O 






u c/; 






T3 


(a o <v 


nishe 

h 

ches. 


f.ww 




t~* *^ ci 


3:C '^ 


3S * 



56 


5 


28 


23 


72 


10 


20 


42 


43 


4 


39 




55 


12 


29 


14 


88 


43 


25 1 




70 


3 


1 

.30 


17 


=i8 


3 

8 
47 






01 






51 


4 




14 


9 


5 




41 


18 


22 


1 


53 


11 


42 




39 


16 


23 




22 


16 


5 


1 


''I 


4 

7 


17 
33 




43 


3 


?1* 








4fi 


46 






80 


10 
2 


70 
13 




29 


14 


Q7 


28 
26 


69 
2 




29 


1 


80 


44 


29 


7 


70 


68 
45 
49 


2 

38 
28 




83 




78 


1 


89 


44 


43 


2 


■'3 


19 
6 


4 




(iO 




67 


30 


1 

21 


16 


86 


38 


26 


22 



23 
12 

4 

3 
26 

9 
55 

2 

17 
23 
37 
11 
44 
20 
25 
13 
16 
35 
18 
30 
51 

8 
18 
23 
*80 
30 
33 
23 i 
49 
22 

7 
10 
13 



23 
6 
1 



I 


26 

6 

30 






3 

25 




2 








4 

1 
1 


1 
33 
10 
19 
20 
8 
7 
15 
17 








24 




17 


j 


6 


1 

1 




18 








' 30 
51 

4 
18 

2 
45 

8 
17 
10 
22 

4 










4 








21 


5 
20 

2 

! 

1 


30 

2 

14 

13 


2 

16 


25 
2 




1 

2 


9 




11 



*Includes Croatans. 
Part 11—10 



242 



Furniture of Houses, 1909-'10. 



Table XVII. Furniture of Rural Schoolhouses — Continued. 







White. 




Colored. 




Number 
Houses. 


Furnished 
With Patent 
Desks. 


Furnished 
With Home- 
made Desks. 


Furnished 

With 

Benches. 


Number 
Houses. 


Furnished 
With Patent 
Desks. 


Furnished 
With Home- 
made Desks. 


Furnished 

With 

Benches. 


Swain 


46 
28 
24 
74 
23 
87 
33 
25 
68 
65 
125 
51 
53 
36 


3 

10 
2 

15 
22 

83 
30 

1 

1 
55 

5 
40 

6 


35 

4 

22 

48 

1 

4 


8 

14 


1 
2 
9 

37 
22 
62 
39 
. 17 






1 


Transylvania- 






2 


Tyrrell-- 


2 
14 


■ 

9 

14 

22 

38 

9 

14 




Union _- 


11 


21 


Vance.- - - _ 




Wake 




10 


Warren . - _ . 




30 


Washington 

Watauga 


22 

8 

10 

100 

11 

46 
7 


2 

59 


3 


Wayne 


38 

16 

24 

6 

2 




38 
7 

21 
1 




Wilkes 

Wilsor 

Yadkin 


20 

1 
29 


1 


9 
2 
5 


Yancey .- .. 





2 










Total 


5,223 


2,022 


2,428 


528 


2,197 


148 


1,270 


672 



New Houses, 1909-'10. 



243 



TABLE XVIII. NEW RURAL SCHOOLHOUSES BUILT AND THEIR COST, 
AND THE AMOUNT EXPENDED FOR REPAIRS, 1909-'10. 

This table shows the number of new rural schoolhouses built during the 
yt'jir. by races, and their cost, and also the cost of repairs on old houses. 

Summary of Table XVIII and Comparison with l!l08-'09. 



Total new schoolhouses built, 1909-10 

Total new schoolhouses built, 190S-'09 

Total for two years 

Total cost of new schoolhouses built, 1909-'10 

Total cost of new schoolhouses built, 1908-09 

Decrease 

Average cost of new rural schoolhouses built, 1909-10- 
Average cost of new rural schoolhouses built, 1908-09- 

Decrease - 

Total cost of repairs 



White. 



280 
284 
564 



Colored. 



89 

72 

161 



North 
Carolina. 



369 

356 

725 

239,160.58 

272,376.00 

66,784.38 

648.00 

765.00 

117.00 

44.338.72 



.\lamance- 
Alexander- 
AUeghany - 

Anson 

Ashe 

Beaufort . . 

Bertie 

Bladen 

Brunswick- 
Buncombe- 

Burke 

Cabarrus -- 
Caldwell. - . 

Camden 

Carteret — 

Caswell 

Catawba - - 
Chatham . . 
Cherokee - . 



Number 

New 
Houses, 
White. 



Number 

New 
Houses, 
Colored. 



Total I 
Number i Total Cost 



New 

Houses 

Built. 



New 
Houses. 



Total Cost 

of Repairs, 

Old 

Houses. 




1 

4 

3 

10 



% 1,989.63 
1,200.00 



13,200.00 

550.00 

1,700.00 

2,000.00 

2,100.00 



646.35 
545.12 
395.81 
200.00 
167.00 
568.00 



2,802.12 
1,000.00 
1,503.47 
1,200.00 
606.00 
1,100.00 
1,100.00 
1,700.00 
1,750.00 



239.14 
225 00 
1.123.49 
75.00 
233.64 
164.60 
413.00 
421.00 
200.00 
175.00 
459 32 



244 



Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Columbus - _ 

Craven 

Cumberland . 
Currituck.-. 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe - 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville — 

Greene 

Guilford 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood. -- 
Henderson. _ 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 

Johnston 

Jones 

Lee 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 



l^EW Houses, 1909-'10. 

Table XVIII. New Rural Schoolhouses Built^ — Continued. 



Number 

New 
Houses, 
White. 



Number 

New 
Houses, 
Colored. 



2 
1 
1 
4 
4 
2 

22 
5 

6 
3 
4 
4 



2 ! 

1 ! 
1 I 

--I 

1 I 

1 i 
1 i 



1 

19 

2 
1 



Total ! 

Number 

New 
Houses 

Built. 


Total Cost 
New- 
Houses. 


Total Cost 

of Repairs, 

Old 

Houses. 




3, 


% 3,050.00 


$ 




1 


300.00 


25.00 




3 


950.00 


250.00 




6 
10 


2,750.00 
9,826.32 






124.30 




9 
2 








1,579.83 


357.56 




1 


400.00 


167.79 




6 


1,545.39 


213.11 




3 


1,350.00 






2 


560.00 


419.73 




3 


21,000.00 


500.00 




3 


2,725.44 


524.75 




3 


1,479.88 


2,990.11 




2 


650.00 


525.00 




4 


11,200.00 


150.00 




3 


2,474.94 






1 




35.00 




9 


9,693.00 






4 


1,581.60 


85.73 




7 


10,920.00 


3,200.00 




1 


1,135.00 


1,017.82 




6 


2,050.00 



429.94 
223.35 




2 


1,425.00 


174.61 




1 


600,00 


439.46 




1 


750.00 


119.11 




5 


3,400.00 


2,400.00 




4 


7,634.00 


240.83 




3 


1,031.00 


478.00 




41 


2,225.00 


50.00 




5 

2 


981.00 
503.00 






29.15 




7 


1,354.00 






3 


4,200.00 




— 

429.00 




4 


2,700.00 


157.68 




5 


2,575.00 


101.00 



I^EW Houses, 1909-'10. 



245 



Table XVIII. New Rural Schoolhouses Built — Continued. 



McDowell- 

Mecklenburg- - 

Mitchell 

Montgomery- - 

Moore . 

Nash 

New Hanover- 
Northampton - 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank--- 

Pender , 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. - 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Stokes 

Surry 

Swain 

Transylvania - . 



Tyrrell. 
Union-. 
Vance.. 
Wake . 



Number 

New 
Houses, 
White. 



Number 

New 
Houses, 
Colored. 



Total 

Number 
New 



Total Cost 

New 



Houses 1 Houses. 

Built. I 



3 $ 2,200.00 



3,800.00 
1,200.00 

495.00 
7,100.00 
5,116.18 
2,362.00 
5,300.00 
1,931.70 

989.12 

816.85 

465.00 
3,000,00 
1,051.00 

280.00 
2,250.00 

440.00 
5,375.00 
2.000.00 
4,711.00 
5,750.00 
2,887.52 
3,022.00 
2,998.75 

800.00 
2,115.16 
1,234.81 
2,055.00 

400.00 j 
2,038.63 r 



Total Cost 

of Repairs, 

Old 

Houses. 



248.00 
450.00 



105.04 
155.00 
432.88 
1,050.00 
211.74 
274.90 
214.32 



195.00 
278.00 
114.00 
120.00 
48.00 
20.00 
177.98 
600 00 
133.00 
488.62 
453.00 



182.10 
282.01 
278.03 
480.00 
363.23 
555.29 



1,255.00 
350.00 



Warren 

Washington. 



3,094.05 



447.00 



11,695.00 



153.00 



246 



]^EW Houses, 1909-'10. 



Table XVIII. New Rural Schoolhouses Built — Continued. 



Number | Number 

New New 

Houses, ' Houses, 

White. Colored. 



Total 
Number 

New 

Houses 

Built. 



Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Total. 



4|- 



Totfll Costi Total Cost 
Total Costl^f ^ .^ 

Houses. Hocuses. 



5p w- 

1,595.08 
3,910.00 

449.00 

722.11 
1,500.00 



1,220.63 

131.00 

524.00 

87.05 

60.80 



280 



369 I 239,160.58 44,338.72 



DiSTKIBDTION OF $125,000, 1909-'10. 



24^ 



TABLE XIX. RECORD OF DISTRIBUTION OF $125,000 FOR 1909-'10. 



Alamance - 
Alexander. 
Alleghany- 
Anson 



Ashe 

Beaufort . 
Bertie 



Bladen . 



Brunswick. 
Buncombe - 
Burke 



Cabarrus- 
Caldwell. 
Camden.. 
Carteret . 



Caswell. 



Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee. _ _ 

Chowan 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland. 

Currituck 

Dare 

Davidson 

Davie 

Duplin 

Durham 

Edgecombe.. 

Forsyth 

Franklin 

Gaston 

Gates 

Graham 

Granville 

Greene 



Counties. 



Population. 


Amount. 


9,471 


$ 1,623.33 


4,054 


694.86 


3,121 


534.94 


8,616 


1,476.78 


7,467 


1,279.84 


9,525 


1,632.59 t 


7,706 


1,320.81 


5,785 


991 . 55 


4,717 


808.50 


17,131 


2,936.25 


6,888 


1,180.60 


8,586 


1,471.64 


6,924 


1,186.77 


2,128 


371.56 


4,175 


715.60 


4,968 


851.52 


9,823 


1,683.66 


8,059 


1.381.31 


5,188 


889.23 


3.379 


579.16 


1.498 


263.58 


10,101 


1,731.31 


9,015 


1,545.17 


7,558 


1,295.44 


12,366 


2,119.53 


2,791 


478.38 


1,652 


290.01 


9,273 


1,589.39 


4,636 


794.61 


8,050 


1,379.77 


10,963 


1,879.06 


10,131 


1,736.45 


14,293 


2,449.82 


8,667 


1,485.52 


12,424 


2,129.47 


, 3,959 


678.57 


1,683 


295.29 


8,375 


1,435.48 


4,153 ! 


711.82 



248 



Distribution of $125,000, 1909-'10. 



Table XIX. Record of Distribution — Continued. 



Guilford, 
Halifax . 



Harnett 

Hay wood - 
Henderson . 
Hertford- _ 



Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson- - 
Johnston- 
Jones 



Lee- 



Lenoir. 



Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

Martin 

McDowell 

Mecklenburg^ . 

Mitchell 

Montgomery-. 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover. 
Northampton. 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank. _ 

Pender 

Perquimans. .. 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham. - 

Rbwan 

Rutherford 



Counties. 



1 Population. 


Amount. 


18,399 


$ 3,153.59 


11,695 


2,004.52 


7,145 


1,224.65 


6,739 


1,155.06 


5,150 


882.71 


5,400 


925.56 


3,088 


529.28 


11,249 


1,928.08 


4,691 


804.04 


13,505 


2,314.75 


2,793 


478.72 


3,857 


661.09 


6,635 


1,137.23 


6,057 


1,038.17 


4,347 


745.08 


7,906 


1,355.09 


5,801 


994.29 


5,713 


979.21 


21,307 


3,652.02 


6,493 


1,112.90 


5,255 


900.71 


5,827 


998.75 


9,950 


1,705.43 


7,689 


1,317.89 


7,077 


1,213.00 


4,706 


806.60 


4,933 


845.52 


3,486 


597.50 


5,286 


906.02 


4,802 


823.06 


3,621 


620.64 


5,812 


996.18 


12,597 


2,159.13 


2,518 


431.59 


10,150 


1,739.71 


6,741 


1,155.41 


16,049 


2,750 80 


13,501 


2,314.07 


12,321 


2,111.82 


9,579 


1,641.84 



Distribution ok $125,000, 1909-'10. 



■2V.) 



Table XIX. Record of Distribution — Continued. 



Sampson- 
Scotland. 

Stanly 



Stokes. 
Surry. _ 
Swain . 



Transylvania. 

Tyrrell 

Union . . 

Vance 

Wake 

Warren 

Washington. - 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

Yancey 

Total- - 



Counties. 



Population. 


Amount. 


9,900 


$ 1,696.86 


3,359 


575.73 


6,943 


1,190.03 


6,926 


1,187.12 


10,326 


1,769.88 


3,164 


.542.31 


2,370 


406.22 


1,828 


320.14 


10,813 


1,853.35 


6,569 


1,125.92 


20,590 


3,529.13 


7,022 


1,203.57 


3,627 


621.67 


5,206 


892.31 


11,403 


1,954.47 


10,764 


1,844.95 


9,229 


1,581.85 


5,426 


930.02 


4,455 


763.59 


729,089 


125,000.00 



250 



Equalization of Terms. 



TABLE XX. 

The followiiiij 
priation of $100 
Revisal 1905. 



ANNUAL APPROPRIATION TO EQUALIZE SCHOOL 
TERMS, 1909-'10. 

is the record of the apportioument of the anunal State appro- 
,000 to equalize school terms in accordance with section 4090, 



Counties. 



Alexander. - 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe 

Bladen 

Brunswick 

Burke 

Caldwell 

Camden 

Cartsret 

Caswell 

Catawba 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Clay 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Cumberland 
Currituck- _ 

Dare 

Davidson 

Duplin 

Franklin 

Gates 

Graham, 

Granville 

Greene 

Harnett 

Henderson. -_ 

Hertford 

Hyde 

Iredell 

Jackson 



Number Districts 
Asking Aid. 



White. Colored. 



Amount 
I^egally 
Asked. 



Amount 
Appor- 
tioned. 



52 
41 
43 
99 



6 

3 

41 

10 



68 


48 


42 


. 27 j 


55 


10 


65 


13 : 


19 


11 1 


40 


7 i 

I 


41 


38 


73 


17 


80 


38 


51 


3 


13 




71 


23 


81 


32 


93 


54 


33 


10 


19 


l' 


19 


6 


10 


3 


47 


40 


31 


21 


21 


1 


51 


41 


31 


4 


59 


27 


53 


5 


31 


33 ; 


27 


19 


22 


32 


38 


3 



2,158.00 


$ 1.726.40 


4,111.76 


2,741.18 


1,534.21 


1,380.79 


4,166.46 


2,777.64 


5,062.45 


3,374.97 


1,500.00 


1,350.00 


944.36 


897.14 


3,731.23 


2,487.49 


1,551.64 


1,241.32 


2,747.00 


2,197.60 


2,402.36 


1,921.89 


2,205.00 


1,984.95 


1,801.22 


1,501.02 


3,928.21 


2,618.80 


386.60 


347.94 


24.32 


2,026.67 


1,. 376. 00 


1,238.40 


1,723.00 


1,550.70 


769.03 


730.58 


3,490.68 


2,792.55 


438.50 


416.57 


927.00 


880.65 


2,290.50 


2,061.25 


1,149.35 


1,091.88 


400.00 


360.00 


1,900.00 


1,583.34 


996.05 


896.45 


1,012.42 


911.18 


1,411.51 


1,129.21 


847.00 


804.65 


3,962.72 


2,641.82 


988.50 


938.60 


3.014 09 


2,411 28 



Equalization of Terms. 



•2:>i 



Taule XX. Appropriation to Equalize School Terms — ConVinxied. 



Jones 

Lee 

Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

McDowell 

Mitchell 

Montgomery. 
Moore 



Northampton _ 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pender 

Perquimans.. - 

Polk 

Randolph 

Rockingham. . 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Stanly 

Stokes 



Surry . 



Transylvania . 
Union 



Counties. 



Warren 

Washington 

Watauga 

Wilkes 

Yadkin . 

Yancey 

Supervision teacher-training . 
Total 



Number Districts 
Asking Aid. 



White. 



Colored. 



28 


20 


27 


17 


59 


13 


59 


4 


71 


4 


46 


7 


65 


4 


60 


18 


66 


30 


36 


30 


52 


21 


39 


19 


22 


14 


44 


38 


23 


14 


28 


9 


102 


22 


60 


35 


51 


6 


89 


39 


61 


11 


67 


10 


68 


10 


30 


2 



55 

29 
25 

72 

129 

54 

46 



33 

18 

4 

17 



3,181 



1,105 



Amount 
Legally 

Askerl. 



915.92 
1,252.68 
1,318.78 
1,080.00 
2,770.73 
1,927.89 
1,679.35 

764.77 
2,751.21 

928.00 
1,427.50 
1,028.37 
2,609.86 
1,500.00 

400.00 

372.00 j 

1,979 45 ' 

1 

1,565.30 I 
2,098.70 I 

2,403.74 ! 

I 
831.57 ! 

2,391.81.1 

1, ,500. 00 I 

2,254.13 I 

1,746.05 I 

975.00 

90.60 

2,346.00 

7,852.00 

1,232.00 

2,438.20 



Amount 
Appor- 
tioiuid. 



121,790.46 



824.33 
1,127.42 
1,186.91 

972.00 
2,216.59 
1,927.89 
l,343.4.s 

688.30 
2,476.09 

882.07 
1,284.75 

976.95 
2,087.89 
1,3.50.00 

380.00 

334.80 
1,649.54 
1,408.77 
1,888.83 
2,163.37 

789.99 
1,913.45 
1,350 00 
1,803.31 
1,571.45 

926.25 
89.83 
1,876.80 
5,234.67 
1,108.80 
1,950.56 
1,200.00 
100,000.00 



252 



Report of Loaist Fund^ 1908-'10. 



TABLE XXI. REPORT OF LOAN FUND, 1908-'10. 

This report shows by ooiiuties the amouut of money loaued to the districts 
therein named, from June 30, 190S, to June 30, 1910. 

Loan Fund Summaey. 



Total amount loaned since 1903, when fund was created 

Number of counties aided 

Number of districts aided 

Number of children in districts aided 

Number of new houses built with this fund.. - 

Value of the new houses built 

Value of houses replaced ." 

Total amount of loans from June 30, 1908, to June 30, 1910 

Total number of counties receiving loans from June 30, 1908, to June 30, 1910.. 



$ 523,280.50 

89 

1.109 

159,175 

995 

$1,265,788.00 

158,601.00 

122,000.00 

65 





Number 

of 
Children. 


Value 
of Old 

Building 


Value 

of New 

Building. 


Total 
County 
Loans. 


Amount 
of liOan. 


Ai-AMANCE County — 












Saxapahaw _ 


150 


$ 


SI ,000 


$ - -- - 


8 500 


No. 5, Fair Ground. _ - 






i 1 ,600 




800 


No. 2, Graham . — 


56 




800 




600 


No. 4, Pleasant Hill 


123 




! 1 ,000 




600 


No. 4, Boon Station ^ _ 


38 




1 

400 


2,900 


400 


Alleghany County — 






j 






No. 3, Whitehead.-- - 


100 




500 


250 


250 


Anson County— 












Ljlesville __. _. 


120 
65 


40 


3,000 
350 




1 ,500 


No. 2, Burnsville _. _. _ . . - _ 


175 


No. 1, Lilesville (col.)- - 


116 




400 




200 


No. 3, Lilesville (col.) 


142 


25 


500 




250 


No 1, Ansonville (col.) 


113 




400 




200 


No. 1 , Morven 


104 




500 




200 


Lilesville -_ _-.-.-- ..__ 


120 
72 
31 








*530 


No. 2, Wadesboro . 




300 
300 


3,355 


150 


No. 6, Ansonville -. 


150 


Ashe County — 




North Fork.- . - .-- 


115 
95 




600 
500 




250 


No. 1, Piney Creek . 


250 


Gambill _ -. .-.-.... 


110 




1,200 


1,000 


500 


Beaufort County — 




Idalia 


76 




2.000 


1.000 


1.000 



♦Additional loan. 



Eepoet 0¥ Loaa Find, 11)08-'! 0. 



25;] 



Table XXI. Report of Loan Fund — Continued. 



Bladen County — 
French's Creek 

Brunswick County — 

No. 1 , Leland 

No. 1 , Southport 

Town Creek 

Buncombe County — 

No. 1, Ashe'\?ille 

No. 3, Ivey 

No. 4, Asheville 

No. 10, Leicester 

No. 2, Ivey 

No. 4, Upper Hominy. __ 

Burke County — 

No. 1 , Connelly Springs _ . 

Cabarrus County— 

Concord 

No. 1, Rocky River 

Caldwell County — 

No. 1, Little River 

Camden County — 

No. 5, Shiloh 

Carteret County — 

No. 12, Smyrna 

Morehead City 

Catawba County — 

Long View 

No. 9, Hickory 

No. 16, Hickory 

No. 5, Newton ' 

(.Chatham County — 

No. 2, Center 

No. 4, Hickory Mountain- 
Merry Oaks 

Hickory Mountain 

No. 1, Riggsbee __ 

Cherokee County — 

No. 14, Murphy 

No. 1 , Valley to wn 





Number 

of 
Children. 


Value 

of Old 

Building. 


Value 
of New- 
Building. 


Total 

County 
Loans. 


Amount 
of Jyoan. 


-- 


59 

125 
238 
107 

484 
200 
500 
98 
101 
100 

'200 

2,334 
127 

110 

60 

130 
591 

75 

79 

245 

102 

42 
70 
122 
65 
76 

48 
138 


$ 







220 
115 

25 
500 


$1 ,200 

4,000 
4,000 
1,000 

2,000 
800 
5,000 
1,150 
1,200 
500 

650 

4,500 
1,500 

1,200 

1,200 

600 
5,000 

1,.500 
900 

1,400 
600 

300 
300 
1,000 
285 
700 

400 
1,100 


$ 600 
2,775 

4,400 
300 

2,250 
500 
600 

2,700 
1,800 

950 

400 


$ 600 

2,000 
400 


-- 


37.5 
1 ,000 




400 




1 ,800 




500 




500 




200 




300 


-- 


2,000 
250 




.500 




600 




200 




2,500 




800 




450 




400 




1.50 




150 




100 




500 




100 




100 




200 

200 



•254: 



Report of Loan Fund^ lOOS-'lO. 



Table XXI. Report of Loan Fund — Continued. 



Number 

of 
Children. 



Value [ Value Total 4^01 in t 

of Old of New ' County ^P\ " ,: 

Building. Building.: Loans. °* ^°^"- 



Clay County — 

No. 4, Brasstown 

Cleveland County — 

Fallston - - 

Kings Mountain 

Shelby _ _ 

Columbus County — 

No. 1, Chadbourn _ _ _ 

Tatums 

•Shoal Creek 

No. 3, Pleasant Hill 

No. 4, Bug Hill 

No. 8, Whiteville . 

Cr-^ven County — 

Dover 

Cumberland County — 

No. 9, Cedar Creek _ 

No. 11, Manchester 

Currituck County — 

No. 8, Poplar Branch 

No. 6, Poplar Branch 

Duplin County — 

No. 4, Faison 

No. 2, Rockflsh 

Durham County — 

East Durham 

■ Bahama 

Edgecombe County — 

No. 8, Township No. 2 

No. 4, Township No. 1 

No. 3, Township No. 3 

No. 12, Township No. 2 

No. 13, Township No. 1 

No. 9, Township No. 4 

No. 9, Township No. 1 (coD- 

No. 9, Township No. 2 

No. 7, Township No. 3 

No. 10, Township No. 2 



74 $_ 

152 __ 
625 _ 



290 
101 
SO 
45 
65 
70 



50 



100 



$ 300 


$ 1,50 


$ 150 


300 




150 


15,000 





1 ,000 


35,000 


1 ,650 


500 


3,000 




500 


1,000 




500 


400 


— - - 


50 


500 


- _ — 


250 


7.50 




300 


7.50 


1,900 


300 



200 

89 
64 

112 
85 



270 
280 



5,000 

750 
1 ,275 



2 , 500 



1,010 



118 

748 
131 

50 

106 

71 

79 

40 

164 

140 

72 



40 



3,000 ! 

1,200 1,300 

I 

15,000 I 

1.000 i 5,500 



650 

450 

1,100 

650 

500 

500 

500 

650 

1,250 

1,600 



3,675 



2 , 500 

375 
635 



1,000 - 500 

1 ,200 1 .000 500 



1,000 
300 

5,000 
500 

300 
225 
550 
125 
250 
250 
250 
300 
625 
800 



Report of Loan Ff.n'I), 1908-'10. 



255 



Table XXI. Report of Loan Fund — Continued. 



CiASTON County — 

No. 3, River Bend 

No. 1, South Point 

No. S, South Point 

No. 3, Gastonia 

.Mount Holly 

No. S, River Bend 

No. 4, South Point 

Gates County — 

No. 1, Winterville 

Granvili/E County — 

No. 7, Dutchville 

No. 1, Tally Ho 

No. 2, Sassafras 

No. 4 Tally Ho 

No. 1, Walnut Grove 

No. 7, Walnut Grove 

No. 3, Salem 

Stem 

Greene County' — 

No. 3, Old Town 

Guilford County — 

Jamestown 

Pleasant Garden . 

Springfleld 

Monticello 

Gibsonville 

Nos. 2, 3 and 4, Jefferson. 

Harnett County - 

Haywood County — 

No. 3, Ivy Hill 

Henderson County — 

Balfour 

Hyde County — 

No. 9, Lake Landing 



Number Value 
of of Old 

Children. IBuilding. 



Value 

of New 
Building. 



Total 
County 
Loans. 



65 $ $ 400 

•2 - 400 

04 , 400 

64 i 25 400 

491 8,000 

56 550 



45 

96 

97 
78 

122 
64 
64 
84 
38 

110 

100 



50 
50 



550 

1,600 

400 
700 
450 
500 
550 
300 
300 
4,000 

1 ,000 



100 



900 



Amount 
of Loan. 



,700 



TOO 



3,375 



500 



2,000 3,625 



450 



200 
200 
200 
200 
1 ,500 
200 
200 

700 

200 
350 
225 
175 
200 
75 
150 
2,000 

500 

*500 

*500 

*375 

500 

750 

1,000 

4.50 



.500 250 250 



155 2,500 I 1,000 1,000 

i ! i 

220 700 3,000 1,000 1,000 



*.A.dditional loan. 



256 



Keport of Loax Fuxd. 1908-'10. 



Table XXI. Report of Loan Fund — Continued. 



Iredell. County — 

Statesville 

No. 5, Statesville 

No. 6, Statesville. ^ 

No. 5, Davidson 

No. 4, Concord _ 

Jones County — 

No. 2, White Oak 

No. 3, Chinquapin 

Cypress Creek 

No. 3, Cypress Creek 

Lenoir County — 
LaGrange 

Lincoln County- 
No. 2, Daniels 

Catawba School 

Madison County — 

No. 1 , Marshall 

No. 16, Ivy Ridge 

No. 6, Bethel 

Lower California 

Martin County — 

No. 1, Jamesville 

Montgomery County — 
District No. 

Nash County — 

No. 1, Dry Wells 

Mount Pleasant 

Red Oak 

Onslow County — 

No. 4, Swansboro 

No. 11, Stump Sound 

No. 5, White Oak 

No. 1, Richlands (col.)_ 

No. 3, Sound (col.) 

No. 3, Richlands (col.), 
No. 4, White Oak (col.). 



Number Value Value '• Total I Am^,,,,, 
of of Old of New , County I ^J^l^i, 

Children. Building. Building.: Loans. '°'^oa.i\. 



$ $ I $*1,000 

5.50 I 200 

1,200 500 

.500 150 

400 1,9.50 100 




800 

800 

500 

700 1,400 

10,000 1,000 



500 
1 , 500 



1 ,000 



15,000 . 

.500 i 

600 I 

600 2,350 



86 
67 

265 

265 



65 
81 
65 
81 
65 
134 
88 



1,200 



500 



600 



180 



40 



350 
400 
300 
3.50 

1,000 

250 
750 

1,750 
200 
200 
200 

600 

180 



1,800 




7.50 


2,000 




750 


2,000 


2,500 


1 .000 


200 




125 


600 


~ 


250 


400 




200 


400 




200 


300 




1.50 


600 




300 


.500 


1 ,475 


2.50 



♦Additional loan. 



Keport of Loan Fund, 190 8-' 10. 



9^x 



) i 



Table XXI. Report of Loan Fund — Continued. 





Number 

of 
Children. 


Value 

of Old 

Building. 


Value 

of New 

Building. 


Total 
County 
Loans. 


Amount 
of Loan. 


Pamlico County — 

No 3 TownshiD No 3 




$ .. - 


$2,000 

5,000 

8,000 

400 
400 
400 

1,000 
425 
300 
500 

1,000 
500 

1,200 
500 
500 
750 
500 
500 

1,000 
750 

2,600 
500 
500 

1,200 

1,000 

8,000 

650 

3,200 

1,450 

14,000 


$ 430 
2,000 
1,500 

450 

6,020 


6,000 


$ 430 


Pasquotank County — 
Elizabeth Citv - 


225 
125 




2,000 


Pender County — 

Burgaw - . -_ 


1,500 


Perquimans County — 

No. 2, New Hope. _- 

No 6 Belvidere 


200 
150 


No. 4, Bethel - . ._ 


48 

90 

72 

132 

. 69 

110 

69 

85 

71 

74 

90 

43 

68 

90 

195 

342 

77 

67 

130 

110 

167 
38 
83 
65 

796 


25 

525 

30 
25 
35 
50 
40 
50 

40 
25 
30 
25 

35 

100 




100 


Pitt County — 

No. 9, Chicod - - 


260 


No. 9, Contentnea-- - . - - . 


210 


No. 6, Greenville (col.) 


150 


No. 16, Greenville _. . - 


250 


No. 10, Chicod . ^ ... 


500 


No. 3, Greenville . - - - 


250 


No. 1, Greenville 


600 


No. 9, Greenville ^.. . 


250 


No. 5, Greenville - - . 


250 


No. 7, Swift Creek . 

No. 11, Swift Creek . ... ... ... . 


225 
250 


No. 9, Swift Creek . ... . . 


250 


No. 4, Falkland. .. . . . 


500 


No. 2, Falkland (col.)- .. 


375 


No. 4, Bethel . 


400 


No. .5, Pactolus 


250 


No. 7, Contentnea 


250 


No. 2, Carolina 


500 


No. 14, Chicod. .-._.. 


300 


Randolph County — 
Liberty 


4,000 


No. 2, New JIarket _ 

Coleridge 

No. 1, New Market - 


150 
600 
250 


Randleman 


1,000 



Part 11—17 



258 



Report of Loan Fund^ 1908-'10. 



Table XXI. Report of Loan Fund — Continued. 



Richmond County — 

Roberdel 

No. 2, Rockingham 

No. 6, Steeles 

Robeson County — 

No. 2, Red'Springs 

No. 4, St. Pauls -. 

No. 8, Thompson 

Rockingham County — 

Wentworth 

Rowan County — 

Salisbury 

Rutherford County — 

Nos. 1 and 4, No. 4 Township. 
No. 3, High Shoals 

Sampson County — 

Nos. 3 and 4, North Clinton. . 

Pigf ord 

Glencoe 

Sharon 

Franklin 

Layton 

Stanly County — 

No. 5, Ridenhour 

No. 1, Albemarle (col.) 

No. 2, Ridenhour 

Stokes County — 

No. 2, Yadkin '. 

No. 5, Beaver Island 

No. 2, Beaver Island (col.) 

No. 1, Snow Creek 

Swain County — 

No. 10, Forney's Creek 

Transylvania County — 

Brevard 

Duns Rock 

No. 3, Little River 



Number Value 
of I of Old 
Children. Building. 



80 
41 

142 

140 

51 

100 

2,264 



65 

70 
50 
120 
110 
65 
95 

105 

170 

85 

89 
100 
100 
140 

35 




75 
107 



25 



50 



150 



Value ; Total | Amount 

of New County | ^PV Ji^ 



Building. Loans. 



40 



25 



50 



12 

50 



500 
500 



of Loan. 



750 



1,350 
2,250 

000 1,800 

1,800 900 

I 
25,000 5,000 

Repairs 

400 340 



900 
400 
850 
500 
850 
800 

1,250 
500 
385 

300 
300 
150 
600 ' 

200 



1,290 



600 



625 



100 



*250 
250 
250 

500 

1.000 

300 

900 

5,000 

140 
200 

300 
100 
275 
100 
275 
240 

250 
200 
150 

150 

150 

25 

300 

100 



3,000 




1,500 


300 




150 


1,235 


2,2.50 


600 



♦Additional loan. 



Report of Loan Fund^ 1908-'10. 



259 



Table XXI. Ukpout of Loan Fund- — Continued. 



Wake County — 

No. 2, Holly Springs 

White Oak 

N*. 3, Bear Creek 

No. 8, Swift Creek 

Kaleigh 

No. 3, Holly Springs 

No. 3, Cedar Fork 

No. 3, Little River 

AA'arren County — 

lunbro 

Norlina 

Watauga County — 

^'alle Crucis 

Wayne County — 

No. 8, Grantham 

Wilkes County — 

No. 2, Boomer 

No 2, North Wilkesboro. 

No. 1, Wilkesboro 

Mulberry 

No. 5, Edwards 

No. 5, Wilkesboro 

No. 1, Edwards 

No. 11, Edwards 

No. .5, Wilkesboro 

No. 5, Moravian Falls_- 
No. 5, Rock Creek 

Wilson County — 

No. 1, Stantonsburg 

No. 3. Old Field^. 



Number 

of 
Children. 



130 

105 

36 

74 



Value Value i 

of Old of New I 

Building. Building.' 



Total 



Amount 



County ; ^ 'Y^oan 
Loans. ' "' ^°^"- 



87 

98 

103 

50 



100 



135 

77 

306 

150 

56 

125 
114 



300 
10 
30 



102 ! 25 



71 

88 

139 

105 

101 



$7,270 ' 
6,500 j 

700 
1,650 

10,000 
1,600 
1,600 
1,600 

1,600 
1,500 

1,200 

1,600 

250 
600 



Repairs 

1.000 

2,000 

1 ,000 

20 300 

4,500 

I 550 

370 



3,500 
2,000 



13,275 



1,500 



250 



800 



3,100 



2,500 



$ 3,300 
3,400 
350 
825 
3,000 
800 
800 
800 

800 
700 

250 

800 

100 

300 

50 

t50 

400 

930 

500 

150 

500 

75 

45 

1,500 
1.000 



260 



Local-tax Districts, 1008-'10. 



TABLE XXII. LOCAL-TAX DISTRICTS, 1908-'10. 

The following list shows by counties the number of local-tax districts vnted 
from June 30, 1908, to June 30, 1910. 



Total number of districts voted during this biennial period. 

Total number districts to June 30, 1908 

Total number districts to June 30, 1910 



288 
707 



995 



Counties. 



Alamance. 




per $100 ^?^^^ 

Property i Pountv 
Valuation.! "-ountj . 



Alexander. 



Anson. 



Beaufort. 



Bertie- 
Bladen . 



Buncombe. 



Burke. 



Boon Station 

No. 4, Burlington 

No. 2, Glen Hope 

No. 5, Lee Point 

No. 6, McCray 

No. 1, Elmira 

Taylorsville 

Hiddenite 

No. 7, LanesboroJ 

No. 1, Gulledge 

No. 1, Burnsville 

No. 4, Bath 

No. 9, Richland 

No. 7, Richland 

Old Ford 

No. 11, Chowinity... 
No. 11, Richland. __. 

No. 3, Bath 

Kelford 

No. 4, French Creek 
No. 5, French Creek 
No. 12, Bladenboro.- 

White Oak 

Elk Mountain 

Beech 

Hemphill 

Black Mountain 

Shiloh 

Chestnut Grove 

Tweed 

No. 1, Silver Creek.. 
No. 4, Silver Creek.. 



April, 

May, 

May, 

Nov., 

May, 

June, 

May, 

May, 

July, 

Mar., 

June, 

Dec, 

Oct., 

Oct., 

Feb., 

May, 

May, 

June, 

Oct., 

Oct., 

Oct., 

Nov., 

May, 

April, 

April, 

April, 

May, 

May, 

May, 

May, 

Nov., 

Nov., 



1909 I $ 

1909 

1910 

1900 

1910 

1910 

1909 

1909 

1909 

1910 

1910 

1909 

1909 

1909 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1909 

1909 

1909 

1909 

1910 

1909 

1909 

1909 

1909 

1909 

1909 

1909 

1909 , 

1909 



0.30 



Local-tax Disteicts, 1908-'10. 



261 



Table XXI. Local-tax Districts — Continued. 



Counties. 



Local-tax Districts. 



Burke — (con.) 



('ah,\rrus. 



No. 1, Linville 

No. 2, Linville 

Rocky River 

No. 3, 10 Township 
No. 2, Little River - 

Beaufort 

Milton 

No. 5, Hickory 

No. 19, Hickory 

Chatham - \ No. 6, Gulf 

No. 6, New Hope 

Cherokee 



Caldwell 
Carteret . 
Caswell _ 
Catawba- 



Chowan- 



Clay 

Cleveland . 

Columbus.. 



Craven . 



Currituck. 



Duplin.. 
Durham. 



Edgecombe. 

Forsyth 

Franklin _ . 
Gaston 



Peach Tree 

No. 1, Beaver Dam 

No. 4, Notla 

No. 1, Shoal Creek 

Golberry 

Center Hill 

Brasstown 

No. 24, Grover 

Mooresborp 

No. 7, Chadbouni 

No. 10, Williams 

No. 8, Fair Bluff 

No. 3, 3 Township 

No. 1, 1 Township 

No. 1, K. Island 

Wash Woods 

Old Inlets 

Moss Point . 

No. 3, Magnolia 

Laws Grove 

Shambly 

Whites Cross Roads 

Tarboro Township 

Lewisville 

No. 3, Harris Township. 

Rankin 

Stanley 



When 
Voted. 



Nov., 

Nov., 

Oct., 

May, 

Mar., 

May, 

May, 

May, 

May, 

Oct., 

May, 

May, 

Jan., 

May, 

May, 

June, 

June, 

May, 

May, 

June, 

June, 

Jan., 

Aug., 

Feb., 

Feb.. 

May, 

May, 

May, 

May, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

June, 

April, 

June, 

July, 

Feb., 

May, 



1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1909 
1910 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1909 
1909 



Rate 

per .SlOO 

Pro pert y 

Valuation. 



Total 

for 

County. 



0.20 



..30 
.30 
..30 



.25 
.30 



..30 
.25 
.20 
.30 

.30 

30 
.161 
.15 
.30 
.20 



.20 
.25 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 



.20 
.20 
.20 
.40 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.20 



4 
1 



262 



Local-tax Districts, 1908-'10. 



Table XXII. Local-tax Districts — Continued. 



Counties. 



Local-tax Districts. 



When 
Voted. 



Rate 
per $100 



Total 
for 



Property i cnunt^- 
Valuation, ^ountj . 



Gaston — (con.)_ 



Gates- 



Granville. 



Greene . . 
Guilford. 



Haywood . 



Henderson. 



Hertford . 



Hyde. 



Iredell. 



Belmont 

No. 8, River Bend 

No. 7, Cherryville 

No. 1, Reynoldson 

No. 1 , Bosley 

No. 2, Bosley 

No. 1, Hunter's Mill 

Wilton 

Benehan 

No. 4, Fishing Creeli 

No. 6, Fishing Creek 

No. 6, Brassfield 

Salem Township (3 Dists.). 

: Enon 

Cheatham 

No. 3, Olds Township 

No. 2, Sedalia 

No. 3, JIcLeansville 

No. 4, Oak Hill 

No. 1, Palmer In.stitute 

No 3, McLeansville (col.) . 

Concord School 

No. 4, Jonathan Creek 

No. 3, Waynesville 

No. 1, Pigeon 

No. ], Ea.st Fork 

No. 2, Edneyville 

Fontana 

Blue Ridge 

Ahoskie 

No. 4, Harrellsville 

No. 1 , Winton 

No. 3, Hickory Chapel 

No. 9, Lake Landing 

No. 5, Currituck 

No. 2, Swan Quarter.. 

No. 5, Davidson 

No. 2, Statesville 



May, 

Aug., 

May, 

May, 

Aug., 

Aug., 

Sept., 

May, 

June, 

June, 

June, 

April, 

April, 

May, 

May, 

Sept., 

May, 

May, 

May, 

May, 



1909 
1909 
1910 

1909 j. 

1910 ' 

1910 

1910 

1909 

1909 

1909 

1909 ; 

I 

1909 I 

1909 ' 

1910 

1910 

1909 

1909 

1909 I 
1 
1909 

1909 



May, 1910 
Mar., 1909 
April, 1909 
April, 1909 
May, 1910 
April, 1909 
May, 1909 
Oct., 1909 
May, 1909 
May, 1909 
May, 1909 
May, 1909 
April, 1909 
April, 1909 
May, 1910 
May, 1909 
Mar., 1909 



0.20 
.30 
.30 



,30 I 
.25 
.30 
.30 
.20 
.20 
.20 
.30 
.20 
.15 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 



.30 

20 

.15 

.40 



50 I 

i 

.20 
.15 

9.' 



Voted in 



.17 
.10 



s 
1 



crease. 



Local-tax Districts, 1908-'10. 



268 



Tablk XXII. Local-tax Districts — Continued. 



Counties. 



Iredell — (,con.) 



Jackson- 



JOHNSTON . 



Martin. 



McDOWELL- 



JONES__. 

Lee 

Lenoir-. 
Lincoln 

Madison 



Local-tax Districts. 

No. 8, Davidson 

No. 6, Shiloh 

No. 1, Cool Spring 

No. 1, Olin 

No. 6, Statesville 

No. 4, Canada 

No. 5, Canada 

No. 2, Cashions 

No. 1, Clayton 

No. 12, Beulah 

No. 6, Meadow 

No. 7, Meadov/ 

No. 6, Pleasant Grove- 
No. 6, Bentonville 

No. 2, Ingram 

No. 2, Clayton 

No. 3, Clayton 

No. 3, Cypress Creek.. 

No. 1, Jonesboro 

No. 1, West Sanford.. 
No. 4, West Sanford.- 

No. 1 , Contentnea 

No. 3, North Brook... 

No. 3, Ironton 

Daniels School 

Bull Creek . 

English 

Middle Fork 

Bethel 

Lower California 

Spring Creek Seminary. 
No. 2, Poplar Branch. 

No. 26, Hamilton 

Everetts 

No. 9, North Cove 

No. 1, Bracketts 

No. 2, Bracketts 

No. 2, Marion 



When 
Voted. 



Mar., 

Mar., 

May, 

May, 

June, 

Feb., 

Mar., 

Mar., 

Aug., 

Dec, 

Mar., 

Mar., 

May, 

May, 

May, 

May, 

May, 

Nov., 

June, 

June, 

June, 

May, 

Mar., 

Mar., 

May, 

May, 

May, 

May, 

May, 

May. 

May, 

Sept., 

Sept., 

May, 

April, 

June, 

June, 

June, 



1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 



Rate ] -pritoi 

per $100 I ^PV 

Properly - cnuntv 

Va.liiatinn ^OUnty. 



Valuation. 



0.15 
.30 
.20 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.20 



.30 
.30 
.30 
.20 
.30 
.30 
.30 



.20 
.30 
.10 
.30 
.30 
.20 
.20 
.10 
.30 
.25 
.20 



.10 
.20 
.20 
.20 



264 



LOCAT.-TAX DiSTKICTS, 1908-'10. 



Table XXII. Local-tax Districts — Continued. 



Counties. 



McDowell — {con . ) 



Mecklenburg _ 



Mitchell- 



Moore . 



Nash- 



Local-tax Districts. 



New Hanoveh 
Northampton . 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 



No. 5, Marion 

No. 1, Broad River 

No. 2, Broad River 

No. 3, Marion •_ 

Trinity 

Sardis 

Long Creelv 

No. 2, Bakersville 

No. 4, Ellc Park 

Little River Creek 

Minneapolis 

Long Branch ^ 

Back Creek 

White Oak 

Roaring Township 

No. 7, McNeill 

Whole Township (11 Dists.) 

Springfield 

Eureka 

Keyser 

Lewis School 

Deans 

Carter 

No. 2, North Whitakers 

No. 3, North Whitakers 

Taylors 

Philadelphus 

Middlesex ■ 

Gold Valley 

Whole county 

Jackson 

Potecasi 

No. 2, Dawson 

West Chapel Hill 

Hillsboro __- 

Efland 

University 

Stonewall 



Rate 

When per $100 

Voted. I Property 
Valuation. 



June, 

Mar. , 

Mar., 

June, 

Oct., 

June, 

June, 

June, 

Feb., 

Mar., 

April. 

April, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

May, 

Mar., 

May, 

May, 

June, 

May, 

May, 

May, 

June, 

June, 

June, 

June, 



1910 I $ 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1909 

1910 

1910 

1909 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1909 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1910 

1910 



May, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

June, 

May, 



1909 
1910 
1910 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1909 



0.20 
.20 
.20 



.25 
.15 
.10 



.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 



.20 
.20 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 



.30 



.30 
.15 
.20 
.20 
.20 
.30 



Total 

for 

County. 



Local-tax Districts, 1908-'10. 



205 



Table XXII. Local-tax Districts — Continued. 



Coiiiilies. 



Pamlico — (con.) . 
Pender 



Local-tax Districts. 



Person 

Randolph - 



Richmond. 



Robeson. 



Bayboro 

No. 1, Canetuck 

No. 2, Canetuck 

No. 3, Canetuck 

No. 4, Canetuck 

Hampstead 

No. 3, Holly 

Vista 

Rhyne 

Bethel Hill 

No. 2, Liberty 

No. 3, Black Creek. __ 
No. 5, Tabernacle- - - . 

No. 1, Trinity 

No. 5, Trinity 

No. 6, Trinity 

No. 5, New Market 

No. 1, Tabernacle- --- 

No. 8, Tabernacle 

No. 4, Liberty 

Sophia 

Oak Shade 

No. 4, Beaver Dam 

No. 5, Nanford 

No. 6, Mineral Springs. 

No. 7, Steele's 

No. 2, Mark's Creek-.. 

No. 4, Mark's Creek 

No. 7, Mineral Springs. 

No. 2, Rockingham 

No. 2, Wolf Pit 

No. 1, Mineral Springs. 
No. 6, Mark's Creek--. 

No. 5, Blue Springs 

No. 5, Sterlings 

Thompson 

Alf ordsville 

Peurvis 



When 
Voted. 



May, 

Mar. , 

Mar., 

Mar., 

Mar., 

May, 

June, 

May, 

May, 

April, 

May, 

May, 

May, 

June, 

June, 

June, 

June, 

June, 

June, 

Mar., 

May, 

May, 

May, 

May, 

June, 

Nov., 

Mar., 

Mar. , 

May, 

June, 

June, 

Oct., 

Nov., 

Oct., 

Feb., 

Feb., 

Mar., 

Mar., 



1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
^910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 



per SI 00 I '^^9}'}^ 
Property '"'^ 

Valuation. 



$ 0. 30 



.30 
.20 
.25 
.30 
.30 
.20 
.30 
.20 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.20 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.20 
.30 
.30 
.20 
.30 
.30 
.30 



.25 
.30 
.20 
.25 



County. 



12 



11 



266 



LocAi.-TAX Districts, lt)08-'10. 



Table XXII. Local-tax Districts — Continued. 



Comities. 


Local-tax Districts. 


"Robeson — (con.) 


No. 1, Alfordsville 




No. 4, Regans 




No. 1, Blue Springs 




No. 3, Blue Springs 


*■ 


No. 2, Alma 


Hock INGHAM 


Leaksville 




Went worth 




Bahamas 




No. 1, Ruffln 




No. 1, Simpsonville 




No 2, New Bethel - 







Rate 
When per -SI 00 

Voted. 



Total 

Property rJimtv 
Valuation. ; '-ountj . 



Ro\v.\N. 



Rutherford. 



Sampson 



Scotland. 



Stanly. 



No. 3, New Bethel- 
No. 1, Mount Ulla 

No. 3, China Grove 

Salisbury 

Oak Grove 

Bost ic 

Floyd's Creek 

Dobbins 

Providence 

Mount Pleasant 

No. 10, Township No. 9. 
No. 2, Township No. 2. 

Welcome " 

Wrench 

Harrell's Store 

Mingo 

Layton 

Piney Green 

Turkey 

Spring Branch 

Honeycutts 

Naylor 

No. 3, Hasty 

No. 4, Laurel Hill 

No. 2, Spring Hill 

No. 3, Laurel Hill 

New London 



May, 1909 

Oct., 1909 

Oct., 1909 

Mar., 1910 

April, I'JIO 

May, 1909 

April, 1909 

May, 1909 

May, 1910 

May, 1910 

June, 1910 

June, 1910 

Mar., 1910 

May, 1910 

May. 1910 

May, 1909 

June, 1909 

June. 1909 

June, 1909 

June, 1909 

June, 1909 

June, 1910 

June, 1910 

Sept., 1908 

Sept., 1908 

Sept., 1908 

Jan., 1909 

Jan., 1909 

Jan., 1909 



Jan., 
May, 



1909 
] 909 



Mar., 1910 

July, 1909 

Dec, 1909 

April „ 1910 

June, 1910 

June, 1910 

May, 1910 



0.30 , 

I 
,30 ! 

.30 

.30 j 

I 
.30 I 

.25-| 

.30 ! 

.20 ' 

.25 i 

I 
20 i 

15 

.15 

.15 

.10 

.15 

.15 



30 I 

.30 
.30 
.30 

30 

30 

30 

30 

.30 
.30 



.30 
.30 
.30 



10 



10 



Local-tax Districts, 1008-'10. 



26' 



Table XXII. Local-tax Districts — Continued. 



Counties. 



Local-tax Districts. 



Wlieii 
Voted. 



Stanly — (con.). 

Stokes 

SURKY- . 



Rate 

per .1100 

Property 

Valuation. 



Swain. 



Transylvania . 



Tyrrell . 
Union 



Wake- 



No. 1, .'Umond- 

Kiiigs 

Elliin 

j No. 1, Shoals.. 

! Bushnell 

Ela 



Warren. 



Gloucester . 

No. 2, Royal 

Columbia 

No. 6, Sandy Ridge 

No. 2, Wingate 

No. 2, Gilboa 

No. 6, Jenkins 

No. 7, Beulah 

No. 4, Indian Trail 

No. 7, Buford ., 

No. 1 1, Goose Creek 

No. 12, New Salem 

No. 8, Buford 

No. 1, Lanes Creek .. 

No. 3, Marshville 

No. 1.3, Secrest j 

No. 10, Shiloh.. ! 

No. 4, Mills . 1 

No. 6, Mount Pleasant 

No. 1 , Weddington 

No. 8, Flat Ridge 

No. 1, Buckhorn 

No. 4, House Creek 

No. 2, House Creek 

No. 3, Buckhorn 

No. 1, Middle Creek 

No. 1, St. Matthews 

No. 3, Cedar Fork 

No. 4, Little River 

No. 5, St. Matthews 

Norlina 



May, 

May, 

April, 

Feb., 

Feb., 

June, 

Mar., 

Aug., 

June, 



1910 $ 0.30 



1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1909 
1909 
1910 



Sept., 

Nov., 

May, 

May, 

May, 

May, 

Oct., 

Oct., 

Oct., 

Oct., 

July, 

June, 

June, 

June, 

June, 

June, 

June, 

June, 

Feb., 

April. 

April, 

April, 

April, 

May, 

May, 

April, 

June, 

Feb., 



1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1900 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1909 



.30 



.15 



.25 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.20 
.20 



.30 
.30 
.30 
.40 
.20 
.20 
.25 
.20 
.30 
.30 



Total 

for 

County. 



18 



268 



Local-tax Disteicts, 1908-'10, 



Table XXII. Local-tax Distbicts — Continued. 



Counties. 



Warren — (con.) . 



Washington. 
Wayne 



Wilkes. 



Wilson. 



Yadkin. 



Yancey. 



Total districts voted 
in counties 



Local-tax Districts. 



Olive 

Embro 

Axtell 

Nos. 6 and 7, Scuppernong. 

No. 8, Grantham 

No. 3, Grantham 

No. 7, Brogden 

Grant 

Godwin ^ 

Beaver Dam 

Boomer, No. 2 



When 
Voted. 



May, 
May, 
May, 
May, 
June, 
May, 
May, 
June, 
June, 
June, 
Sept., 



Walnut Cove ' Sept., 

No. 5, Wilkesboro..j..-^__ May, 

No. 5, Walnut Grove ' June, 

No. 2, Antioch June, 

No. 10, Mulberry June, 

No. 7, Old Fields May, 

No. 5, Old Fields 1 May, 

No. 4, Black Creek June, 



Boonville- 

Center 

Bee Log-- 



April, 

May, 

Dec, 



1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1909 
1909 
1909 



per $100 I '^Ptf'l 
Property ^"' 
Valuation. 



County. 



0.30 
.30 
.30 
.10 
.30 
.30 
.30 



.30 
.30 
.50 
.30 
.30 



.25 
.30 
.20 



288 



Report of Rukal Libraries^ 1908-'10. 



269 



TABLE XXIII. REPORT OF RURAL LIBRARIES, 1908-'10. 

The following list shows the number of libraries established in the tlifferent 
counties from June 30. lOOS, to June 30, 1910. 

The State gives $10 to each original library and $5 to each supplemental 
library. Equal amounts are given by the county board of education in Uk^ 
counties where these libraries are located and the same amount raised jni- 
vately in the districts. In many instances the districts give more than enough 
to meet the requirements of the law. 

Summary of Rural Ldjearies. 



Total number original libraries to June 30, 1910 

Total number supplemental libraries to June 30, 1910 

Total number of original libraries established from June 30, 1908, to June 30, 1910. 
Total number supplemental June 30, 1908, to June 30, 1910 



2,420 

428 

528 

76 



County. 


Where Established. 


When 
Estab- 
lished. 


Total 
Originals. 


Supple- 
mental. 


Alamance.. 


No. 7, Newlin ■ __ . ._ . . 


1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 








No. 1, Haw River _ 








No. 2, Albright-- .-. 








No. 2, Cross Roads _ 








No. 3, Patterson- 








No. 1, Morton. -.„ 








No. 2, Graham. _ . 








Total. - - 








7 






No. 3, EUendale - 


1909 
1910 




Alexander 








No. 2, Millers . 








Total _ 


•■ 






2 






No. 4, Prathers Creek,- - . 


1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 




Alleghany _ . 








No. 7, Glade Creek- .- . - 








No. 4, Cranberry 








No. 3, Glade Creek . .. -__ -. 








Total -- -- 








4 






No. 1, Lilesville _ _ _ - - 


190S 
1910 




Anson .. _. 








No. 4, Wadesboro _ _. _ _ 








Total _-_ ... - 








2 






No. 1, Grassy Creek 


1 
1909 

1909 ' 




Ashe 




1 




No. 2, North Fort 







Note.— Each couny is entitled to six original libraries and six supplemental libraries from 
each biennial appropriation of $7,500. 

Some of the counties have not availed themselves of the opportunity, and the law pro- 
vides that funds not applied for on or before the 30th of November, biennially, may be given 
to the counties meeting the original conditions, regardless of the number of libraries previously 
established. This explains why some counties have a large number in excess of the six during 
some of the biennial periods. 



270 



Repoet of Rukal Libkakiew^ 1908-'10. 



Table XXIII. Rural Libraries — Continued. 



County. 
Ashe — (con.)-_ 



Beaufort. 



Bertie. 



Brunswick. 



Buncombe. 



Burke . 



Where Established. 


When 
Estab- 
lished. 


Total 
Originals. 


Supple- 
mental. 


No. 9, Jefferson . 


1909 
1909 
1910 






No. 2, Grassy Creek. _ . 




No. 4, Old Fields 












Total-- - - - -- 


5 


1 




1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 




No. 7, Long Acre - -. . 






No. 6, Pantego . 




1 


No. 10, Richland 






No. 6, Eath_ -...-. . ----... 






No. 8, Chocowinity. - . - 






No. 11, Chocowinity. ..- 




1 


No. 1 1 , Long Acre . . . . . 






No 9, Chocowinity _ 












Total- .-- 


8 


2 




1909 
1910 
1910 




No. 1, Roxobel 






No. 3, Roxobel -- - ..- 






No. 4, Merry Hill-. -. .. ■ 












Total -- --- 


3 






1910 
1910 




No. 4, Town Creek ... 






No. 4, Shallotte . .. ..- 












Total . --. - - 


2 






1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 




No. 5, Leicester 






No. 4, Asheville-. 






No. 1, Lower Hominy . . 






No. 4, Lower Hominy -- 


-. 




No. 12, Leicester 






No. 3, Swannanoa. .--. . 






No. 8, Leicester 




No. 2, Black Mountain. _. . . 




No. 1, Black Mountain- - - -. 






No. 6, Ream's Creek . - . . . _ 






No. 4, Ream's Creek. .. _ .. .. 












Total 


11 






1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 




Glen Alpine ... 






No. 1, Lower Creek. _. -- 






No. 6, Morganton. - .. 






No. 2, Silver Creek- - -. . 












Total 


4 











Report of Eural Libraries, 1908-'10. 



271 



Table XXIII. Rural Libraries — Continued. 



County. 



Cabarrus . 



Caldweli> 



Camdkx . 



CASWEI..L . 



(^•VTAWnA. 



Chatham. 



No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No, 
No, 
No, 
No, 



Where Established. 

4— No. 10 

2— No. 3 

2— No. 2 

.3— No. 7 

2— No. .5 

1— No. 1 

Total 

1, Patterson 

5, Little River 

7, Lenoir 

4 , Patterson 

2, Yadkin Valley (col.). 
Total 

17, South Mills 

18, South Mills 

11, Court House 

9, Smyrna 

41, White Oak 

37, New Port 

6, Hunting Quarter- - 

32, Beaufort 

Total 

8, Dan River 

7, Dan River (col.) 

33, Milton 

37, Pelham 

Total -- 

15, Hickory 

5, Jacob's Fork 

13, Hickory 

9, Mount Creek 

9, Hickory 

Total 

1, Hadley 

4, Williams 

4, Hickory Mountain.. 

4, Gulf 

8, Bear Creek 



When 
Estab- 
lished. 



1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 



Total 
Originals. 



1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 



1908 
1908 
1909 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 



1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 



1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 



1908 
1908 
1908 

1909 
1910 



Supple- 
mental. 



272 



Report of Rural Libraries^ lOOS-'lO. 



Table XXIII. Rural Libraries — Continued. 



County. 


Where Established. 


When 
Estab- 
lished. 


Total 
Originals. 


Supple- 
mental. 


CHATH.\M— (f 0?! .) 


No 5 Hickory Mountain 


1910 
1910 
1910 







No. 2, Oakland 

No. 3, Hickory Mountain 

Total _ . - - _ 




















8 






No. 1, Edenton 

C, Fourth Township 

D, Yeopim 

A, Middle- 


1908 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 




Chowan 


























No. 1, Middle 

Total 












5 






No. 67—10 - 

No. 52 — 8 


1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 




Cleveland _ . . . . 








• 


1 




No. 35 — • 6 - . - - 









No. 5— "2 _ _ - . . - _ 


■ 






No. 64—10 

No. 43 — 7 















No. 18— 4 

No. 70 — 11 - - - 














Total 








8 


1 




No. 11, Taturas 

No. 7, Fair Bluff 

No. 1, Bolton 


1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 

1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 




Columbus 














No. 3, Lees 








No. 2, Western Prong 

No. 8, Whiteville 

No 5, Eansom 

No. 2, Bughill 

Total - 

No. 1—8 

No. 1—9 

No. 5—1 

No. 6—1 

No. 3— 5 

No. 2— 9 

No. 1—6 

No. 2—9 

No. 1—9 

Total 














i 












8 




Cr.wex « _ - . 




1 












































' 










9 


1 











Report or Rural Libraries, 1908-'10. 



273 



Table XXIII. Rukal Libraries — Continued. 



County. 


Where Estabhshed. 


When 
Estab- 
lished. 


Total 
Originals. 


Supple- 
mental. 


Cumberland 


No. 5, Black River - 


1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 




1 




No. 6, Cedar Creek 




1 




No. 1, Cross Creek 




1 




No. 2, Beaver Dam _, _ _ _ ._ 








No. 1, Beaver Dam _.-.___ 








No. 6, Gray's Creek . . 








No. 6, Seventy-first - - 








No. 2, Gray's Creek 








No. 2, Flea Hill . ... 








Total 








9 


3 




No. 3, Poplar Branch ... 


1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 




Currituck ._ 








No. 1, Fruitville . 








No. 7, Crawford . 








No. 4, Moyock. . _ - 








No. 2, Atlantic . . 








Total - . - . . . 








5 






No. 2, Rothrock 


1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 




Davidson _._ .- - . 








No. 2, Boston . . . _ 








No. 2, Lexington. _ ._ . __ 








No. 1 1 , Thomasville 








No. 2, Abbott's Creek ... . 








No. 2, Silver Hill.. ... . . 








Total . - 








6 






No. 1, Smith Grove 


1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 




Davie - . 








No. 5, Shady Grove ... 








No. 5, Mocksville . 








No. 4, Jerusalem .. . .. 








No. 4, Clarksville. . . . . 








No. 2, Jerusalem. . . 




1 




Total . - 








6 


1 




Warsaw _ .. . . _ 


1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 




Duplin 








No. 3, Smith's 








No. 3, Warsaw.. _ _ _. 








No. 1 , Warsaw 








No. 3, Glessons .... 








Total ..... 








5 






No. 5, Patterson 


1908 
1908 




Durham 








No. 2. Durham 







Part II— IS. 



274 



Report of Rural Libraries;, 1908-'10. 



Table XXIII. Rural Libraries — Continued. 



County. 


Where Established. 


When 
Estab- 
lished. 


Total 
Originals. 


Supple- 
mental. 


Durham — (con.) 


No. 9, Durham . ._.. 


1908 
1908 




N 


No. 3, Patterson 

Total . 














4 






No. 4— 6 . ._ 


1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1"908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 




Edgecombe. . . 








No. 2 — 5 








No. 1 — 10.- . . . 








No. 1— 9 . . 








No. 3— 3 . _ _ 




1 




No. 2—11 

No. 4 — 1.. .- ... .. .. 














Hartsell Mill 








No. 3— 7* - - 








No. 2 — 4*. _ ........ .. 




1 




No. 1 — 12*.- . 




1 




No. 2 — 10* ....... 




1 




No. 4— 5 . .. 








No. 3— 7 

No. 1, Stony Creek. . . . 








1 




No. 1 — 4 - . 








No. 3—10* 




1 




No. 1 — 5* - ..... 






• 


Total - . . - ... 








12 


9 




No. 1, Kernersville 


1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 




Forsyth 








No. 1 , Middle Fork ..... 




■ 




No. 3, Old Town 








No. 2, Kernersville.- . 








No. 4, Kernersville 








No. 2, Salem Chapel.. _-. . 








No. 2, Vienna ... . . . 








No. 4 Broadway -i . _ 








Total -- 








8 






No. 1, Franklinton (col.) 

No. 4, Dallas . . 


1909 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 




Franklin 


1 




Gaston . 








No. 2, Dallas..- . .. . . 




1 




No. 10, Dallas. . . . 






No. 9, Dallas 




1 



*Supplemental only. 



Report of Hukal Libkaeies, 1908-'10. 



275 



Table XXIII. Rural Libraries — Continued. 



County. 
Gaston— (co?i.) 

Gates 

Granville 



<;reene. . 



<;UILFORD_ 



H A LI FAX - 



Where Established. 



No. 3.. Dallas 

No. 7, Cherryville 

Total 

No. 4, Gatesville 

No. 6, Hunter's Mill- 
Total 

No. 2, Sassafras 1 

No. 7, Oak Hill 

No. 6, Fishing Creek. 
No. 2, Fishing Creek. 

No. 2, Tally Ho 

No. 2, Salem 

Total 

No. 1, Olds 

No. 1, Jason 

No. 1, Shine 

No. 3, Bullhead 

No. 2, Ormonds 

Total 

No. 7, Greene 

No. 3, Monroe 

No. 4, Clay 

No. 6, High Point--. 
No. 2, Rock Creek-.. 
No. 4, Center Grove - 

No. 3, Madison* 

Total 

No. 3, Roseneath 

No. 1, Roseneath 

Brinkley ville 

No. 5, Brinkleyville- 

No. 3, Palmyra 

No. 2, Halifax 

No. 1, Brinkley ville- 

No. 6, Brinkley ville- 

Total 



When 

Estab- 
lished. 



Total 



I Orisinal.s. mental 



1909 
1909 



1910 
1910 



1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 



1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1910 



1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1910 



1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 



Supple- 



*Suppleraental only. 



276 



Repoet of Rural, Libkaries^ 1908-'10. 



Table XXIII. Rural Libraries — Continued. 



County. 



Harnett. 



Henderson. 



Hertford _ 



Hyde 

Iredell 



Jackson. 



Where Established. 



No. 1, Duke 

No. 1, Averasboro 

No. 2, Grove 

Total 

No. 8, Green River 

No. 8, Hendersonville. 

Total- 

No. 6, Winton 

No. 9, St. Johns 

No. 1, St. Johns 

No. 1, Murfreesboro... 
No. 2, Winton 

Total 

No. 3, Fairfield 

No. 7, Fallston 

No. 5, ChaiHibersburg- 

No. 4, FalLston 

No. 2, Union Grove 

No. 6, Union Grove 

No. 3, Statesville 

No. 1, Davidson 

No. 2, Turnersburg 

No. 1, Turnersburg 

No. 3, Olin 

N-o. 5, Olin 

No. 3, Fallston 

No. 4, Betljany 

No. 4, Union Grove 

No. 2, New Hope 

No. 3, Barringer 

No. 4, Shiloh.. - 

No. 6, Shiloh... 

No. 7, Shiloh 

Total 

No. 3, River T — 

No. 5, Cullowhee 

No. 2, Caney Fork 

No. 2, Savannah 

Total - 



When 
Estab- 
lished. 



1909 
1909 
1910 



1908 
1908 



1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 



1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 



1908 
1908 
1910 
1910 



Total 
Originals. 



Supple- 
mental. 





1 










3 


1 














2 




























5 




1 




















































































19 










. . 














4 





Report of Rural, Libraries^ 1908-'10. 



277 



Table XXIII. Rural Librakies — Continued. 



County. 


Where EstabUshed. 


When 
Estab- 
lished. 


Total Supple- 
Originals, mental. 


Johnston 


No. 8, Ingram . '. . 


1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 








No. 10, Boou Hill , 








No. 3, Meadow -. _ 








No. 4, Meadow. _ _ _ _ 








No. 6, Wilders.. 








No. 2, Cleveland .. _^_ 








Total 












6 






No. 6, Pollocksville . ... _ 


1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 




Jones _ - - . _ 








No. 1, Chinquepin. 








No. 2, White Oak... 








No. 1, White Oak (col.) . 








No. 2, Chinquepin 








No. 2, Trenton __. . .. 








No. 3, Tuckahoe.. .. . . 








Total . . . . 








7 






No. 2, Pocket. 


1909 
1909 
1910 




Lee - - - 








No. 1, Jonesboro. . 








No. 7, Pocket 








Total.. . . 








3 






No. 2, Sand Hill 


1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 




Lenoir . . . 








No. 3, Neuse.. 








No. 5, Woodington 








No. 1, Trent . .. 


• 






LaGrange .. . _ ._ 




1 




Total. . - 








5 


1 




No. 5, Catawba Springs .. 


1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 




Lincoln ._ . 








No. 11, Catawba Springs _. 








No. 4, Lincolnton. 








No. 8, Howards. 








No. 10, Howards ... . 








No. 3, North Brook ... 








No. 4, North Brook... . . 








Total. - 












No. 9, Franklin . . 








Macon _. 


1908 
1908 




1 




No. 6, Franklin . . 






. 


No. 1, Sugar Fork. . 


1908 
1908 








No. 2, Ellijay* 




1 



*Supplemental only. 



278 



Report of Rukal Librakies, 1908-'10. 



Table XXIII. Rukal. Libraries — Continued. 



County. 



Where Established. 



Macon — {con.) 



Madison. 



Martin. 



McDowell. 



Mecklenburg . 



Mitchell. 



Montgomery . 



No. 1, Cartoogechee* 
No. 4, Mill Shoals... 

No. 1, Franklin 

No. 4, Highlands 

No. 1 , Co wee 

No. 1, Mill Shoal 

Total 

No. 3— 1 

No. 2—11 

Total 

No. 10, Williamston 
No. 21, Robersonville 
No. 17, Cross Roads 
No. 31, Goose Nest 
No. 18, Bear Grass 
No. 16, Cross Roads 
No. 5, Williamston (col.) 

Total 

No. 1, Broad River 

No. 8, Marion 

No. 3, Marion 

Total 

No. 4, Malloys Creek 
No. 5, Crab Orchard 
No. 2, Crab Orchard 
No. 1, Clear Creek 
No. 4, Clear Creek 
No. 4, Lemley 
No. 2, Berry hill 
No. 1, Paw Creek 

Total 

No. 6, Poplar 
No. 3, Toe River 
No. 1, .\ltamont 

Total 
No. 3 Mount Gilead 



When 
Estab- 
lished. 



1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 



1908 
1910 



Total I Supple- 
Originals. ; mental. 




I.. 




1 






i 


1 


; 8 3 














J 2 




i 




I 












i 
















7 




1 




i 








[ 




1 3 




1 










1 






^ 


















8 


1 


















3 






1 







♦Supplemental only. 



■ Report of Eukal Libeakies^ 1908-'10. 



279 



Table XXIII. Rokal Libraries — Continued. 



County. 



Moore . 



Nabh. 



Where Established. 



Northampton' . 



Onslow 



Orange. 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



4, Mineral Springs -- 

6, Sand Hill : 

3; Mineral Springs.. 

1, Bensalem* 

1, Sand Hill (col.).. 

6, Carthage 

8, Greenwood 

4, Deep River 

1, Greenwood 

6, Mineral Springs.. 
Total... ■ 

6, Mannings 

3, .Jackson 

4, Mannings 

3, North Whitakers. 

4, Ferrells.i 

1 , Nashville 

Total 

27, AVicconee 

44, Roanoke 

Total 

1, Stump Sound.. . 
7, Swansboro 

1, Jacksonville 

2, Stump Sound.. 
9, Stump Sound-.- 

12, Stump Sound... 

10, Stump Sound... 

Total 

2, Cedar Grove 

3, Bingham 

7, Cheeks 

5, Hillsboro . 

2, Hillsboro 

3, Chapel Hill 

7, Chapel Hill* 



When 
Estab- 
lished. 



1908 
1908 
1908 

1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 



1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 



1909 
1909 



1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 



1908 
1908 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 



Total 
Originals. 



Supple- 
mental. 



*Supplemental only. 



280 



Report of Rural Libraries, 1908-'10. 



Table XXIII. Rural Libraries — Continued. 



County. 


Where Established. 


When 
Estab- 
lished. 


Total 
Originals. 


Supple- 
mental. 


Orange — (,con.) 


No. 3, Hillsboro* . ....... 


1910 
1910 


■ , 


No. 6, Bingham* 




1 




Total - - 








9 


3 




No. 4, Nixonton 


1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 




Pasquotank - . 








No. 3, Mount Herman. 




1 




No. 3, Mount Herman (col.) 

No. 3 Nixonton (col.) . 














No. 2, Salem (col.) _ 








Total - - - 






5 


1 




No 4 Union . . . _ . . - 


1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1910 
1910 
1910 




Pender 








No. 2, Long Creek _. ._ -. _ 








No. 1, Long Creek. . 









No. 6, Union 








No 2, Columbia .. 






No. 5, Columbia _- . 








No 1 Canetuck . _ 








No 5 Long Creek. . . _ _ . 




1 




No 1, Grady .- .. 








No n Bureaw 


' 






No 4 Topsail 


] 




Total ._--- -.- 


: 




11 ! 1 




No. 4, Hertford 


1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 




Perquimans 






No 1 New Hooe.. _ 








No. 2. Bethel - 








No. 3, Bethel- . 


. 






No 2 Hertford 








No. 3. Hertford . ._ 








Total 








6 






No 3 Cunningham . . _ _ . 


1908 
1908 
1909 




Person 








No. 5, Roxboro . . - - 








No 4 Flat River 








Total -. .. - 








3 




No 6, Chicod .. 


1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 






Pitt 








No 12, Swift Creek 








No 7 Greenville 








No. 6, Carolina 







♦Supplemental only. 



Report of Rural Libraries^ 1908-'10. 



281 



Table XXIII. Rural Libraries — Continued. 



County. 


Where Established. 


When 
Estab- 
lished 


Total 
Originals. 


Supple- 
mental. 


Pitt — (con.) 


No. 10, Chicod.. . .- 


1908 
1908 






No. 5, Greenville 

Total - -.- - 














6 






No. 2, Coleridge - - 


1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 




Randolph 


_ 






No. 3, Coleridge 

No. 1, New Hope - - 














No. 4, New Market 








No. 1 , Tabernacle 

No. 1, Providence* . 

No. 2, New Market- - . -- 










1 










No. 1, Liberty - 








No. 1, Trinity _ - - - 




1 




No. 2, Trinity . - 








Total 








10 


2 




No. 6, Mineral Springs - . - 


1909 
1909 
1909 




Richmond . 








No. 2, Beaver Dam . 








No. 4, Steeles 

Total - - - -- 














3 






No. 3, Britts - .- - - -- 


1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 




Robeson _. 








No. 2, Lumberton 

No. 1, Smiths 

No. 2, Lumberton (col.) -. - 




















No. 4, Harrellsville 

No. 3, Maxton . 














No. 2, Harrellsville 

No. 5, Lumberton .-_ 

Total 

No. 4, Ruffin- -. 

No. 1 New Bethel -. . . 


1909 
1909 

1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 




















8 




Rockingham.. . .. 














No. 5, Simpsonville 

No. 1, Ruffln 

No. 5, New Bethel- .. 




















No. 5, Wentworth 

No. 7, Wentworth 

No. 3, Reidsville* - 

Total 
















1 











7 


1 



*Supplemental only. 



282 



Report of Rukal Libraries^ 1908-'10. 



Table XXIII. Rural Libbakies — Continued. 



County. 



Rowan - 



Rutherford 



Sampson 



SCOTLAND-- 



Stanly _ 
Stokes, 



No, 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
j No. 
! No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
j No. 
I No. 
I No. 

No. 

No. 
}"no. 
i No. 
I No. 
I No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



Where E.stablished. 


t 

1 When 
1 Estab- 
1 lished. 

, 1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 


^ Total 
Originals. 


Supple- 
mental. 


1 , Steele ... 






2, Franklin- ... . .... 






5, Litaker . . _ 






2, Litaker. .. 






2, Mount Ulla 

2, China Grove.. 


[ 




9, Atwell*. .. 




1 






Total , _ . _ . 


6 


1 




1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 




7 — 3 .. . . 






5 — 3 






6 — 9 .- 






3 — 2 - - - . - . 






10 — 7 . ,-. 






7 — 4 . - ... 






5 — 1.. - 






6 — 8 












Total - - ... - -- 


8 






1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
. 1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 




6, Little Coharie _ _ _ 






4 , Franklin ^ _. 






2, McDaniels. _ .... 






2, Taylor's Bridge. .. 






3 South Clinton 






9, Mingo . 






2, Little Coharie .. 






1 Newton Grove 






1 McDaniels 






4 Tavlor's Bridge 






10, Mingo 






4 Mingo 












Total 


12 






1 
1910 i 

1910 




3 , Laurel Hill . 






4, Spring Hill 










Total 


2 






1909 

1908 
1909 
1909 




1, Big Lick.. .. - 


1 






2, Daiiburv .. 




8 Sauratown 




5. Beaver Island- - . 







*Supplemental only. 



Report of Rural Libraries, lOOS-'lO. 



•2S:] 



Table XXIII. Rural Liukaries — Continued. 




Stokes — (con.). 



MJKRY- 



Transylvania 



Union. 



Vance. 



No. 9, Sauratown 

No. 6, Peter.'i Creek. . 

No. 11, Yadkin 

No. 4, Quaker Oap.- 

Total . 

No. 5, >Iount Airy-.- 
No. 3, Pilot Mountaiiu 

No. 1, Mount Airy 

No. 2, Marsh 

No. 1, Westfleld 

No. 6, Dobson 

No. 1, St. Creek 

No. 5, St. Creek 

Total 

No. 1, Brevard 

No. 2, Dunn's Rock__ 

No. 3, Brevard 

No. 5, Hogback 

No. 4, Little River.. _ 

No. 3, Hogback 

No. 2. Cathey's Creek _ 

No. 1, Estatoe 

No. 3, Little River. __ 

Total . 

No. 1, Marsh ville 

No. 5, Jackson 

No. 1, Goose Creek 

No. 4, Lanes Creek — 

No. 4, Jackson 

No. 6, Lanes Creek 

No. 7, Sandy Ridge. _. 
No. 6, Buford 

Total 

No. 4, Kittrell 

No. 6—1 . _ . 

Total. - 



1910 
1910 
I'.IIO 
1910 



1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 



1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 



1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 



1909 
1910 



Total ; Supple- 
OriKiiuiLs. I mental. 



284 



Report of Rural Libraries^ 1908-'10. 



Table XXIII. Rural Libraries — Continued. 



County. 



Wake No. 4, Little River* . 

No. 6, White Oak*. 



Where Established; 



No. 1, Gary* 

No. 8, Swift Creek*.. - 

No. 6, Marks Creek 

No. 3, Marks Creek 

No. 2, Wake Forest 

No. 3, Buckhorn 

No. 1, Caiy 

No. 2, Cedar Fork 

No. 8, Swift Creek 

No. 4, Little River... 

No. 2, St. Marys 

No. 6, White Oak 

No. 3, Holly Springs.. 
Total 

Warren Warrenton School 

Wise* 

No. 2, Fork Township. 
Total 

Washington No. 1, Plj^mouth 

No. 3, Lees (col.) 



Watauga. 



Wayne- 



WlLKES. 



Roper* 

No. 2, Plymouth*.-. 
No. 2, Scuppernong*. 
Plymouth* 

Total 

No. 4, Beaver Dam__ 

No. 9, Boone 

No. 1, Blue Ridge... 
No. 1, Boone 

Total 

No. 7, Grantham 

No. 6, Nahunta 

Total 

No. 8, Edwards* 

No. 1, Edwards* 



When 
Estab- 
lished. 



1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 



1909 
1909 
1910 



1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 



1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 



1908 
1908 



1908 
1908 



Total Supple- 
Originals, i mental. 





1 








1 




















1 






11 


9 








1 










2 


1 












1 








1 




1 






6 


3 






















4 
















2 





♦Supplemental only. 



Report of Rukal Libraries^ 1908-'10. 



285 



Table XXIII. Rural Libraries — Continued. 



County. 



Where Established. 



Wilkes — (con.) ! No. 5, Edwards*. 

No. 1, Union* 



No. 2, Boomer* 

No. 6, Mulberry* 

No. 4, Lovelace* 

No. 2, Mulberry* 

No. 3, Elk* 

No. 2, Mulberry* 

No. 4, Lewis Creek 

No. 6, Reddies River 

No. 5, Somers 

No. 8, Mulberry 

No. 1, Lovelace 

No. 8, Union 

No. 7, Union 

No. 3, Walnut Grove 

No. 5, Rock Creek 

No. 5, Brushy Mountain. 

No. 7, Mulberry 

No. 3, Lovelace 

No. 4, Walnut Cove 

No. 3, Wilkesboro 

No. 5, Lewis Fork 

No. 3, Brushy Mountain- 
No. 1, Trap Hill (col.)... 

No. 2, Trap Hill 

No. 1, Brushy Mountain- 
No. 8, Reddies River 

No. 4, Brushy Mountain- 
No. 3, New Castle 

No. 1, Beaver Creek 

No. 6, Union 

No. 4, Moravian Falls 

No. 9, Reddies River 

No. 4, Elk 

No. 1, Somers 

No. 3, Reddies River 



When 
Estab- 
lished. 



1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 



Total 
Originals. 


Supple- 
mental. 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 
















1 














































. 


























1 




1 































♦Supplemental only. 



286 



IvKPORT OF Rural Libraries^ 1908-'10. 



Table XXIII. Rural Libraries — Continued. 



County. 


Where Established. 


When 

Estab- 
lished. 


Total 
Originals. 


Supple- 
mental. 


Wilkes — icon.) 


No. 1 , New Castle (col.) 

No. 7, Reddies River 

No. 3, Wilkesboro (col.) 

No. 9, Edwards 

No. 5, Lovelace 

No. 7, Walnut Grove 

No. 2, Somers 

No. 2, Antioch . _ 


1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 






















1 




























No. 4, Job's Cabin 

No. 7, Job's Cabin 

No. 5, Mulberry - 

No. 4, Mulberry 

No. 5, Walnut Grove -. 
































No. 2, Walnut Grove. - 








No 3 North Wilkesboro 








No. 6, Mulberry 

Total 














45 12 




No. 2, Old Fields 

No. 6, Old Fields 

No. 2, Springfield , — 

No 7 Springfield . - 


1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 








1 

1 






\ 






! 
- -.1- - - - 




No. 4. Gardners 








No. 2, Toisnot 

No. 5, Toisnot . 

No 6 Toisnot - - - 
















Total __. . _ . 


1 




8 2 




No. 6, Liberty 

No 5 Buck Shoals 


1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 




V \DK1N 






" ' " 




No. 6, Buck Shoals ^ 

No. 7, Fall Creek 

No 1 Fall Creek 


















No 6 Boonville 1909 
















Total - _ . . . ^ _ _ 


6 






No. 2, Jack's Creek 

! Grand totals • _- 


1909 




Yancey l. 


1 






528 


76 











PART 111 



REPORT OF STATE INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS, 1908-'09. 

REPORT OF STATE INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS, 1909-'10. 

REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF TEACHER-TRAINING. 

REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF RURAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

REPORT OF AGENT IN AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION. 

REPORT OF COLORED NORMAL SCHOOLS, 1908-'09 AND 1909-'10. 

REPORT OF SLATER FUND. 

REPORT OF PEABODY FUND. 

CIRCULAR-LETTERS OF STATE SUPERINTENDENT. 

DECISIONS OF STATE SUPERINTENDENT. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



STATE INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS 



NORTH CAROLINA 



FOR THE 



SCHOLASTIC YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1909 



INCLUDING A 



REPORT OF THE TOWN AND VILLAGE HIGH SCHOOLS 



BY 

N. W. WALKER 

PROFESSOR OF SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH 
CAROLINA AND STATE INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS 



Part III— 1 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 



Chapel Hill, N. C, November 20, 1909. 

Honorable J. Y. Joynek, 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Dear Sir : — I have the honor to submit herewith my Second Annual Report 
of the Public High Schools, established under an act of the Legislature of 
1907, for the scholastic year ending June 30, 1909. 

I have included also, in accordance vrith your instructions, such a report of 
the town and village high schools as could be made from the reports sent in 
to your office by the principals of these schools. 

Very truly yours, N. W. WALKER, 

State Inspector of Public High Schools. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Letter of Transmittal. 
Comments and Suggestions. 

New Schools Established, and Schools Discontinued or Moved. 

Elementary School Operated in Connection with High School. 

High-school Instruction in Two-teacher Schools. 

Students in Country Schools Pursuing High-school Studies. 

Boarding Students and Teachers Enrolled. 
Extracts from Principals' Reports. 
Town and Village High Schools. 
Summaries of Tables I, II, III, IV. 
Table I — Public High Schools. 

Schools. 

Princiiials. 

Enrollment. 

Attendance. 
Table II — Public High Schools. 

Studies Pursued. 

Students Pursuing the Different Branches. 
Table III — Public High Schools. 

Financial Report — Receipts and Expenditures. 
Table IV — Town and Village High Schools. 

Schools Reporting. 

Principals. 

Enrollment. 

Attendance. 
Table V — Town and Village High Schools. 

Studies Pursued. 

Students Pursuing the Different Branches. 




Rural Public High School, Crp^edmoor, Granville County^ N. C. 




ItiRAL ruri.ic High School, Jamestown, Guilford County, N. C. 



REPORT OF THE STATE INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC HIGH 

SCHOOLS, 1908-1909. 



COMMENTS AND SUGGESTIONS. 

Enrollment and Attendance. — The first year the public high schools were 
opened (1907-1908) there were 145 schools in operation, and they enrolled 
3,949 students and made an average daily attendance of 2,963. The second 
year (1908-1909), which is covered by this report, there were 160 schools in 
operation, and they enrolled 5,282 students and made an average daily attend- 
ance of 3,787. The increase in attendance over the preceding year was 34 per 
cent. There were enrolled 1,563 boarding students* and .303 public-school 
teachers. There were seven schools that enrolled 30 or more boarding pupils, 
ranging in number as follows : 61, 55, 50, 49, 34, 31, 30. Twenty-three schools 
enrolled 20 or more boarding students. These facts will give some idea of how 
the public high schools are beginning to make their influence felt even at this 
early stage of their development. For the year 1909-1910 there are 175 public 
high schools in operation, and a conservative estimate, based upon the pre- 
liminary reports, places the enrollment for the current year at about 7,000. 

Our Chief Problem, Expansion.— These figures would seem to indicate that 
our chief problem in connection with the public high schools is how to make 
adequate provision for the enlargement and increase of material equipment 
and teaching force, in order that the schools may meet the demands that are 
going to be made upon them. More teachers must be provided, larger school 
buildings erected, dormitories and mess-halls built, and modern furnishings 
added. All this resolves itself into a question of greater revenue for the high 
school. In order to meet this problem so as to build and equip the type of 
high school the immediate future will demand, it is going to be necessary to 
increase the territory from which the high school derives its revenue by 
direct taxation. As the high school is a county institution, the county ought 
to be made the basis of its support. As it seems best to postpone a detailed 
discussion of these matters until a year hence, I shall have more to say along 
this line and some definite suggestions to offer in my next annual report. 

Building Activity. — During the past eighteen months twelve handsome new 
brick buildings have been erected for the accommodation of public high schools 
(and the elementary schools in connection with them) at a total aggregate 
cost of $92,300. The total value of the school property of these twelve schools 
is $111,000. There have been four good wooden buildings erected during this 
period at a cost of $9,100. The total value of the school propex'ty of these 
four schools is $12,000. This gives a total of sixteen buildings in eighteen 
months, costing $101,400, and a total property value for the sixteen schools 
of $123,000. This summary does not take into account the numerous cheaper 
wooden buildings, ranging in cost from $500 to $1,250. There are fifteen other 
public high schools housed in good brick buildings, with a total property value 
of $119,300. These buildings were erected for the most part before the public 
high schools were organized or during the first year of their operation. 



*This means students from outside the local school district, many of whom were not actual 
boarders. Quite a number furnished their own conveyance and drove from home every morn- 
ing, many from as far as seven miles. 



6 Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 

Public High-school Funds. — The following table shows the amount raised 
for high-school instruction during the first two years and the sources from 
which these funds were derived : 



Sources. 


1907-'08. 


1908-'09. 


Local tax . . . 


S 27.470.48 
13,187.04 
21,943.66 
40,785.00 


$ 34,551.89 


Private donation _. _ 


9,316.76 


County apportionment _ _ . 


27,903.81 


State apportionment . .. .. 


45,369.99 


Balance on liand 


6,175.71 










Total 


$ 103,386.18 


S 123,318.16 









Significant Facts. — The public high schools have done much more than 
merely offer high-school training to the thousands of high-school students they 
have enrolled : they have exerted an upward pull upon the elementary schools 
about tiiem. Evidence of this fact is to be found in the readiness with which 
progressive communities are voting taxes upon themselves for the support of 
the high schools and of the elementary schools in connection with them ; in 
the voting of bonds for better and more modern buildings ; in the consolidation 
of districts in order to secure sufficient financial support to put a central 
school upon a substantial basis and thus get State aid for the high school ; in 
a growing dissatisfaction with the ineflicient teacher, and in an increased 
willingness to pay better salaries for better teachers and longer school terms. 
Again, these schools are extending their influence more widely as they become 
better known. 

Counties Without High Schools. — For the current year (1909-1910) there 
are only nine counties without public high schools. These coimties are: 
Brunswick, Chowan, Dare. New Hanover, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Stanly. 
Tyrrell, and Yancey. 

NEW SCHOOLS ESTABLISHED AND SCHOOLS 
DISCONTINUED OR MOVED. 

Schools Discontinued or Moved, 1908-'09. 

Cabarrus Georgeville. 

Caldwell Lenoir. 

Cherokee Belleview (moved to Murphy). 

Craven New Bern (moved to Vanceboro). 

Edgecombe Battleboro (moved to Tarboro). 

Granville Howard (moved to Creedmoor). 

Greene Snow Hill. 

Hyde Sladesville. 

.Tones Trenton (moved to Pollocksville) . 

McDowell Marion. 

Randolph Ramseur (moved to Libei-ty). 

Stanly Albemarle. 

Transylvania Selica (moved to Rosman). 

Union Mt. Prospect (moved to Unionville) . 

Wayne Goldsboro (moved to Pikeville). 

Wilkes Mt. Pleasant (moved to Ronda) . 

Wilson Elm City. 

Yancey Elk Shoal. 



Public HiCrii Schools, 1908-1901). 7 

New Schools, 1908-'09. 

Alamance Sylvan. 

Alexander Stony Point. 

Cherokee Murphy ( moved from Bellevlew ) . 

Ci'aven Vanceboro ( moved from New Bern ) . 

Edgecombe Tarboro (moved .from Battleboro). 

Edgecombe-Nash Whitakers. 

Gates Sunbury. 

Granville Creedmoor (moved from Howard) . 

Guilford Monticello. 

Hertford Wluton. 

Jones PoUocksville (moved from Trenton) . 

Northampton Severn. 

Orange Chapel Hill. 

Polk Columbus. 

Randolph Trinity. 

do Liberty (moved from Ramseur ) . 

Sampson Newton Grove. 

Surry Elkin. 

Transylvania Rosman ( moved from Selica ) . 

Union Unionville (moved from Mt. Prospect) . 

Wayne Pikeville (moved from Goldsboro). 

Wilkes Ronda (moved from Mt. Pleasant). 

Schools Discontinued, 1909-'10. 

Beaufort Washington. 

Henderson Fletcher. 

New Schools Established, 1909-'10. 

Alexander Taylorsville. 

Burke Glen Alpine. 

Caswell Providence. 

Clay Hayesville. 

Durham Bahama. 

Gates Reyuoldson. 

Gi'aham Andrews.* 

Greene Snow Hill. 

Hyde Sladesville. 

Macon Cowee. 

Moore Carthage. 

Orange Hillsboro. 

Person Bushy Fork. 

Stokes King. 

do Pinnacle. 

do Walnut Cove. 

Surry Rockf ord. 

Yadkin Boonville. 



♦There is no public high school in Graham County; but the county is allowed, under a 
special act of the Legislature, to co-operate with Cherokee County in- maintaining a joint pub- 
lic high school at Andrews. 



8 Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 

Tlie number of public bigh schools established the first year (1907-'08) 
was 156. t 

The second year (1908-'09), 18 of these schools were discontinued or moved 
to other points, and 22 new schools established, making a net gain of four 
schools over the first year. Thus there were 160 public high schools in oper- 
ation the second year (1908-'09). 

The third year (1909-'10), 2 schools were discontinued, and 17 new schools 
were established, making 175 schools in operation for the year 1909-'10. 

THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL OPERATED IN CONNECTION WITH THE 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

The public high school has a vital organic relation to the public elementary 
school below it, and this relationship must never be lost sight of. If either 
the public high school or the elementary school is ever to be made really effi- 
cient, the other must be made I'easonably so. It is necessaiy, then, that a little 
more attention be paid to the elementary school conducted in connection with 
the public high school. Although both schools may at present be conducted in 
the same building, they are legally constituted two separate and distinct 
schools. The public high school is held up to requirements that the elementary 
school may disregard with impunity. The one belongs to the county and is 
open, free of tuition, to pupils of high-school age residing in all parts of the 
county ; the other is purely local, drawing its patronage only from the con- 
tiguous territory. The one must be reasonably well equipped, must follow 
systematic courses of instruction, and must have competent instructors ; the 
other, too frequently, is a law unto itself in these respects. The public high 
school has at its head a principal licensed by the State, who also exercises 
supervisory and disciplinary functions over the elementary school, but he has 
no voice in the selection of the teachers whose work he is to supervise, nor has 
the County Board of Education or the State. 

Now, it is necessary that the elementary schools which are operated in con- 
nection with the public high schools, in the same building and under the same 
principal, shall be well equipped, well organized, and well taught. The merely 
nominal requirement, that the elementary school shall be well provided for. 
is practically inoperative. 

Much can be done to improve these elementary schools by establishing for 
them some standard of teaching efliciency. Every teacher in one of these 
schools ought to be required at least to hold the first-grade county certificate, 
and a much better requirement would be that every such teacher should hold 
the five-year State certificate. To exact such a requirement at once would 
seem, in many cases, to impose an undue hardship; nevertheless, it would 
certainly improve the instruction in the elementary grades, which would mean 
decided improvement in the high school as well. And along with this require- 
ment should come minimum salary and minimum term regulations. Not a few 
communities are at present crippling their elementary schools in order to raise 
the required funds for the high schools. This should not be allowed. The high 
school and the elementary school must be improved together. 



fEleven of these school.s did not open the first year. Three of these eleven— Battleboro, 
Snow Hill, and Selica— were not ready to open at the beginning of the second year, and were 
discontinued in order that the funds might be used elsewhere. 



Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 9 

HIGH-SCHOOL INSTRUCTION IN TWO-TEACHER SCHOOLS. 

As soon as it is practicable to do so, it will be to the best interest of both 
the public high schools and the elementary schools to discontinue the teaching 
of high-school branches in the two-teacher country schools. There are per- 
haps 800 or more of these two-teacher schools in which some high-school 
instruction is given. I have taken occasion to look into the work of these 
schools as closely and as carefully as time would permit, and I am frank to 
say that much of the high-school instruction offered is but little better than 
none at all. 

Two teachers who have to instruct 65 or more pupils in all the branches of 
the first seven grades ought not to attempt to give insti-uction in the high- 
school branches. To do so is, in most cases, a mere waste of time. It means, 
too, that the lower grades must be neglected and that the high-school instruc- 
tion must be given in a haphazard way, without any plan or system, and with- 
out adequate time for recitation periods. It too frequently happens that two 
or three advanced pupils who are pursuing one or two high-school subjects — 
say Latin and Algebra or General History — are allowed to take up one-half 
(or more in some cases) of one teacher's time, while 30 or 40 pupils in the 
elementary grades are being neglected. Again it happens that the recitation 
periods for the high-school classes are not more than ten minutes in length, 
and thus the high-school pupils ax'e neglected ; or, sometimes, the teacher has 
a "favorite study" which is overstressed to the neglect of all other subjects. 
Such aimless, haphazard work ought not to be permitted ; and now that the 
public high school is within comparatively easy reach of all pupils of high- 
school grade, there is no valid reason why such pupils should not be taken 
out of the local two-teacher school and sent on to the public high school. 

Of course, local community pride will in many cases revolt against this idea, 
and may for a time operate against the plan proposed ; but as soon as the gen- 
eral public shall become actually sensible of the fact that the high school is 
not merely a local school, but that it is a county institution^ this objection will 
no longer exist. The county superintendent can do much to remedy the situa- 
tion discussed above by encouraging the older pupils to go on to the public 
high school, and many of them are exerting their influence in this direction 
with good results. But there are not a few cases in which the pride of the 
teacher has counteracted the influence of the superintendent and kept the 
pupils at home in the two-teacher school by assuring parents that just as good 
advantages are offered in the local school as are offered in the high school. 
This situation can be met most effectually by requiring every teacher in the 
public schools who teaches high-school subjects to hold a State certificate. 

If the public schools having three or more teachers continue to give high- 
school instruction, they ought to be required to employ for this work regularly 
licensed high-school teachers, to organize their work upon a respectable basis, 
allowing adequate time for recitation periods, and to follow systematic courses 
of instruction. Otherwise, such schools will operate against any compact and 
effective organization of the public high-school work. 

I am giving herewith the number of students reported by the county super- 
intendents as pursuing high-school branches in the various counties of the 
State. Following the name of each county is the total number of high-school 



10 Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 

pupils reported by the county superintendent ; and following that is given, in 
parenthesis, the total number of students in the public high schools of the 
county as reported by the public high-school principals. 

STUDENTS IN THE COUNTRY SCHOOLS PURSUING HIGH-SCHOOL 

STUDIES. 

Alamance,* 120 (85) ; Alexander, 334 (19) ; Alleghany, 20 (53) ; Anson, ... 
(62) ; Ashe, 49 (44) ; Beaufort, 76 (65) ; Bertie, 77 (66) ; Bladen, 214 (61) ; 
Brunswick, 106 (...); Buncombe, 298 (102) ; Burke, ... (...); Cabarrus, 35 
(16) ; Caldwell, ... (15) ; Camden, 27 (24) ; Carteret, 65 (31) ; Caswell, ... 
(...); Catawba, 161 (41); Chatham, 111 (80) ; Cherokee, 56 (87) ; Chowan. 
2 ( . . ) ; Clay, ... (...); Cleveland, 95 (47) ; Columbus, 134 (72) ; Craven, 19 
(50) ; Cumberland, . . . (81) ; Currituck, 31 (18) ; Dare, ... (...); Davidson, 
30 (33) ; Davie, 66 (52) ; Duplin, . . . (85) ; Durham, 271 (47) ; Edgecombe, 15 
(127) ; Forsyth, 308 (168) ; Franklin, 18 (78) ; Gaston, 166 (114) ; Gates, 75 
(24); Graham, ... (...); Granville, 89 (95); Greene, 21 (...); Guilford. 
212 (147) ; Halifax, 18 (55) ; Harnett, ... (31) ; Haywood, 62 (85) ; Hender- 
son, ... (95) ; Hertford, 53 (57) ; Hyde, ... (24) ; Iredell, 184 (100) ; Jack- 
son, 30 (19) ; Johnston, 134 (86) ; Jones, ... (37) ; Lee, 39 (41) ; Lenoir, ... 
(35); Lincoln, 106 (62); Macon, ... (66); Madison, 37 (81); Martin, 125 
(103); Mecklenburg, ... (109); McDowell, ... (45); Mitchell, ... (30); 
Montgomery, ... (37); Moore, 85 (22); Nash, ... (61); New Hanover, 9 
(...); Northampton, 177 (73) ; Onslow, 1 (22) ; Orange, 135 (37) ; Pamlico, 
24 (31) ; Pasquotank, 32 (...); Pender, 75 (75) ; Perquimans, 6 (...); Per- 
son, 17 (23) ; Pitt, 232 (74) ; Polk, 18 (19) ; Randolph, 156 (90) ; Richmond, 
90 (55); Robeson, 412 (129); Rockingham, ... (104); Rowan, 147 (91); 
Rutherford, 106 (33); Sampson, 165 (58); Scotland, ... (29); Stanly, ... 
(...); Stokes, 8 (...); Surry, ... (155) ; Swain, 21 (67) ; Transylvania, 38 
(26) ; Tyrrell, ... (...); Union, 285 (70) ; Vance, 168 (55) ; Wake, 344 (228) ; 
Warren, 55 (51); Washington, 19 (47); Watauga, ... (14); Wayne, 293 
(78); Wilkes, 155 (80); Wilson, ... (33); Yadkin. 23 (34); Yancey, 22 
(...). 

Total, 7,407 (5,282). 

BOARDING STUDENTS AND TEACHERS ENROLLED. 

Number of schools that enx'olled public-school teachers 89 

Number of male teachers enrolled 116 

Number of female teachers enrolled 187 

Total number of teachers enrolled 303 

Number of schools that enrolled boarding pupils 144 

Nimiber of boarding pupils enrolled 1,563 

Boys 779 

Girls 784 



♦Following the name of each county is the number of students pursuing high-school 
branches as reported by the county superintendents; and following that, is given, in paren- 
thesis, the number of students in the public high school or schools of that county. 



Public PTtgii Schools, 1908-1009. 11 

Schools enrolling 50 or more 3 

Schools enrolling from 30 to 49 4 

Schools enrolling from 20 to 29 16 

Schools enrolling from 10 to 19 32 

Schools enrolling from 5 to 9 47 

Schools enrolling from 1 to 4 42 

The seven schools enrolling 30 or more boarding students are: Gary, 61; 
Huntersville, 55; Holly Springs, 50; Hendersonville, 34; Turkey Knob, 31; 
Helton, 30. 



EXTRACTS FROM PRINCIPALS' REPORTS. 

Principal Philip E. Shaw, Friendship High School, Alamance County: 
"Bought a $250 piano ; built a $250 'school barn' ; constructed an eight-room 

dormitory, and beautified the school grounds by planting flowers and giving 

the grounds a general cleaning." 

Principal J. W. Hendren, Stony Point High School, Alexander County: 
"A new four-room school building has been erected during the year, valued 
at $2,100." 

Principal A. A. Keener, Lilesville High School, Anson County: 
"New school building erected, $5,000; librai-y purchased." 



Principal L. E. Bennett, Pantego High School, Beaufort County: 
"We have a collection of 20 old and rare books ranging in age from 75 to 
269 years. We have 445 volumes in our library. And we have started a 
museum consisting of minerals, Indian stone axes, old relics of different kinds, 
stuffed animals, etc." 

Principal W. R. Smithwick, Whiteville High School, Columbus County: 
"Four recitation rooms added, and two halls, 20 patent desks, 200 chairs. 
Trees planted on the grounds." 

Principal J. W. Daniel, Bcthania High School, Forsyth County: 
"We have graded the school grounds, laid off walks, sown grass, planted 
violets and trees ; and have also enclosed the school front with a neat and 
substantial fence. This work was all done by the high-school pupils under the 
supervision of the principal. Other improvements will follow." 



Principal J. Graham Viser, Walkertoun High School, Forsyth County: 
"We have built a new high-school building this year costing about $5,000. 



Principal J. A. Pitts, Creedmoor High School, Granville County: 

"A new two-stoi"y brick building has been completed [value of building and 

grounds, $10,000], and grounds leveled and sown down in preparation for 

grass. A clubhouse is being prepared." 



12 Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 

Principal S. T. Liles, Monticello High School, Guilford County: 
"New liouse of modern design, costing when completed about $3,500, now 
being built. The new high school is attracting attention, and the enrollment 
is expected to reach 50 or 60 next year. We are compelled to have money for 
another teacher. Two teachers were enrolled, and 9 others are preparing to 
teach in the public schools." 

Principal W. H. Albright, Aurelian Springs High School, Halifax County: 
"We have piano, organ, good library, etc., Hope to build an annex to our 

present building this year and add such other improvements as are necessary. 

School has bright future." 

Principal L. R. Hoffman, Lillington High School, Harnett County: 
"This district needs a compulsory school law." 



Miss Hassie Lou Pender, Principal Hendersonville High School: 
"The front of the grounds has been terraced and sodded, and young trees 
have been planted." 

Principal E. P. Dixon, Ahoskie High School, Hertford County: 
"Marked improvement over last year, both in work and in organization. 
Voted local tax and issued bonds for new building." 



Principal J. M. Watts, Scotts High School, Iredell County: 
"Playground has been enlarged and nearly all stumps removed. Sand has 
been hauled and walks made in front of building." 



Miss Elizabeth Kelly, Principal lotla High School, Macon County: 
"Water has been brought through pipes from a spring on the mountain-side 
one mile to schoolhouse. Undergrowth and stumps cleared from campus. 
Road or driveway graded to athletic grounds. These are some of the improve- 
ments this year." 

Principal John D. Everett, Rohersonville High School, Martin County: 
"Installed new clock ; painted house ; built up yard ; raised money for 
library." 

Principal Z. H. Rose, Williamston High School: 

"We established a $50 library and selected material for the Literary Socie- 
ties. There was no library in the school before the two societies made up 
this amount." 

Principal Hoy Taylor, Biscoe High School, Montgomery County: 
"A new brick school building has been erected during the past year at a cost 
of about $5,300. Greater interest has been shown in schools than ever before, 
and prospects are good for a much more widely patronized school next year." 



Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 13. 

Principal James Hutchins, Hoffman High School, Richmond County: 
"Our school building has been equipped with patent desks, maps, globes, etc. 
The school grounds have been greatly improved. Nearly every district in the 
township in which the Hoffman High School is located has voted a local tax 
and gives us assurance of a good many high-school students next year." 



Principal Edwin D. Pusey, Roberdel High School, Richmond County: 
"Fourteen acres of ground have been acquired, and a new school building is 
in course of erection." 

Principal H. F. Pardue, Pilot Mountain High School, Surry County: 
"School building erected ; library of 125 volumes purchased ; .$75 spent on 
physical laboratory." 

Principal E. L. Geeen, Bona Vista High School, Vance County: 
"The grounds liave been improved ; trees planted ; piano bought." 



Principal C. E. Pennington, Kittrell High School, Vance County: 
"We have bought piano; secured maps costing $22; put in additional library 
books, $15 ; put up United States flag which cost $6 ; improved grounds by clear- 
ing off trees and rubbish." 

Principal F. L. Foust, Bay Leaf High School, Wake County: 
"The people are making every effort possible to build up a good school at 
Bay Leaf, and the school is in a very prosperous condition. At the close of the 
school $800 was raised for a new dormitory, and they expect to increase this to 
$2,000." 

Principal M. B. Dry, Gary High School, Wake County: 

"Rural library secured ; campus fenced, and fence painted ; school farm 
secured (during lifetime of owner) ; State flag purchased, etc. Total enroll- 
ment for school, 307 ; boarders, 77 ; counties represented, 18." 



Principal R. C. Holton, Wakelon High School, Wake County: 
"We are cultivating three acres this year — two in corn and peas and one in 
cotton. Part of the work is done by the boys; the rest is given." 



Principal A. R. Freeman, Pikeville High School, Wayne County: 
"Students coming from the country districts have made the best attendance. 
Some drive as far as seven miles." 



Principal E. G. Suttlemyke, WilkesTjoro High School, Wilkes County: 
"New building completed for next term, costing $7,000. The old building 
will be converted into a dormitory which will accommodate about 35." 



14 Public Hi«h Schools, 1908-1909. 

TOWN AND VILLAGE HIGH SCHOOLS. 

Sixty-four of these schools reported in full or in part. These 64 schools re- 
ported an enrollment of: boys, 2,275; girls, 3,132; total, 5,407. Forty-one of 
these 64 schools reported their average daily attendance ; 23 of them did not 
make such report. These 41 schools had an enrollment of: boys, 1,643; girls, 
2,210; total, 3,853; and an average daily attendance of: boys, 1,330; girls, 
1,844; total, 3,174. Assuming that the average daily attendance in the 64 
schools (23 of which did not report their attendance) was as high in propor- 
tion to the enrollment as it was in the 41 schools that did report, we find that 
these 64 schools must have made an average daily attendance of : boys, 1,841 ; 
girls, 2,613 ; total, 4,454.* 

PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— SUMMARY OF TABLE I. 
Schools: 

Number of schools established 160 

Schools reporting four-year courses 2 

Schools reporting three-year courses 52 

Schools reporting two-year courses 106 

Teachers: 

Total number of high-school teachers 236 

Number giving full time to high-school instruction 181 

Number giving part time to high-school instruction 55 

Number of male teachers 157 

Number of female teachers 79 

Number of male principals 147 

Number of female principals 13 

Enrollment: 

Total number of students enrolled 5,282 

Boys enrolled 2,418 

Girls enrolled 2,864 

Number of fourth-year students enrolled 44 

Number of third-year students enrolled 361 

Number of second -year students enrolled 1,390 

Number of first-year students enrolled 3,487 

Number of students in four-year high schools 185 

Number of students in three-year high schools 2.099 

Number of students in two-year high schools 2,998 

Attendance: 

Total average daily attendance 3,787 

Average daily attendance, boys 1,698 

Average daily attendance, girls 2,089 

PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— SUMMARY OF TABLE II. 

Number of students in 
English: 

Grammar 3,683 

Composition and rhetoric 3,117 

Literature 2,696 

•See p. 16. 



Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 15 

Mathematics: 

Advanced arithmetic 4,053 

Algebra 3,741 

Georueti-y 393 

History: 

Englisli history 2,037 

Aneieut history 1,051 

Medijeval history 452 

American history 1,059 

History of North Carolina 146 

Foreign Languages: 

Latin 3,772 

Greek 24 

French 122 

German 75 

Science: 

Physical geography 1,334 

Physics 324 

Introduction to science 1,031 

Agriculture 428 

Botany 25 

Chemistry 28 

Physiology 320 

Miscellaneous: 

Commercial geography 2 

Drawing 37 

Music 38 

Business methods 59 

PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— SUMMARY OF TABLE III.. 
Receipts: 

From local taxation $ 34,551.89 

From private donations 9,316.76 

From county apportionments 27,003.81 

From State appropriation 45,369.99 

Balance on hand from last year 6,175.71* 

Total receipts $123,318.16 

Disbursements: 

For principals' salaries 98,187.59 

For salaries of assistant teachers 11,897.64 

For fuel, janitor, and incidentals 2,900.40 

Total expenditures 112,985.63 

Balance on hand $ 10,332.53 

*Last year's report showed a balance of $11,970.19. The seeming discrepancy is due to the 
fact that outstanding vouchers, amounting to $5,794.48, had not been presented for payment 
when the county treasurers made their reports. 



16 Public High Schools, 1908-14)05>. 



TOWN AND VILLAGE HIGH SCHOOLS— SUMMARY OF TABLE IV. 

Schools: 

Number of schools reporting 64 

Schools reporting four-year courses 20 

Schools reporting three-year courses 27* 

Schools reporting two-year courses 14t 

Schools reporting one-year courses 3 

Teachers: 

Total number of high-school teachers 241 

Number giving full time to high-school instruction 198 

Number giving part time to high-school instruction 43 

Enrollment: 

Total number of students enrolled 5,407 

Boys enrolled 2,275 

Girls enrolled 3,132 

Number of fourth-year students enrolled 29G 

Number of third-year students enrolled 859 

Number of second-year students enrolled 1,521 

Number of first-year students enrolled 2,731 

Number of students enrolled in four-year schools 3,097 

Number of students enrolled in three-year schools 1,791 

Number of students enrolled in two-year schools 471 

Number of students enrolled in one-year schools 48 

Attendance: 

Total average daily attendance 4,454$ 

Average daily attendance, boys 1,841$ 

Average daily attendance, girls 2,613$ 



*New Bern and Wadesboro High Schools report 3§-year courses. 
fRockingham High School reports a 2J-year course. 
JEstimated attendance— see statement on page 14. 



Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 



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150.00 
590.00 
200.00 














•^^I'Bl'Bg 
S,IT!dlOUUcJ 


$ 625.00 
375.00 
583.31 
375.00 
300.00 
600.00 

1,350.00 
550.00 


1,000.00 
490.20 
474.99 
455.00 
500.00 
600.00 
680.00 
618.75 
485.20 
490.00 


•J'B9\ JOJ 

s?di808H mo J, 


8 750.00 
750.00 
750.00 
550.00 
500.00 
880.00 

1,523.97 

1,316.11 
200.00 

1,050.00 
500.00 
575.00 
500.00 
500.00 
849.50 
868.15 
810.00 
500.00 
500.00 


m 

.& 

I) 
Pi 


JO pug 
aou'Bi'Ba 


efi 




o 


130.00 
23.97 








I O 1 

O 1 

lO > 


99.50 

118.15 

60.00 




•juam 
-uotijoddv 


$ 250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
500.00 
500.00 
100.00 
350.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 


■5U3UI 

-uoiiioddv 
ii^iunoo 


$ 250.00 
250.00 
250.00 


250.00 
500.00 
633.40 
100.00 
350.00 




250.00 
250.00 
250.00 




•uoii'Bnoa 

8J'BAU(I 


^ I 


o 
o 

o 


250.00 
500.00 
















g 
s 

(M 


•nou'BX'BX 
■ itjoot; 


$ 250.00 

250.00 

, 250.00 

250.00 

1S2.71 


350.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 


Name of School. 


3 
a 
T 

fa 


Hawfields 


Turkey Knob 

Stonv Point -. 


Lilesville 

Morven 

Helton 


o 

C 
"a 


o 

bl 

0) 

.4-3 

a 


■< 


Mars Hill 

Bladenboro 


<i 
"> 

m 

C! 

3 
n 
ci 

P5 


Fairview 

Hominy Valley 

firanite Falls 


t4 

43 

> 

5 
>. 



P3 




•^ 

a 

3 

o 
o 


£ 

< 




Alleghany 

Alexander _ . 


c 

o a 

to ^ 
3 a 

< < 


»^ 

o 

«,- 
ci 
PC 




.2: 

t- 
d 

p: 


3 

s 


6 

O 

3 

pq 




■4 
& 

2 

c 


1 
1 

<n 

3 





3 Tart III— 3 



34 



Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 



to 

•i 

o 



n 



3 

■3 

3 

0) 

ft 
X 

W 


•pu'BH no 

90U'B['Ba; 


1 165.00 

26.52 
36.13 






CO 1— 

* 










t97.50 
249.50 




s 

CO 


•sajn^ 
-ipnadxg 

1T310X 


$ 

553.40 
541.37 




500.00 
213.08 
782.01 
609.70 
708.50 
627.00 
1.520.00 
847.50 
500.50 
500.00 
500.00 
500.00 
195.00 


■S9su9dxa 
jaqiO PU'B 

SJO^IU'Ef 

puB ianj 


I I o t~ 

I 1 -:t. CO 

1 1 CO ,-' 
1 1 -^ CM 
1 1 

I 




10.00 
9.08 

82.01 
9.70 
8.50 

27.00 


o 
o 

d 

Cvl 






•sjaqo-eax 
jaqiO 


1 1 1 o 
1 1 1 o 
111. 
1 1 1 o 

1 1 1 t^ 

1 1 1 

۩ 1 > 

1 I 














o 

o 

d 

CO 


O 1 1 
O • 1 

^J1 I 1 

CO 1 1 




S.l'EdlDUIJ<J 


$ 585.00 
1.000 00 
540.00 
450.00 
500.00 
500.00 
490.00 
204.00 
700.00 
600.00 
700.00 
600.00 
1.200.00 
637.50 
266.50 
500.00 
500 00 
500.00 
195.00 


U'B8A JOJ 

s:}di809H I'B^ox 


$ 750.00 

1,000.00 
579.92 
577.50 
500. OOj 
500.00 
500.00 
300.00 

1,500.00 
609.70 
708.50 
627.00 

1.520.00 
750.00 
750.00 
500.00 
500.00 
500.00 
500 00 


Receipts. 


•1V9X li>'^T 

JO pua 


■ 1 C<I o 

1 1 Ol lO 

1 1 t^ f. 
























■jusm 
-uoiiioddv 


$ 250.00 
500.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
100.00 
500.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 


-uonjoddv 
A'junoo 


o I ■' I 

O 1 I 1 

O 1 1 1 
lO • i 1 
Cq 1 1 1 

۩111 






100.00 
500.00 
140.00 
140.00 


255.00 
250.00 
250.00 


o 
o 

d 


1 r^ 1 1 

•uoijBuoa i t, i ! 

ai-BAiij 1 S i I 
^ 1 1 












O 
O 










"UOH'BX'BX 
' IBDOI 


$ 250.00 
252.23 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
100.00 
500.00 
219.70 
318.50 
350.00 

1.015.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
250.00 
200.00 


Name of School. 


South Mills 

Atlantic 

St. James 

Startown 

Merrv Oaks 


s 

o 


> 

'C 


Murphy 

Andrews 


c 


o 

1 


c 

O 
.a 
■a 

G 




> 
o 

Q 


o 
o 

-g 

u 

3 


Stedman 

Godwin 

Hone Mills _ _ _ 


o 

3 

CQ 

« ft 
o 

PL, 




a 

3- 
O 

O 


Camden . 

Carteret 

Catawba 

Chatham .. 






1 

o 


•1 




3 
1 
O 




3 

0) 

> 

ce 

O 




3 

.2 

a 

3 


O 

3 
..^ 

't- 

3 

o 



Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 



35 







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36 



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Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 



37 



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Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 



41 



TABLE IV.— TOWN AND VILLAGE HIGH SCHOOLS. 

ENROLLMENT, ATTENDANCE, ETC. 











uO 


Enrollment. 


Average Daily 
Attendance. 


Town or Village 

High School, 

190S-'09. 


Superintendent " 
or Principal. 


M 

= d . 

a M S 


IN umuer o 
Years in 
Course. 


jNuraoer o 
High-scho 
Teachers. 


m 

o 


to 

o 


"3 
-«^ 
o 

Eh 




f-l 

a 


"3 

•4.3 

o 


Aberdeen 


G. C. Singletary 

H A. Scott 


32 


3 


1 


17 


15 


32 






32 


3 


3 


17 


33 


50 


11 


27 


38 


Ashboro 


O. V. Woosley 

R. V. Kennedy 


32 
38 


2 
4 


2 
10 


25 
110 


30 
123 


55 
233 


16 
74 


27 
89 


43 


Asheville 


163 


Belhaven 


W. M. Hinton 


32 


1 


1 


14 


20 


34 


10 


15 


25 


Bessemer City 

Brevard. 


F F Rockette 


32 


3 


*2 


14 


19 


33 








Benjamin G. Estes .. 


28 


3 


*2 


6 


12 


18 


6 


6 


12 


Burlington 


Frank H. Curtis 


36 


4 


t5 


33 


50 


83 


30 


48 


78 


Canton 


R. D. McDowell 

No renort 


36 


4 


*4 


19 


19 


38 


17 


16 


33 


Carthage -- 

Charlotte 




H. P. Harding 


36 


4 


t9 


89 


116 


205 


83 


109 


192 


Cherry ville 

Concord 


J W Strassell 


31 


2 


U 


14 


19 


33 








J D Lentz 


34 
30 
37 
36 
36 


3 
2 
4 
3 
4 


5 

1 

13 
*3 

5 


35 

9 

198 

14 

88 


63 
20 
220 
18 
90 


98 
29 

418 
32 

178 










J. A. McLean 

E. J. Green 








Durham . - 


151 
13 


186 
15 


337 


Edenton 


R. H. Bachman 

R. S. Kendrickr 


28 


Elizabeth City... 

Fayetteville 

Fremont 




J A Jones 


32 


3 


4 


45 


84 


§129 


. 






W. M. Rogers 


36 


3 


1 


8 


9 


17 


7 


8 


15 


Gastonia 


Joe S. Wray 


32 


4 


4 


51 


72 


123 


47 


53 


100 


Goldsboro 


J. L. Hathcock 


36 


4 


t7 


80 


97 


177 


66 


87 


153 


Graham 


A. T. Allen 


34 
36 


3 
3 


*3 
10 


19 
131 


24 
160 


43 
291 


15 
96 


20 
126 


35 


Greensboro 


W. C. Jackson 


222 


Greenville 


Miss Eula Cox 


32 


2 


3 


13 


26 


39 


9 


21 


30 


Grifton 


No report 




















Hamlet 


W. L. Cridlebaugh... 
C. C. Caldwell 


38 
36 


2 
3 


1 
*3 


2 
25 


13 
55 


15 
80 








Henderson 


19 


46 


65 


Hertford 


S. B. Underwood 


32 


2 


*3 


10 


14 


24 


9 


13 


22 


Hickory . 


Chas. M. Staley 


32 


3 


3 


47 


46 


93 


37 


39 


76 


High Point 


Will Francis 


31 


3 


t5 


30 


38 


68 


31 


25 


56 


Kings Mountain 


No report . 




















Kinston. 


J . E. Pearson 

J. L. Harris .. 


36 
36 


3 
4 


*4 
4 


25 
23 


57 
33 


82 
56 








Lenoir 






1 



42 



Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 



Table IV. — Continued. 



Town or Village 

High School, 

1908-'09. 



Lexington 

Lincolnton 

Lumberton 

Marion 

Maxton 

Monroe 

Mooresville - 

Morganton 

Mount Airy. 

Mount Olive 

Nashville.. - 

New Bern- 

Newton 

North Wilkesboro 

Oxford 

Plymouth - 

Raleigh 

Randleman 

Roanoke Rapids _ 

Rockingham 

Rocky Mount 

Roxboro 

Salisbury 

Sanford 

Scotland Neck. . 

Selma.. -, 

Shelby 

Smithfield 

Spencer 

Spring Hope 

Statesville 

Thomasville 

Troy 

Wadesboro 



Superintendent 
or Principal. 



W. M. Brown 

B. P. Caldwell 

No report 

No report 

R. L. Thomasson 

L. P. Wilson 

A. C. Kerley 

Jos. E. Avent 

E. S. Sheppe.. 

Z. D. McWhorter 

No report 

Miss M. L. Hendren , 

E. O. Smithdeal 

W. G. Coltrane 

J. R. Conley 

C. J. Everett 

Hugh Morson 

N. F. Farlow 

A. E. Akers... 

Miss Marianna Mann 

J. O. Faulkner 

H. A. Neal 

N. V. Taylor 

R. W. Allen 

Miss Nannie G. Guy . 

B. F. Hassell 

J. Y. Irwin 

Ira T. Turlington 

No report 

No report 

H. E. Craven 

J. N. Hauss 

Wade Cranf ord 

J. H. Mclver 



Is, 

m 

to v-z. 



o 

!-. a 

3 <U O 



32 
32 



35 

36 
34 
36 
32 
32 



30 
32 
36 
36 
31 
29 
32 
32 
36 
36 
32 
28 
32 
35 
36 
32 
35 



^-| O 
O O . 



3 
*5 



34 
32 
32 
32 



3i 

1 

3 

3 

3 

4 

2 

1 

2i 

4 

3 

4 

4 

3 

2 

3 

3 



Enrollment. 



*2 
t6 
*2 
*4 

2 
°3 



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O 



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30 



9 
39 
18 
42 
32 
29 



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1 
*3 

3 
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7 

11 

1 

3 

5 
%h 

4 

3 
t4 

1 

3 

2 



o 

2 

1 

t3 



33 

2 

26 

26 

15 

101 

10 

1 

9 

74 
25 
61 
39 
27 
3 
23 
26 



O 



33 
33 



20 
64 
29 
64 
39 
36 



o 

Eh 



Average Daily 
Attendance. 



tn 
O 



53 
63 



34 
12 
12 
14 



54 
7 
24 
41 
22 

108 

9 

4 

18 

88 

43 

103 
41 
40 
18 
31 
24 



29 
103 

47 
106 

71 

65 



43 
25 
17 

12 



87 
9 
50 
67 
37 

209 

19 

5 

27 

162 
68 

164 
SO 
67 
21 
54 
50 



28 



8 
31 
15 

38 



27 



28 

2 

24 



77 
37 
29 
26 



83 
8 
1 



20 
47 
30 
23 



17 



28 



C 



31 



17 
55 
23 
55 



33 



44 

6 

22 



91 
7 
3 



37 
74 
35 
35 



17 



40 



Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 



43 



Table JV. — Continued. 



Town or Village 

High School, 

190S-'09. 


Superintendent 
or Principal. 


Length of 
Term in 
Weeks. 


Number of 
Years in 
Course. 


Number of 

High-school 

Teachers. 


Enrollment. 


Average Daily 
Attendance. 


CO 

O 

m 


o 


"3 
o 
Eh 


O 
W 


o 


■(3 

■4-3 

o 


Waynesville 

Weldon 


W. C. Allen. 


36 
35 
32 
36 
37 


4 
3 
4 
3 
4 


4 
°3 
t9 

4 

7 


76 

s 

68 
34 
86 


77 
14 

191 
55 

110 


153 
22 

259 
89 

196 


60 

7 
58 


68 

13 

162 


128 


Miss B. Thompson... 
J. B. Huff. 


20 


Wilmington 


220 


Wilson 


Fred Archer 

W. S. Snipes (s) 


72 


Winston 

















*One teacher gives only one-half time to high-school instruction. 
tTwo teachers give only one-half time to high-school instruction. 
JThree teachers give only one-half time to high-school instruction. 
§Number given in preliminary report early in session. 
"Teachers do not give full time to high-school instruction. 



44 



Public High Schools, 1908-1909. 



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47 






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4— ++S030 



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



STATE INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS 



NORTH CAROLINA 



FOR THE 



SCHOLASTIC YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 1910 



INCLUDING A 



REPORT OF THE TOWN AND VILLAGE HIGH SCHOOLS 



BY • 

N. W. WALKER 

PROFESSOR OF SECONDARY EDUCATION IN THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH 
CAROLINA AND STATE INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS 



Part III— 4 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 



Chapel Hill, N. C, November 21, 1910. 
Honorable J. Y. Joyner, 

State Superintendent of Public Instnictian, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Dear Sir:— I have the honor to submit herewith my third Annual Report 
of the Public High Schools, established under an act of the Legislature of 
1907, for the scholastic year ending June 30, 1910. 

I have included, also, in accordance with your instructions, such a report of 
the city and town high schools as could be made from the reports sent in to 
your office by the principals of these schools. 

Very truly yours, N. W. WALKER, 

State Iwspector of Puhlio High Schools. 



L 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Letter of Transmittal. 

Comments and Suggestions. 

High-school Instruction in Two-teacher Schools. 

Elementary School Operated in Connection with High School. 

Recommendations. 

Extracts from Principals' Reports. 

New Schools Established and Schools Discontinued or Moved. 

Miscellaneous. 

Summaries of Tables I, II, III, IV, V. 

Table I — Public High Schools. 
Schools. 
Principals. 
Enrollment. 
Attendance. 

Table II — Public High Schools. 
Studies Pursued. 
Students Pursuing the Different Branches. 

Table III — Public High Schools. 

Financial Report — Receipts and Expenditures. 

Table IV — City and Town High Schools. 
Schools Reporting. 
Principals. 
Enrollment. 
Attendance. 

Table V — City and Town High Schools. 
Studies Pursued. 
Students Pursuing the Different Branches. 







H 
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REPORT OF THE STATE INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC HIGH 

SCHOOLS, 1909-1910. 



I 



COMMENTS AND SUGGESTIONS. 

Number, Classification, and Distribution of Schools. — During tbe year cov- 
ered by this report, 1909-'10, the number of public high schools in operation 
increased over the preceding year from 160 to 170. The number of four- 
year schools increased from 2 to 10; the number of three-year schools, from 
52 to 69; and there was a net reduction in the number of two-year schools 
from 106 to 91. 

The public high schools are now pretty well distributed over the State — 
literally, from Currituck to Cheroliee. There were this year only 11 counties 
without such schools, and apportionments were made to two of these, but 
were vmused because the schools to which they were made failed to meet the 
State's requirements. For the year 1910-'ll there are only 9 counties without 
public high schools, namely, Brunswick, Chowan, Dare, Graham, New Han- 
over, Pasquotank. Perquimans, Tyrrell, and Watauga. Of these 9 it will be 
observed that 2 are in the extreme west and 7 in the extreme east. 

Enrollment and Attendance. — These schools enrolled this year 5,775 stu- 
dents and made an average daily attendance of 4,145. The increase in 
enrollment over the preceding year was 493, or 9.33 per cent, and the increase 
in attendance was 358, or 9.45 per cent. The number of students enrolled 
from outside the local district was 1,608; the number of boarding students 
enrolled was 1,190; and the number of teachers enrolled was 349. 

In view of the fact that in 1908-'09 there was an increase in enrollment of 
34 per cent over the preceding year, it would seem that the increase of only 
9.33 per cent for the year 1909-'10 is rather small. But it must be added 
that during this year the schools have been a little better organized, and that 
many pupils who formerly would have been graded as high-school pupils were 
not this year counted as such. For instance, there were several hundred 
grammar-school pupils pursuing one or two branches in the high school who 
were not counted as high-school pupils at all. And again, it would seem that 
there was a falling off in the number of boarding students, whereas such was 
not the case. In the report for 1908-'09 there were reported by the principals 
1,563 boarding pupils; but since this number included all high-school pupils 
enrolled from outside the local district, many of whom boarded at home, the 
number of actual boarders could not be obtained. In this report the proper 
distinction has been made by the principals in their reports, as is shown in 
one of the tables below, in order that the number of actual boarding students 
might be known. 

Teaching Force. — The number of teachers in the public high schools has 
been increased from 236 to 259, and there was urgent necessity for more as- 
sistant teachers in many of the schools, which could not be met because of a 
lack of means. And there is going to be a still greater demand for addi- 
tional teachers from now on, as the schools develop and increase their courses 
of study from two to three years and from three years to four. There has 
been gradual improvement, too, in the preparation of the teachers entering 



s 



54 Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 

the Iiigh-school work from year to year. Most of them are now graduates 
of our better colleges and universities, and practically all of those who are 
not graduates are college trained. It is true that many of them who enter 
the work are fresh from college and have had but little or no experience in 
teaching, but every effort is made to assist them through conferences with the 
State Superintendent and Inspector of High Schools, through visitation and 
suLCgestion, and throuy;h high-school literature sent out from the State Depart- 
ment and from the University. 

Receipts and Expend itures.^The total receipts this year increased from 
$123,318.16 to $138,631.77, and the total expenditures increased from $112,985.63 
to $127,054.88, making a net increase of $15,313.61 in receipts and $14,069.25 
in expenditures. 

The average salary of the high-school principal was increased from $622.42 
to $665.93. There were 10 principals who received $1,000 or more, and 27 
who received less than $500. These figures do not include four graded schools 
that received students on a tuition basis and one school whose term was 
unavoidably cut short. The total expenditures for principals' salaries in- 
creased from $98,187.59 to $109,878.52. 

The average amount expended per pupil' enrolled was $22; the average cost 
per pupil in daily attendance was $30.65. The highest amount paid per pupil 
seems to have been paid in the Morven High School. The cost per pupil 
enrolled in that school was $59.38, and the cost per pupil in daily attendance 
was $92.54. This, of course, with our present limited funds for high-school 
instruction, is out of reason. 

There were calls this year for about $25,000 more for high-school instruc- 
tion than was available. Many of the schools have now developed to the 
point where additional equipment and teaching force are absolutely necessary 
if they are to continue to develop and to increase in efficiency. 

Length of Term. — The average length of the term of the high schools was 
30 2-5 weeks. This is an increase of only two-fifths of a week over last year. 

Improvement in Equipment and High-school Environment.— -Several new 
high-school buildings have been erected during the year, and much decided 
improvement has been made in the general surroundings of many of the 
schools. Several schools, too, have secured dormitories, two have secured 
large and valuable farms (Reynoldson High School in Gates County and 
Teacheys High School in Duplin Coimty). and many have made advancement 
in other directions. I have appended below a number of extracts from the 
principals' reports which tell in a terse, concise way something of the im- 
provements made in the directions mentioned above and also show the schools 
and the commiuiities in which such activity has been taking place. 

The photographs in this report show a few of the new buildings recentl.v 
erected to accommodate iniblic high schools. All of those shown, w^ith possi- 
bly one exception, were erected or enlarged and improved in response to the 
demand for better accommodations for the high schools. These few views 
tell a more graphic story of the progress that has been made than could be 
given in words. 

Better Internal Organization. — A persistent effort has been made to improve 
the internal organization of the high schools, and some improvement has been 
made in this direction. Much has been accomplished towards this end 
through the high-school literature, and especially through the series of con- 



Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 55 

fei-ences held with the priucipals and county superintendents at Greensboro, 
Greenville, Asheville, and Goldsboro. 

Conferences with Principals. — These meetings afforded an excellent oppor- 
tunity for the principals to discuss together, iu an informal way, with the 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction and the State Inspector of Public 
High Schools, some of their definite problems, and to have answered such 
questions relating to the organization and administration of the high schools 
as they might wish to ask. In this way they got a better understanding of 
what the high-school movement really means, were better prepared to attack 
their problems in the light of larger experience, were better enabled to see 
matters of administration from the point of view of the State, and thus to 
work together with greater unity of purpose. 

No formal programs were prepared for these meetings, but the general 
order of work and the topics discussed were about as follows: 

First Day — A joint meeting of the county superintendents and public high- 
school principals, at which meeting topics of common interest were discussed ; 
such as The Relation of the Public High School to the County System of 
Schools ; The Necessity for Cooperation Between the Principal and the Super- 
intendent; The Necessity for Keeping Complete Records, and for Making 
Prompt and Accurate Reports (financial and statistical). 

Se(oxd Day — A meeting of the high-school principals, at which such topics 
as the following were discussed: The Admission. Gradation, and Promotion 
of Pupils; brief reports from the various principals as to the progress of 
their schools ; The High-school Library and the Literary Society ; How to 
Advertise the School Through Catalogues. Circular-letters, and the Local 
Press ; and various other topics which the priucipals brought up for dis- 
cussion. 

These meetings certainly should be continued, for they have meant more 
for the improvement of the schools than any other single effort put forth in 
this direction. 

HIGH-SCHOOL INSTRUCTION IN TWO-TEACHER SCHOOLS. 

I wish to quote from my report for last year what I had to say regarding 
high-school instruction in two-teacher schools : 

"As soon as it is practicable to do so, it will be to the best Interest of both 
the public high schools and the elementary schools to discontinue the teaching 
of high-school branches in the two-teacher countr5' schools. There are per- 
haps SOO or more of these two-teacher schools in which some high-school 
instruction is given. I have taken occasion to look into the work of these 
schools as closely and as carefully as time would permit, and I am frank to 
say that much of the high-school instruction offered is but little better than 
none at all. 

"Two teachers who have to instruct 65 or more pupils in all the branches of 
the first seven grades ought not to attempt to give instruction in the high- 
school branches. To do so is, in most cases, a mere waste of time. It means, 
too, that the lower grades must be neglected and that the high-school instruc- 
tion must be given in a haphazard way, without any plan or system, and 
without adequate time for recitation periods. It too frequently happens that 
two or three advanced pupils who are pursuing one or two high-school sub- 
jects — say, Latin and Algebra or General History — are allowed to take up 



56 Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 

one-half (or more in some cases) of one teacher's time, while 30 or 40 pupils 
in the elementary grades are being neglected. Again it happens that the 
recitation periods for the high-school classes are not more than ten minutes in 
length, and thus the high-school pupils are neglected ; or, sometimes, the 
teacher has a "favorite study" which is overstressed to the neglect of all 
other subjects. Such aimless, haphazard work ought not to be permitted ; and 
now that the public high school is within comparatively easy reach of all 
pupils of high-school grade, there is no valid reason why such pupils should 
not be taken out of the local two-teacher school and sent on to the public 
high school. 

"Of course, local community pride will in many cases revolt against this 
idea, and may for a time operate against the plan proposed ; but as soon as 
the general public shall become actually sensible of the fact that the high 
school is not merely a local school, but that it is a county institution, this 
objection will no longer exist. The County Superintendent can do much to 
remedy the situation discussed above by encouraging the older pupils to go on 
to the public high school, and many of them are exerting their influence in 
this direction with good results. But there are not a few cases in which the 
pride of the teacher hjis counteracted the influence of the Superintendent and 
kept the pupils at home in the two-teacher school by assuring parents that 
just as good advantages are offered in the local school as are offered in the 
high school. This situation can be met most effectually by requiring every 
teacher in the public schools who teaches high-school subjects to hold a State 
certificate. 

"If the public schools having three or more teachers continue to give high- 
school instruction, they ought to be required to employ for this work regu- 
larly licensed high-school teachers, to organize their work upon a respectable 
basis, allowing adequate time for recitation periods, and to follow systematic 
courses of instruction. Otherwise, such schools will operate against any com- 
pact and effective organization of the public high-school work." 

THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL OPERATED IN CONNECTION WITH THE 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

I am firmly convinced that more attention should be paid to the elementary 
school operated in connection with the public high school. I beg to repeat 
what I had to say in this connection in my report one year ago : 

"The public high school has a vital organic relation to the public elementary 
school below it, and this relationship must never be lost sight of. If either 
the public high school or the elementary school is ever to be made really 
efficient, the other must be made reasonably so. It is necessary, then, that a 
little more attention be paid to the elementary school conducted in connection 
with the public high school. xVlthough both schools may at present be con- 
ducted in the same building, they are legally constituted two separate and 
distinct schools. The public high school is held up to requirements that the 
elementary school may disregard with impunity. The one belongs to the 
county and is open, free of tuition, to pupils of high-school age residing in all 
parts of the county; the other is purely local, drawing its patronage only 
from the contiguous territory. The one must be reasonably well equipped, 
must follow systematic courses of instruction, and must have competent 
instructors; the other, too frequently, is a law unto itself in these respects. 



Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 5Y 

The public high school has at its head a principal liceused by the State, who 
also exercises supervisory and disciplinary functions over the elementary 
school, but he has no voice m the selection of the teachers whose work he is 
to supervise, nor has the County Board of Education or the State. 

"Now, it is necessary that the elementary schools which are operated in 
connection with the public high schools, in the same building and under the 
same principal, shall be well equipped, well organized, and well taught. The 
merely nominal requirement, that the elementary school shall be well provided 
for. is practically inoperative. 

"Much can be done to improve these elementary schools by establishing for 
them some standard of teaching efficiency. Every teacher in one of these 
schools ought to be required at least to hold the first-grade county certificate, 
and a much better requirement would be that every such teacher should hold the 
five-year State certificate. To exact such a requirement at once would seem, 
in many cases, to impose an undue hardship ; nevertheless, it would certainly 
improve the instruction in the elementary grades, which would mean decided 
improvement in the high school as well. And along with this requirement 
should come minimum salary and minimum term regulations. Not a few 
communities are at present crippling their elementary schools in order to raise 
the required funds for the high schools. This should not be allowed. The 
high school and the elementary school must be improved together." 

Again, many of the high schools are to-day so seriously fettered by the ele- 
mentary schools operated in connection with them that development seems 
hopeless. Time and again it happens that a local committee will endeavor to 
use. either directly or indirectly, high-school funds for elementary school 
instruction. Of course, this practice is forbidden, and it is checked whenever 
it is discovered. But local committees in too many cases do not discriminate 
between the elementary school and the high school. If the money is to the 
credit of the school, they are goiug to use it in one way or another. It seems 
difficult to get committees to understand in the first place the meaning of 
"high school," and in the second place that the high school and' the elementary 
school, though operated in the same building, are legally constituted two sep- 
arate and distinct schools. It frequently happens that an effort is made, 
where the elementary school is crowded and the high school is not, to force 
the principal to do a part of the elementary school work; again it happens 
that an effort is made to have one of the elementary school teachers paid from 
the high-school fund by giving her a class in the high school and paying her, 
say, two-thirds of her salary out of the high-school fund. For such illegal 
practices the apportionments to several schools have been greatly reduced or 
withdrawn altogether. It was never intended by the high-school law that one 
cent of the high-school fund should go for elementary instruction, thus causing 
the local elementary school to develop at the expense of the county high 
school, nor that the elementary school operated in connection with the high 
school should become a fetter to the high school and thus handicap its growth. 

The point at issue here is that in too many cases the administrative policy 
of the high school is too largely shaped by local opinion and governed by 
purely local needs. Definite standards of excellence must be demanded of the 
high school which the local elementary school for the present cannot hope to 
attain, and these standards can only be demanded by officials whose policy 
and action are not shaped wholly by local needs. 



58 Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 

Unless the evils referred to iu the foregoing paragraphs are elimiuated or 
reduced to a minimum, it is going to be necessary to segregate the high school 
from the elementary school altogether. It is beginning to appear that segre- 
gation is the only satisfactory solution to this problem if the integrity of the 
high school is to be preserved and if its standard of efficiency is to be ad- 
vanced. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

In my report two years ago I called attention in a general way to the type 
of central high school that we should begin to build. I wish to bring forward 
certain passages from that report : 

"As at present organized, the public high school is within comparatively 
easy reach of the majority of pupils of high-school age. Thus the high 
school is a matter of personal interest to a majority of the people, and this 
popular interest is going to serve as a valuable asset iu our work of the 
future. In starting this system we have proceeded along the line of least 
resistance, and I am confident we have made a proper beginning. A sure 
foundation has been laid upon which the structure of the future may be 
reared. Now, if we are to develop the type of high school that can be made 
of most service, we must begin to build along somewhat broader lines ; we 
must take steps at the earliest practicable moment to develop the strong 
central high school, one for each county, fully equipped, offering strong 
courses of study, and segregated, if necessary, from the elementary school. 
This central school, in every ease, should be required to offer full four-year 
courses of instruction, in the classics, the sciences, and industry. I am confi- 
dent that this type of school must come if the demands of the present and 
the future are to be met, and if the high-school work is to possess the strength, 
and the dignity, and the importance that justly belong to it. And as these 
schools grow and extend their influence there must come in connection with 
each one the principal's home, the mess-hall, and dormitory facilities. A few 
counties are now ready, it seems to me, to build the central high school, and I 
can see no reason why they should not be encouraged to do so. * * * 

"The mess-hall and the dormitory are adjuncts that must be provided very 
soon. Already hundreds of students from the adjoining districts and from 
distant parts of the" counties are crowding into these public high schools, who 
must find board in the neighborhood of the schools. * * * 

"Another matter that ought to be considered in planning for the central 
high school of the future is that of acquiring suitable lands for the purposes 
of agricultural and industrial instruction. When it is generally understood 
by the people of the rural districts that the State has taken up the work of 
secondary education with seriousness of purpose, and that it intends to build 
for its youth such schools as the futiu-e may demand, then it will be an easy 
matter to secure by donation, without one cent of cost in most cases, at a 
very small expense in any case, sufficient lands for the pui-poses of the high 
school. It will be a very wise investment for any community to donate the 
land for the central high school to the county in order to secure the location 
of the school. The increasing demand for instruction in agricultiu*e, domestic 
science, and manual training is bound to be met in some way, and in planning 
for the larger growth of the public high school this fact must be taken into 
consideration. 

"This, in brief, is the plan we must begin to work towards. We cannot ac- 
complish everything at once, but if the proper encouragement is given, it will 



Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 59 

be a matter of only a few years before every county in the State can have 
and will have one strong central high school. But in recommending the cen- 
tral high school I would not be misunderstood ; I do not advocate the discon- 
tinuance of the small high school, such as now exists in most of the counties. 
It will doubtless be necessary to discontinue many of the small schools, but 
it will be well if, in addition to the central school, each county, according to 
its wealth and size, can maintain from two to four small secondary schools 
convenientlj^ located and offering about two years of the high-school course. 
These small schools can be operated at small expense, and they will bring 
high-school instruction within reach of a larger number of pupils who will 
not, for some years, at any rate, attend the central school." 

The logical unit of organization and of support for the central high school 
is the county ; and, if the type of school which we most need is to be developed, 
it Is plain that the county must be made the basis of its support rather than 
the district or the township. To make the county the unit would not only 
make it possible for the central high school to receive adequate support, but 
it would also remove the officers from certain local fettering influences that 
are now impeding the progress of so many of our .schools. Provision should 
be made to allow counties establishing central high schools to provide for 
their support either by a direct high-school tax or by apportionment from the 
general county school fund In cases where this fund is sufficiently large to 
justify it. 

Certain it is that more money niust be raised for the central high school ; 
yet In many counties there is far more expended for high-school instruction 
of an indifferent sort than would be required to operate a first-class central 
high school, could this be concentrated and could the high-school pupils be 
assembled in one school. 

The township, or in some cases the district or village, could be made the 
\anit of organization for the small two-year school now in operation in so 
many of the coimties. As so many of the short-term couuty schools are not 
able to prepare adequately for high-school work, it might be well to allow 
those small schools to offer three years' work, beginning with the seventh 
grade. They could then advance their students so they could complete the 
remainder of the course at the central high school in two years. It may be 
found practicable to continue these schools as State graded schools, thus en- 
abling them to improve the quality of their instruction from the first grade 
up. Such a plan would have telling effect upon increasing local taxation and 
consolidation, and in hastening transportation where that is necessary. 

If such a plan as I have briefly sketched is ever carried out. the State ap- 
propriation for high schools would have to be greatly Increased in order that 
the maximum State apportionment to the central high school might be $1,500 
or $2,000, made on condition, of course, that all necessary buildings, equip- 
ment, etc., be provided without cost to the State, and that the county contrib- 
ute a like amount for annual expenses of the high school, raised either by 
taxation or by apportionment from the general county fund. 

SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS. 

1. Make the county the unit of organization and the unit of support. 

2. Segregate the central high school from the elementary school, and thus 
free it from too great dominance of purely local interest and influence. 



60 Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 

3. Continue the small two-year high schools now in operation, converting 
them, if necessary, into State graded schools, and requiring of their lower 
grades higher standards of efficiency. 

4. Increase the State appropriation for public high schools to $100 000, and 
increase the maximum apportionment to the central school to $1,500 or $2,000. 



EXTRACTS FROM PRINCIPALS' REPORTS. 

Principal J. A. Hoenaday, Friendship High School, Alamance County: 
Boys' farm-life and girls' home-life clubs have been organized, and a school 
fair to be held in the fall has been planned. 



Principal J. C. Crawfobd, Morven High School, Anson County: 
Have just finished a new building worth $9,000. 



Principal J. O. Goodman, Helton High School, Ashe County: 
A large boarding hall has been built. 



Principal L. E. Bennett, Fantego High School, Beaufort County: 
A number of books have been added to the library. Several pictures, includ- 
ing a large one of Washington, have been framed. The school garden has 
been increased to twice its former size, making it now include almost a 
quarter of an acre. A school farm of three acres has been planted in cotton. 
The musemxi has been greatly increased in size, and three cases have been 
secured in which to keep it. A teacher's chair and desk, and ten desks for 
the primary room have been purchased. A Woman's Betterment Association 
has been organized and is doing excellent work. A new building is to be 
erected this summer, and another teacher added to the teaching force of the 
high school next year. The outlook for the future is bright. 



Principal Ethel May Carroll, Mars Hill High School, Bertie County: 
Another room, valued at $200, has been added to the building as a result 
of betterment work. 

Principal F. M. Smith, Blaclenhoro High School, Bladen County: 
Music department has been added, a music-room built, and piano installed. 



Principal L. A. Bickle, Rocky River High School, Caharrus County: 
A new school building now occupies a more desirable site. It is well ar- 
ranged and suitably furnished with desks and blackboards. 



Principal L. E. Mauney, Murphy High School, Cherokee County: 
New building is now in progress, to cost $20,000. 



Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 61 

Principal D. M. Stallings, Hayesville Hkih School, Clay County: 

With a dormitory to accommodate our boarding students and witli more 

funds to increase our teaching force, \\q could double our enrollment for next 

year. 

Principal S. G. Hasty, Churchland High School, Davidson County: 
Our literary society halls have recently been furnished. Our reading-room 
has been supplied with numbers of magazines and papers. 



Principal P. E. Shaw, Teacheys High School, Duplin County: 
The Betterment Association, composed of the people of the district, bought a 
$2,000 school farm, a team, and farming implements, and have the land now 
in cultivation ; also, employ the principal twelve months in the year, so he 
lives on the farm and has general supervision of both the farm and school. 



Principal B. I. Tart, Warsaw High School, Duplin County: 
We expect to erect a new school building, to cost not less than $12,000, 
next year. 

Principal J. W. Daniel, Bethania High School, Forsyth County: 
As we stated in our last report, the front lawn of the school property has 
been beautifully graded, laid off in walks, sown in grass, and enclosed by a 
neat and substantial fence. 

Three hundred strong, neat folding chairs have been provided for the audi- 
torium. Just before our last commencement electric lights were installed in 
our building. Another piano was bought during the last session. We now 
have two, and our facilities for music are good. 



Principal J. W. Speas, KernersvUle High School, Forsyth County: 

A number of new desks have been added. Fixtures for electric lights have 

been placed in the building. A library has been started, and forty volumes 

have been secured. 

Principal Santford Martin, Bunn High School, Franklin County: 
The school building has been painted inside. Gas lights have been installed 
throughout the building. One hundred volumes have been added to the 
library. Proceeds of a play given at commencement, amounting to $63, left 
in the treasury to be used for school Improvements next year. 



Principal S. G. Lindsay, Dallas High School, Gaston County: 
Forty volumes have been added to our library. Woman's Betterment Asso- 
ciation purchased six water-coolers for school, costing $22.50. Electric lights 
have been put in auditorium. Dusteen was put on all school tloors, and a 
quantity of disinfectant was purchased. Two hundred dollars was spent in 
painting and repairing interior of schoolrooms. 



62 Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 

Mrs. T. W. Costen, Principal Reynoldson High School, Gates County: 
A fine school spirit pervades the community. The trustees have purchased 
for the school a 90-acre farm, adjoining the school grounds, at a cost of $3,000. 
(There is a large three-story building on the farm purchased, formerly used 
as a hotel, which will be removed and used as a dormitory building and prin- 
cipal's home.) A music school of 17 pupils adds a fourth member to the 
faculty. The Betterment Association presented a $10 flag on Thanksgiving 
Day. A number of farmers in the community have planted each an acre of 
corn for the school. 

Principal J. A. Pitts, Creedmoor High School, Granville County: 

Trees have been planted and the grounds sown in preparation for grass. 

The school has grown in numbers so that it will be necessary to add the fifth 

teacher another year. 

Principal M. S. Giles, Stem High School, GranviUe County: 
The new building erected during the summer of 1909 was in readiness for 
the opening September 13. This building, which cost $4,000, is one of Stem's 
best assets. It is furnished with patent desks and nice blackboards. The 
Woman's Betterment Association, organized this year, has raised $220. Build- 
ing painted since school closed. 

Principal S. T. Liles, Monticello High School, Guilford County: 

New high-school building erected, costing $3,500. Thirty-two new patent 

single desks bought and presented to the school by the high-school pupils. 

New 10-room boarding-house erected, costing $2,500. Another teacher added. 



Principal W. H. Albright, Aurelian Springs High School, Halifa-v County: 
One new room added, extra teacher employed, and blackboards, teachers' 
desks, etc., added. School growing all the time in numbers, efficiency, and 
ability to promote the cause of education. "We are anxious to establish a de- 
partment of domestic science ; also, a school farm. 



Miss Josephine McLendon, Principal Harmony High School, Iredell County: 
Music hall built, and piano placed in same. 



Principal J. M. Watts, Scotts High School, Iredell County: 
Building has been enlarged and painted. It is now much more convenient, 
and the seating capacity has been increased at least 35 per cent. 



Principal L. T. Royall, Benson High School, Johnston County: 
An additional lot has been purchased, thereby enlarging our grounds. Prep- 
arations are being made to enlarge the building at once. 



Public High Schools, 1000-1910. 63 

Principal J. Lacy McLean, Wilson's Mills High Schooh Johnston County: 
We have raised $65 for the piano fund. 



Principal Alex. H. White, Pollocksvllle High School, Jones County: 
Trees planted on yard. A first-class piano purchased. A music depart- 
ment established. 

Miss Josie Doub, Principal Joneshoro High School, Lee County: 
Our school has been furnished with 90 new patent desks, 4 water-coolers, 
5 coal heaters that replaced wood stoves, and a library of 145 volumes. The 
school children were organized into a Junior Betterment League to keep the 
grounds in good condition. 



Miss Laura M. Jones, Principal Higdonville High School, Macon County: 
New building; road; 56 feet of blackboard; money has been raised to bring 
water to the house in pipes. This will be done before the fall term opens. 



Principal Hoy Tayt.ob, Biscoe High School, Montgomery County: 
The fourth year and another teacher are to be added next year. 



Principal W. F. Allen, Southern Pines High Scliool, Moore County: 
The school grounds have been cleared of weeds, etc. A bubble fountain has 
been placed in the playgrounds. 

Principal Pall II. Nance, Red Oak High School, l\'asli County: 
Supplementary library, ten patent desks, two pianos added. One ten-room 
dormitory built, costing, with furniture, etc., about $2,250. 



Principal E. C. Ruffin, Rich Square High School, Northampton County: 
During the year 1909-1910 new desks, shades, blackboards, stoves, etc., have 
been bought. A good literary society has been organized, and a very credita- 
ble reading-room has been started. A new library case was bought, and the 
umnber of volumes doubled during the year. Several magazines and current 
papers come regularly to our school. 



Principal Kadeb R. Curtis, Severn High School, ISiorthampton County: 
New high-school building costing $4,400 ; new single desks for three rooms, 
opera chairs for auditorium. 

Principal John W. Hall, Richlands High School, Onslow County: 
Our school has been only a three-year school. The Board of Education de- 
cided at the last meeting to put in an additional year. 



64 Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 

Principal Julian B. Martin, Bethel High School, Pitt County: 
We have enclosed school grounds with a $75 fence ; have built cement walk 
at $75; and added $8 worth of books to our English library. 



Principal George W. Bbadshaw, Farmer High School, Randolph County: 
At the beginning of the year all classrooms were supplied with best hylo- 

plate blackboard and heaters. Fifty patent single desks were added to the 

high-school department. 

Principal T. D. Sharpe, Liberty High School, Randolph County: 

Our new building was completed this year at a cost of $10,000. We took 

the responsibility of seating our auditorium with nice chairs, the money for 

which was made by public entertainments. 



Principal Walter F. McCanless, Philadelphus High School, Robeson 
County: 
Piano bought ; schoolhouse painted ; school grounds improved. 



Principal Albert New, Ruffln High School, Rockingham County: 
The schoolhouse has been painted. National flag has been presented by the 
J. O. U. A. M. Library founded. 



Principal L. R. Hoffman, Henrietta High School, Rutherford County: 
Purchased $111.02 worth of books for a library. 



Principal Billy Robinson, Newton Grove High School, Sampson County: 
Entire school w^ell supplied with hyloplate boards. Money raised for this 
by a box supper. An election soon to be held to add additional territory to 
the high-school district. If this carries, it will eliminate a public school and 
strengthen two others. Attendance in high-school department more than 
doubled over last year. 

Principal E. C. Byerly, Walnut Cove High School, Stokes County: 
The school building was nicely painted ; about twenty new desks were pur- 
chased, and plans are now being gotten up to build a new schoolhouse for 
next year. 

Principal J. L. Teague, Elkin High School, Surry County: 
Books to the amount of about $60 have been placed in the library. A eon- 
tract has been made for li/^ acres of land for the school. 



Principal Jerry Day, Rockford High School, Surry County: 
We have purchased a piano and an organ. The teachers are giving two 
weeks to extend school for an entertainment. 



Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 65 

Priucipal W. B. Reid, Marshville High School, Union County: 

We are building a $10,000 house, modern, well equipped and furnished in 

every way. The interest in school worlv has increased, and we hope to have 

a good school. 

Principal R. A. Foard, Bay Leaf High School, WaJce County: 

A dormitory which cost about $2,000 was built and equipped in part. 



Principal Kenneth H. McIntyke, Holly Springs High School, Wake County: 
We have established a domestic science class and fitted up a fairly good 

kitchen. We have bought a physics laboratory. We also have a small 

laboratory for teaching agriculture. 



Principal R. C. Holton, WaJcelon High School, Wake Count }/: 

Yielding somewhat to the demand for less Latin, I did not require it to be 
taken by pupils having little opportunity of going to college, or by those seri- 
ously objecting to that study. I supplied instrumental music, agriculture, 
and civil government. 

The Wakelon and Zebulon divisions of the school were brought together (in 
the new $15,000 building) February 14, and the work more thoroughly organ- 
ized. Two rooms were then available for the high-school work. 

The school farm idea is getting a better hold, and one acre is being well 
cultivated. A ton of high-grade guano has been given. First crop is good 
Irish potatoes; second will be corn. 

By invitation of Dr. Hill, the whole school visited the A. and M. College, 
the Capitol, the Governor, and Museum on April 23. That was a great day 
for us all. This is the first high school to visit the Governor in his office. 

We get the weather maps, reports, and bulletins of the U. S. Government. 



Principal E. P. Dixon, Wise High School, Warren County: 
Finished paying $75 on piano. New $15 bookcase bought Also added $30 
worth of books to the library. Class in agriculture begun. An acre is being 
worked under the supervision of the Department of Agriculture. 



Principal A. R. Freeman, Pikeville High School, Wayne County: 
We have brought the library up to 335 volumes, bought maps and pictures 
and installed gasoline lights. A patron has promised to give the lumber for 
a music-room, and this will be built during the summer. Interest is stimu- 
lated in the school by frequent notices in the local papers in regard to the 
work. The publishing of a catalogue was also found to be very helpful. 



Principal E. G. Suttlemyre, Wilkeshoro High School, WUkcs County: 
The school building has been practically completed, and 310 opera chairs 
are now being placed in the auditorium. For this and for other purposes 

Part III— 5 



60 Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 

about $600 has been raised by private donations and entertainments. Ar- 
rangements are now being made to change the old building into a dormitory 
for boarding students next year. 

Principal John S. Mitchell, Courtney High School, Yadkin County: 
School grounds have been enlarged and a teachers' home built since last 
year. 

NEW SCHOOLS ESTABLISHED AND SCHOOLS 
DISCONTINUED OR MOVED. 

Schools Discontinued, 1909-'10:* 

Cleveland Lattimore. 

Greene Sladesville. 

Hyde Sladesville. 

Union Unionville. 

Watauga Cove Creek. 

Schools Discontinued, 1910-'11: 

Graham Andrews.f 

Rowan Granite Quarry 

(moved to China Grove). 

Rutherford Henrietta 

(moved to Rutherfordton). 
New Schools Established, 1910-'11: 

Bladen -> White Oak. 

Cabarrus Wiuecoff. 

Greene Hookerton. 

Hyde Sladesville. 

Rowan China Grove. 

Rutherford Forest City. 

Rutherford Rutherfordton. 

Stanly • New London. 

Union Unionville. 

Wilson Rock Ridge. 

Yancey Elk Shoal. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Boarding Students and Teachers Enrolled. 

Number of boarding students enrolled 1,1J)0 

Boys 587 

Girls 603 



♦Apportionments were made to these five schools for the year 1909-'10, but they failed to 
meet the requirements and were discontinued. Sladesville and Unionville are ready to meet 
the requirements now, and so appear in the list of new schools for 1910-'ll. 

tThere was no public high school in Graham County; but the county was allowed, under 
a special act of the Legislature, to turn its apportionment over to Andrews High School, Cher- 
okee County, on condition that high-school pupils from Graham be allowed to attend the 
Andrews School free of tuition. The number of pupils from Graham was not sufficient to jus- 
tify the continuance of the State apportionment, and it was therefore withdrawn. 



Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 67 

Xiiuibcr of studeuts eurolled rruiu outside local district 1,G08 

Boys tn 858 

Gil-Is 750 

Number of teachers enrolled ' 349 

Male 145 

Female 204 

Pupils enrolled in elementary schools operated in connection with i)ub- 

lic high schools *20,712 

S(-veuth-gr;ide pupils rep(;rted by county superintendents (in 84 coun- 
ties) tl7,851 

Pupils reported by county superintendents (in 78 counties) as pur- 
suing high-school work in public high schools and in two-teacher 

schools $7,758 

Average cost per pupil enrolled $ 22.00 

Average cost per pupil in daily attendance 30.65 

Average salary paid principals G(i5.39 

(Not counting 4 schools receiving students on tuition basis and 1 
school whose term was unavoidably cut short.') 

Principals receiving $1,000 or more 10 

Principals receiving less than $500 27 

(Not counting 5 mentioned above.) 



PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— SUMMARY OF TABLE i. 
Schools: 

Number of schools established 170 

Schools reporting four-year courses 10 

Schools reporting three-year courses 69 

Schools reporting two-year courses 91 

Teachers: 

Total number of high-school teachers 259 

Number giving full time to high-school instruction 195 

Number giving part time to high-school instruction 64 

Number of male teachers 168 

Number of female teachers 91 

Niuiiber of male principals 157 

Number of female principals 13 

Enrollment: 

Total number of students enrolled 5,775 

Boys enrolled 2,764 

Girls enrolled ." 3,011 

Number of fourth-year students enrolled 64 

Number of third-year students enrolled 536 

Number of second-year students enrolled 1,634 

Number of first-year students enrolled 3,541 

*Eleven of the high-school principals did not furnish any information as to the number of 
pupils enrolled in the elementary school. 

tFourteen of the county superintendents did not report the number of seventh-grade 
pupils. The whole number is probably about 21,000. 

tTwenty of the county superintendents did not report this item. The whole number is 
probably 10,000. 



68 Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 

Number of students in four-year high schools 575 

Number of students in three-year high schools 2,719 

Number of students in t\YO-year high schools 2.481 

Attendance: 

Total average daily attendance 4,145 

Average daily attendance, boys 1,887 

Average daily attendance, girls 2,258 

PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— SUMMARY OF TABLE II. 

Number of students in 

English: 

Grammar 3,781 

Composition and rhetoric 3.442 

Literature 3,249 

Mathematics: 

Advanced arithmetic 4.367 

Algebra 4,26G 

Geometry 612 

History: 

English history 2,379 

Ancient history 1,190 

Medifeval history 414 

American history 924 

History of North Carolina 138 

Foreign Languages: 

Latin 4,268' 

Greek 48 

French 219 

German 98 

Science: 

Physical geography 1,479 

Physics 378 

Introduction to science 910 

Agriculture 517 

Botany 12 

Physiology 349 

Miscellaneous: 

Commercial geography 82 

Drawing 49 

Music 40 

Business methods 18 

Civil government 342 

Spelling 1,451 

Domestic science 18 

Expression 25 

Astronomy 5 



Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 69 



PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS— SUMMARY OF TABLE III. 
Receipts: 

From local taxation $ 40,446.86 

From private donations 8,558.72 

From county apportionments 30,908.24 

From State appropriation ' 49,025.00 

Balance on hand from last year 8,957.04 

Overdrafts paid from local funds 735.91 

Total receipts $138,631.77 

Disbursements: 

For principals' salaries .$109,878.52 

For salaries of assistant teachers 13.542.75 

For fuel, janitors, and incidentals *3, 633.61 

Total expenditures 127,054.88 

Balance on hand •$ 11,576.89 



CITY AND TOWN HIGH SCHOOLS— SU MMARY OF TABLE IV. 

Schools: 

Number of schools reporting 69 

Schools reporting four-year courses 26 

Schools reporting three-year courses t30 

Schools reporting two-year courses 10 

Schools reporting one-year course ■ 3 

Teachers: 

Total number of high-school teachers 271 

Number giving full time to high-school instruction 219 

Number giving part time to high-school instruction 52 

Enrollment and Attendance: 

Total number of students enrolled 6,256 

Boys enrolled '-'661 

Girls enrolled 3..595 

Total average daily attendance 4,992 



♦This item includes $395,61 paid on deficits for preceding year. 
tNew Bern and Washington report 3i-year courses. 



70 Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 

city and town high schools— su mm ary of table v. 

Number of schools reporting these items <;4 

Number of students in 

English: 

Grammar 3.172 

Composition and rhetoric 3,574 

Literature 4,432 

Mathematics: 

Advanced arithmetic , 3,228 

Algebra 4,5&4 

Geometry 1,003 

Trigonometry 

History: 

English history 1,708 

Ancient history 1,890 

Mediaeval history 1,083 

American history 1,G02 

History of North Curolinn 214 

Foreign Languages: 

Latin 5,517 

Greek 52 

Frencli 340 

German 192 

Science: 

Physical geography 1,690 

Physics 883 

Introduction to scitMu c 435 

Agriculture 355 

Botany 531 

Chemistry 73 

Physiologj- . . : 03 

Miscellaneous: 

Commercial geography 12 

Drawing 194 

Music 

Business courses 52 

Domestic science 102 

Manual training 41 

Spelling 577 

Civics 148 

Word analysis 29 

Zoology 237 



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96 



Public High Schools, 1909-1910. 



TABLE IV.— CITY AND TOWN HIGH SCHOOLS. 

ENROLLMENT, ATTENDANCE, ETC. 



High School, 
1909-'10. 



Aberdeen* 

Albemarle* 

Ashboro 

Asheville 

Belhaven 

Bessemer City*.. 

Brevard* 

Burlington 

Canton 

CarthageJ 

Charlotte 

Cherry ville 

Concord 

Dunn 

Durham 

Edenton 

Elizabeth City.. 

Fayetteville 

FranklintonJ 

Fremont 

Gastonia 

Goldsboro 

Graham 

Greensboro* 

Greenville 

Hamlet 

Henderson 

HendersonviUeJ . 

Hertford 

Hickory 

High Point 

Kinston 

Laurinburg 

Lenoir 



Superintendent (s) 
or Principal (p). 



G. C. Singletary, s. . 

H. A. Scott, s 

O. V. Woosley, s._. 

R. J. Tighe, s 

W. M. Hinton, s... 
F. P. Rockette, s. . . 

W. M. Rogers, s 

Frank H. Curtis, s.. 
R. D. McDowell, s.. 









High- 
school 
Teachers. 



Enrollment 



Ms 



03 



o 

PQ 



O 



32 
32 
32 
38 
32 
32 
28 
36 
36 



1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


3 



17 
17 
23 
137 
14 
14 
6 
27 
40 



15 
33 

42 
141 
20 
19 
12 
60 
46 



H. P. Harding, p. 
J. W. Strassell, s.. 

J. D. Lentz, s 

J. A. McLean, s... 



36 
32 
32 
30 



W. D. Carmichael, s • 38 



R. H. Bachman, s._ 

S. L. Sheep, s 

J. A. .Jones, s 



36 
36 
32 



10 
1 

4 

1 

1.5 

2 

5 
4 



M..T. Edgerton, s 

Joe S. Wray, s 

Jos. E. Avent, s 

A. T. Allen, s _'_ 

W. H. Swift, s 

H. B. Smith, s 

W. L. Cridlebaugh, s. . 
J. T. .Alderman, s 



36 
32 
36 
34 
36 
32 
32 
36 



105 

14 

45 

9 

223 
16 
92 
45 



176 
15 
71 
20 

246 
21 
99 
84 



4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


5 


3 


2 


3 


10 


2 


3 


2 


1 


4 


3 



S. B. Underwood, s.. 
Charles M. Staley, s. 

Harry Howell, s 

Bruce Craven, s 

Edwin D. Pusey, s.. 
J. L. Harris, s 



32 
32 
32 
32 
36 
36 



19 i 29 
50 44 



o 



bt-o 



32 
50 
65 

278 ! 

34 : 

33 j 
18 

87 
86 ! 



281 
29 

116 
29 

469 
37 

191 

129 



49 


36 


85 


62 


74 


136 


70 


85 


155 


21 


24 


45 


31 


160 


291 


13 


26 


39 


13 


13 


26 


32 


68 


100 



48 
94 



46 


44, 


90 


63 


101 


164 


33 


36 


69 


25 


40 


65 



t25 
38 
51 

223 
25 

t25 
12 
76 
71 



245 
22 
92 

t20 

367 
30 

175 
tlOO 



50 
117 

130 
38 

222 
30 
15 
79 



45 
77 
73 
121 
52 
55 



Public High Scpiools, 1909-1910. 



97 



Table IV. — Continued. 



Enrollment. 



High School, 
1909-10. 



Lexington 

Lincolnton 

LouisburgJ 

Lumberton 

Marion ' 

Maxton 

Monroe* 

Mooresville 

Morgant on 

Mount Airy 

Mount Olive 

Nashville 

New Bern ^ 

Newton 

North Wilkesboro . 

Oxford 

Plymouth 

Raleigh* 

Randleman 

Reidsville 

Roanoke Rapids _ _ 

Rockingham 

Rocky Mount 

Roxboro 

Salisbury 

Sanf ord 

Scotland Neck* 

Selma* 

Shelby 

Smithfleld 

Spencer 

Spring Hope 

Statesville 

Tarborot 



Superintendent (s) 
or Principal (p). 



A. H. Jarratt, s. 
Barron P. Caldwell, s. 




R. E. Sentelle, s. 

D. F. Giles, s 
R. L. Thomasson, s 
L. P. Wilson, s. 
A. C. Kerley, s. 

E. W. S. Cobb, s 
J. T. Spears, s 
No report 
No report 
H. B. Craven, s. 
E. O. Smithdeal, s 
W. G. Coltrane, s 
J. R. Conley, s 

C. J. Everett, s. 
Hugh Morson, p 
J. B. Robertson 
S. G. Harden, s 

A. E. Akers, s. - 
L. J. Bell, s. 
Z. D. McWhorter, s 
R. H. Burns, s. 
N. V. Taylor, s. 
R. W. Allen, s. 
Ashby Dunn, s. 

B. F. Hassell, s. 
J. Y. Irwin, s 

Ira T. Turlington, s ; .34 

Hugh Long, s 34 

A. B. Harrell, s 32 

D. Matt Thompson, s 34 



Part III— 7 



98 



Public High Schools. 1909-1910. 



Table IV. — Continued. 



High School, 
1909-'10. 



Superintendent (s) 
or Principal (p). 



Thomasville J.N. Hauss, s 

Troy* 1 Wade Cranford, s. 

Wadesboro .1. H. Mclver, s. _ . 

Washington N. C. Newbold, s. 

Waynesville ^ W. C. Allen, s 

Weldon R. H. Latham, s.. 



Wilmington*. 

Wilson 

Winston 



P. E. Seagle, p 

Charles L. Coon, .s.. 
No report 



O M 
*j q; 



a; 



t- yj 



High- 
school 
Teachers. 



n :3 






\^a \ ^H 



:5S 



32 
32 
32 
34 

i 

32 
34 
32 
36 



3 ! 

2 , 

3 

3i 

4 

4 

4 

4 






Enrollment. 






14 
12 
16 
39 
84 
8 

68 
25 



O 



16 
17 
21 
55 
81 
20 
191 
55 



♦Statistics for 1908-09; no report for 1909-'10. 
JSeS list of public high schools. 



tEstimated. 



o 






30 
29 
37 
94 

*165 : 

28 

259 

80 



27 
t20 

31 

77 
104 

26 
220 

65 



Public H-igh Schools, 1909-1910. 



99 













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